Politics 🗳️ NZ Politics

Just think if the parents have raised concerns, which they have, they have every right to suggest guidelines in this area. They are responsible for their children’s safety and shouldn’t be questioned in trying to do so
for sure.
there should also be some onus on the parents to ensure their children aren’t messaging politicians, or adults in general.
if the kids hadn’t first messaged him, there would be no reply and no story.
 
for sure.
there should also be some onus on the parents to ensure their children aren’t messaging politicians, or adults in general.
if the kids hadn’t first messaged him, there would be no reply and no story.
You’re right. A child should know better than an adult. Those parents should give up their day jobs to patrol their kids search engines. Cheers marv, I needed a good laugh headed into work
 
You’re right. A child should know better than an adult. Those parents should give up their day jobs to patrol their kids search engines. Cheers marv, I needed a good laugh headed into work
dude, the kids initiated contact with a weird little nerd.

if they hadn’t have done that, there’s no story.
i’m not saying he should have replied but making out like he’s out there probably praying on kids ain’t really it.


they messaged him - he replied.
how anyone can be shocked at getting their desired outcome is beyond me.
 
dude, the kids initiated contact with a weird little nerd.

if they hadn’t have done that, there’s no story.
i’m not saying he should have replied but making out like he’s out there probably praying on kids ain’t really it.


they messaged him - he replied.
how anyone can be shocked at getting their desired outcome is beyond me.
It’s shocked the parent which deserves the guidelines to be looked into that they desire. Don’t see how nobody sees it as weird to respond like the mother and one of the people interacted with and one of the kids grown up a bit now
 
dude, the kids initiated contact with a weird little nerd.

if they hadn’t have done that, there’s no story.
i’m not saying he should have replied but making out like he’s out there probably praying on kids ain’t really it.


they messaged him - he replied.
how anyone can be shocked at getting their desired outcome is beyond me.
People are shocked by the judgement of a party leader taking the time & effort to reply to children.

And also there is the context of the party president who left abruptly...
 
It’s shocked the parent which deserves the guidelines to be looked into that they desire. Don’t see how nobody sees it as weird to respond like the mother and one of the people interacted with and one of the kids grown up a bit now
i agree with you, it’s weird.
he’s weird. and it should be looked into.

but it’s also a beat up. it would 100% not be an issue if it were some other politicians.

responsibility lies with the children to not be sending flirty messages to adults and the parents to raise their children better.

it goes without saying seymour has a responsibility to not engage.

but it doesn’t change that these kids initiated contact and it’s now eight years later an outrage he replied courteously.
the fact you can harass a politician without consequence is fucking wild.




-not just this instance.
all the rubbish most female politicians endure.
 
Pity I can't unlock this anymore. If I could I would say that this is more softening up for privatisation

Government ministers raise concerns about financial outlook and safety record at KiwiRail​

Government ministers have raised “serious questions” about KiwiRail’s financial outlook and its safety record, while two more members have resigned from the state-owed enterprise’s board.

The directors who resigned are Rachel Pinn, a transport consultant, and Ed Sims, the former chief executive of Canadian airline WestJet. Their resignations follow ministers announcing the early retirement of board chairman David McLean.

Minister for State-Owned Enterprises Paul Goldsmith says a search for a replacement board chair is under way and will be progressed urgently.

Government ministers have raised “serious questions” about KiwiRail’s financial outlook and its safety record, while two more members have resigned from the state-owed enterprise’s board.

The directors who resigned are Rachel Pinn, a transport consultant, and Ed Sims, the former chief executive of Canadian airline WestJet. Their resignations follow ministers announcing the early retirement of board chairman David McLean.

Minister for State-Owned Enterprises Paul Goldsmith says a search for a replacement board chair is under way and will be progressed urgently.

“We have serious questions about whether KiwiRail, operating under its current business model, will be able to operate without ongoing dependence on government subsidies and support”, Goldsmith wrote in the letter.

KiwiRail has a target to achieve commercial self-sustainability for its above-rail assets which include its rail freight and Interislander ferry businesses.

This means generating sufficient operating surplus to self-fund the capital expenditure required to maintain and renew these above-rail assets, Goldsmith said.

The ongoing annual operating surplus KiwiRail estimated it would require to achieve this was redacted in the letter.

“This had earlier been expected to be achieved by FY25 (the 2025 financial year) and this no longer appears likely based on KiwiRail’s commercial performance to date”, Goldsmith said.

Ministers were aware KiwiRail had commissioned global management consultants McKinsey & Company to review strategic growth options and improve operational performance. They wanted to discuss what the consultants had to say when the advice was finalised.

Since this letter was written, Finance Minister Nicola Willis has revealed exactly what she thought of the advice.

Willis said the cost of it was “excessive and not justifiable”. She didn’t think an organisation with highly paid executives, like KiwiRail, should have to spend a sum as big as it did on external consultants for advice on how to run its core business.

“Frankly, if I were on the board, I would have been asking why couldn’t my executive come up with this themselves.”

Responding to the concerns raised about KiwiRail’s financial outlook, chief executive Peter Reidy said despite the tough economic climate, KiwiRail’s self-sustainable target remained the objective of the board and management.

“We are working to grow revenue, improve our operational efficiency and deliver better for our customers.

“The KiwiRail management team has been working with consultant firm McKinsey to assess the full potential of the business as well as to develop a robust plan to deliver increased value.”

McKinsey’s support has involved bringing in global railway expertise, Reidy said.

“To support and challenge KiwiRail on our growth, productivity and technology plan to achieve the required targets.”

In his letter, Goldsmith also raised concerns about the Kaitaki mayday call incident when the ferry lost power in Cook Strait with 864 people on board and started drifting towards Wellington’s rocky South Coast.

“Recent incidents including the January 2023 Kaitaki incident have made us concerned about KiwiRail’s approach to health and safety and its ongoing asset management practices. We expect lessons learnt from this are applied across all company activities”, Goldsmith wrote.

In a recent exclusive interview with the Herald, Reidy said apart from the Aratere grounding last month and the Kaitaki incident, Interislander’s recent performance has been strong thanks to increased maintenance.

Interislander had 99% reliability and 92% safe, on-time performance to schedule, from December to April. This compares with the year before Reidy returned to the organisation when one in five sailings were cancelled.

Goldsmith said KiwiRail was failing to achieve its target of halving its Total Recordable Injury Frequency Rate (TRIFR) over three years. This figure records how often injuries happen at work.

Ministers expected to see “demonstrably improved health and safety outcomes”.

Reidy said KiwiRail would continue to focus on the lagging safety indicator.

In the 2022 financial year, there was a 23.2% reduction in the TRIFR from 31.2 to 23.9 injuries per million people-hours worked. The following financial year it was 25.8.

Reidy said the latest available figures show a 10% decrease over the 12 months to the end of May.

“KiwiRail is committed to lifting the health and safety performance of the company to ensure our team arrives home safely every day. We have engaged extensively with all staff and union members to lead and drive comprehensive leadership-led safety culture improvement.”

High-potential critical risk near-miss events – those that could lead to a fatality or serious harm - have reduced by 43% over the 12 months to the end of May, Reidy said.

“This is an important leading indicator for safety culture and risk severity.”

 

Government ministers raise concerns about financial outlook and safety record at KiwiRail​

Government ministers have raised “serious questions” about KiwiRail’s financial outlook and its safety record, while two more members have resigned from the state-owed enterprise’s board.

The directors who resigned are Rachel Pinn, a transport consultant, and Ed Sims, the former chief executive of Canadian airline WestJet. Their resignations follow ministers announcing the early retirement of board chairman David McLean.

Minister for State-Owned Enterprises Paul Goldsmith says a search for a replacement board chair is under way and will be progressed urgently.

Government ministers have raised “serious questions” about KiwiRail’s financial outlook and its safety record, while two more members have resigned from the state-owed enterprise’s board.

The directors who resigned are Rachel Pinn, a transport consultant, and Ed Sims, the former chief executive of Canadian airline WestJet. Their resignations follow ministers announcing the early retirement of board chairman David McLean.

Minister for State-Owned Enterprises Paul Goldsmith says a search for a replacement board chair is under way and will be progressed urgently.

“We have serious questions about whether KiwiRail, operating under its current business model, will be able to operate without ongoing dependence on government subsidies and support”, Goldsmith wrote in the letter.

KiwiRail has a target to achieve commercial self-sustainability for its above-rail assets which include its rail freight and Interislander ferry businesses.

This means generating sufficient operating surplus to self-fund the capital expenditure required to maintain and renew these above-rail assets, Goldsmith said.

The ongoing annual operating surplus KiwiRail estimated it would require to achieve this was redacted in the letter.

“This had earlier been expected to be achieved by FY25 (the 2025 financial year) and this no longer appears likely based on KiwiRail’s commercial performance to date”, Goldsmith said.

Ministers were aware KiwiRail had commissioned global management consultants McKinsey & Company to review strategic growth options and improve operational performance. They wanted to discuss what the consultants had to say when the advice was finalised.

Since this letter was written, Finance Minister Nicola Willis has revealed exactly what she thought of the advice.

Willis said the cost of it was “excessive and not justifiable”. She didn’t think an organisation with highly paid executives, like KiwiRail, should have to spend a sum as big as it did on external consultants for advice on how to run its core business.

“Frankly, if I were on the board, I would have been asking why couldn’t my executive come up with this themselves.”

Responding to the concerns raised about KiwiRail’s financial outlook, chief executive Peter Reidy said despite the tough economic climate, KiwiRail’s self-sustainable target remained the objective of the board and management.

“We are working to grow revenue, improve our operational efficiency and deliver better for our customers.

“The KiwiRail management team has been working with consultant firm McKinsey to assess the full potential of the business as well as to develop a robust plan to deliver increased value.”

McKinsey’s support has involved bringing in global railway expertise, Reidy said.

“To support and challenge KiwiRail on our growth, productivity and technology plan to achieve the required targets.”

In his letter, Goldsmith also raised concerns about the Kaitaki mayday call incident when the ferry lost power in Cook Strait with 864 people on board and started drifting towards Wellington’s rocky South Coast.

“Recent incidents including the January 2023 Kaitaki incident have made us concerned about KiwiRail’s approach to health and safety and its ongoing asset management practices. We expect lessons learnt from this are applied across all company activities”, Goldsmith wrote.

In a recent exclusive interview with the Herald, Reidy said apart from the Aratere grounding last month and the Kaitaki incident, Interislander’s recent performance has been strong thanks to increased maintenance.

Interislander had 99% reliability and 92% safe, on-time performance to schedule, from December to April. This compares with the year before Reidy returned to the organisation when one in five sailings were cancelled.

Goldsmith said KiwiRail was failing to achieve its target of halving its Total Recordable Injury Frequency Rate (TRIFR) over three years. This figure records how often injuries happen at work.

Ministers expected to see “demonstrably improved health and safety outcomes”.

Reidy said KiwiRail would continue to focus on the lagging safety indicator.

In the 2022 financial year, there was a 23.2% reduction in the TRIFR from 31.2 to 23.9 injuries per million people-hours worked. The following financial year it was 25.8.

Reidy said the latest available figures show a 10% decrease over the 12 months to the end of May.

“KiwiRail is committed to lifting the health and safety performance of the company to ensure our team arrives home safely every day. We have engaged extensively with all staff and union members to lead and drive comprehensive leadership-led safety culture improvement.”

High-potential critical risk near-miss events – those that could lead to a fatality or serious harm - have reduced by 43% over the 12 months to the end of May, Reidy said.

“This is an important leading indicator for safety culture and risk severity.”

Thanks. National are following textbook neoliberal guidelines - run something down, soften the public, sell it off
 
Thanks. National are following textbook neoliberal guidelines - run something down, soften the public, sell it off
Yeah because it’s all happened under National’s watch hasn’t it…

KiwiRail have had an absolute shocker. Just one example however they thought they would lift profits by increasing rates nearly 30% on the Auckland-Tauranga line back in February last year. Totally backfired - Port of Tauranga’s Metroport service became uncompetitive & lost a heap of volume to Ports of Auckland and KiwiRail ended up far worse off. They are clueless.
 
Thanks. National are following textbook neoliberal guidelines - run something down, soften the public, sell it off
Labours Kiwirail incompetence example:

Te Huia (Hamilton/ Auckland train).

- Unprofitable ($50m pa subsidy)
- Embarrassingly low usage
- Takes 2 hours 40 minute (double car)
- Unreliable
- affected by low Auckland rail speeds when it gets to hot 🙄
- Banned recently from Auckland for safety reasons…

Look for the govt to stop funding this ideological white elephant when more money is needed.

Cleary Labour have run Kiwirail so badly they already don’t have much public support.
 
Labours Kiwirail incompetence example:

Te Huia (Hamilton/ Auckland train).

- Unprofitable ($50m pa subsidy)
- Embarrassingly low usage
- Takes 2 hours 40 minute (double car)
- Unreliable
- affected by low Auckland rail speeds when it gets to hot 🙄
- Banned recently from Auckland for safety reasons…

Look for the govt to stop funding this ideological white elephant when more money is needed.

Cleary Labour have run Kiwirail so badly they already don’t have much public support.
To be fair, KiwiRail is decades and decades of incompetence, including when it was a publicly listed company. Performance deteriorated under Labour, no question, however it’s unfair to blame them solely. As for blaming the current coalition Government that’s been in power for less than a year and is clearly trying to enforce accountability back on the KiwiRail executives and board, that’s just idiotic.
 
Yeah because it’s all happened under National’s watch hasn’t it…

KiwiRail have had an absolute shocker. Just one example however they thought they would lift profits by increasing rates nearly 30% on the Auckland-Tauranga line back in February last year. Totally backfired - Port of Tauranga’s Metroport service became uncompetitive & lost a heap of volume to Ports of Auckland and KiwiRail ended up far worse off. They are clueless.
What he is saying is National are ramping up the rhetoric for privatisation & his not wrong.
 
People are shocked by the judgement of a party leader taking the time & effort to reply to children.

And also there is the context of the party president who left abr

What he is saying is National are ramping up the rhetoric for privatisation & his not wrong.
On the evidence to date of Kiwirail, privitisation would be an improvement.
 
Labours Kiwirail incompetence example:

Te Huia (Hamilton/ Auckland train).

- Unprofitable ($50m pa subsidy)
- Embarrassingly low usage
- Takes 2 hours 40 minute (double car)
- Unreliable
- affected by low Auckland rail speeds when it gets to hot 🙄
- Banned recently from Auckland for safety reasons…

Look for the govt to stop funding this ideological white elephant when more money is needed.

Cleary Labour have run Kiwirail so badly they already don’t have much public support.
Te Huia is funded by New Zealand Transport Agency and local councils through to June 2026. As at June 2024, the public funding portion is currently split between NZTA (75.5 per cent), Waikato Regional Council (21.2 per cent) and Waikato District Council (3.3 per cent).
 
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