Internationals Strategies & Ideas to Grow International Rugby League

¿N. ig-mah¿

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May 1, 2012
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Some journo alluded to the same situation this week. Tonga (and Poland) could claim Dallin Watene-Zelezniak ffs.

Ok as Hardymans Yugo correctly says the Irish football team is mainly English, as are the bloody Pogues. The Pogues are a fake Irish band IMO except for the fact their lead singer was born in Ireland but spent most of his life in England They are a bloody good band, but they are not an Irish band.

International sport is for citizens of a country. Even the Americas Cup started out like that to the extent of arranging passports for "fake" citizens.

If they are not citizens, they are fakes, end of story.
The Kiwis better join that fake column too then. You only need residency or a grandparent connection. Australia dabble with it too.

International rugby league eligibility rules are a joke. So are many other international sports.

This isnt an eligibility debate. This is about the competition structure on offer.

If they are eligible under the current rules to play for a team, they can. If not, they cant. Thats not fake. Thats playing by the rules.

You are incredibly difficult to debate with, cos im never sure what debate im in.
 
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bruce

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Sep 1, 2015
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International rugby league eligibility rules are a joke. So are many other international sports.
English cricket is almost a world eleven and has been for years. Geez even the Baggy Greens signed up a South African once, but only once.

It doesn't mean that because it goes on it is good for the game. If it were not for the NZRL Tonga wouldn't exist. So they should not be putting the NZRL at risk for a fake team.
 

¿N. ig-mah¿

Warriors 1st Grader
May 1, 2012
6,081
Invercargill
English cricket is almost a world eleven and has been for years. Geez even the Baggy Greens signed up a South African once, but only once.

It doesn't mean that because it goes on it is good for the game. If it were not for the NZRL Tonga wouldn't exist. So they should not be putting the NZRL at risk for a fake team.
Then we should lock the NZRL away in a display case and only look at it from afar. That is an Australian mentality. If we want to be a competitive nation in the world of rugby league, we accept the rules, we use them to our advantage, and we play the game. Otherwise we have no status internationally.

Im not sure how your argument relates to this competition idea. We will play Australia, England, Tonga, and sometimes France, Samoa, Fiji, PNG, etc. It looks like we are even going to go up against another Great Britain team in a year or 2. The eligibility rules dont change that, and denying a worthwhile format due to disapproving of rules wont change it either. All teams have the rule book. Its how you use it that matters.

The more games i get to see us play, the better.
 
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Brother Faisal

1st Grade Fringe
May 9, 2012
2,198
Christchurch
At the end of the day the brand is why we watch them play. Although they may not be legit kiwis aussies Tongans etc we are the ones that are being represented so if they do well as a kiwi I am happy no matter who dons the jumper. Obviously those rules manipulate the market of players which is a small pool when you consider competing at the top level so fighting over a kaylyn ponga is important because it increases your chance of success and improving your brand. Ultimately we should be aiming to increase the talent pool to where we can still field a team irrespective of Tonga taking some. We are very close to that stage and might I add in 10-15 years time it may be even better.
 

playdaball

Heritage Member
Apr 23, 2012
2,495
Look at how many South Africans are playing cricket for NZ these days ... not just RL
 
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bruce

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Sep 1, 2015
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Ultimately we should be aiming to increase the talent pool to where we can still field a team irrespective of Tonga taking some.
I think that might be happening anyway brother. The losers will be the Kiwi Tongans who chose to go with the Tongan team. That is assuming they get their beans tomorrow but I cannot see a Kangaroo side being beaten by some Tongan heritage players and a couple of NZ traitors. Mount Wellington will be hoping for me to be wrong, I know.:D
Look at how many South Africans are playing cricket for NZ these days ... not just RL
I know:(:(
 

mrblonde

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Apr 14, 2012
4,073
Auckland
Im not sure everyone has picked up on the constant promotion/relegation of the concept. It will happen each season it is played, so nothing is forever.

Promotion/relegation works best when there's not a "yo-yo" situation: Team A not good enough for League 1 gets relegated in Year 1. Team A too good for League 2 gets promoted in year 2. Rinse and repeat. There needs to be genuine "Well, obviously, they should get relegated/promoted but..." suspense about a couple of teams at least. You don't want - and you never get for a myriad of reasons, not just the amount of money spent on a team - all teams with an equal chance every year, but you want some variability.

I like the basic idea of this but personally, I'd rather see a tournament where all teams meet in one country - or two, if need be. Make it a mini-World Cup. TBPH, I wouldn't miss the RLWC if it wasn't there. I would miss the Four Nations, though.

As to the issue Bruce brings up - if the player has a New Zealand passport (or has in some other way met the sport's residency rules), they're eligible in my book. I'd just make a blanket rule:
1. The Country you want to play for must be nominated within two months of your particular sport's latest World Cup/equivalent ending. By "World Cup" I basically mean the international trophy that is held in the highest regard in that sport if there is in fact no World Cup.
2. After making that nomination, you cannot change country for the next four years. None of this "Bugger, didn't get picked for New Zealand, Hellllooo Tonga!" yearly switching.
 
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¿N. ig-mah¿

Warriors 1st Grader
May 1, 2012
6,081
Invercargill
Promotion/relegation works best when there's not a "yo-yo" situation: Team A not good enough for League 1 gets relegated in Year 1. Team A too good for League 2 gets promoted in year 2. Rinse and repeat. There needs to be genuine "Well, obviously, they should get relegated/promoted but..." suspense about a couple of teams at least. You don't want - and you never get for a myriad of reasons, not just the amount of money spent on a team - all teams with an equal chance every year, but you want some variability.

I like the basic idea of this but personally, I'd rather see a tournament where all teams meet in one country - or two, if need be. Make it a mini-World Cup. TBPH, I wouldn't miss the RLWC if it wasn't there. I would miss the Four Nations, though.

As to the issue Bruce brings up - if the player has a New Zealand passport (or has in some other way met the sport's residency rules), they're eligible in my book. I'd just make a blanket rule:
1. The Country you want to play for must be nominated within two months of your particular sport's latest World Cup/equivalent ending. By "World Cup" I basically mean the international trophy that is held in the highest regard in that sport if there is in fact no World Cup.
2. After making that nomination, you cannot change country for the next four years. None of this "Bugger, didn't get picked for New Zealand, Hellllooo Tonga!" yearly switching.
They simply need to remove there tier 1, tier 2 eligibility rules. You play for a team, you are stuck with them for a set period.

Id be happy if the World Cup continued, but without NZ, Aus, England. I live watching unheard of minnow countries battling it out with similarly talented teams. We can have our 4 Nations instead. But if that is what happened, Australia would be required to play EVERY season.
 
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bruce

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Sep 1, 2015
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After making that nomination, you cannot change country for the next four years. None of this "Bugger, didn't get picked for New Zealand, Hellllooo Tonga!" yearly switching.
Or I don't like the coach because he kept me on the bench and it gave me period pains. Heyzeuss spare me Gary Freeman needed one more test to qualify for a transfer out of the country and the coach Tony Gordon left him sitting on the bench until very late in the game.

I see Chris Rattue at it again, blaming the Australian for lining up Tonga unprepared compared to their buildup. Very fair comment IMO.

It has to be said Tonga are now playing at true international level but the goalposts have been widened for them. A lot of their players were former Kiwis and Kangaroos. That is unfair, especially for the Kiwis who have less players to call on.

If a player was forced to make a decision,. especially the Australian born Tongans, that would weaken their strength immediately. Tonga would be forced to rely on Aussie and Kiwi kids deciding they wanted to play for Tonga.

I am not saying there wouldn't be players who would do that, but considering they scored Taumalolo and Fusitua because they got the pip I doubt it will be a treadmill in the future.

SOO would take care of the good Australian born players anyway.
 
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matiunz

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Jul 15, 2013
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www.nrl.com

aus-cleeb-181013_gt_108.jpg

REPRESENTATIVE

RLIF confirms Nines World Cup, Oceania Cup in 2019
Alicia Newton NRL.com Reporter in England
Sun 11 Nov 2018, 09:16 AM
Australia will host the inaugural RLIF Nines World Cup and feature in a new Oceania Cup at the end of next season before touring Britain in 2020 as part of the new international calendar agreed to, in principle, by the Rugby League International Federation Board in the UK on Saturday (Sunday AEDT).

Delegates from more than 20 nations met in York this week for the RLIF Congress, and elected ARLC chairman Peter Beattie as deputy chair with former Scotland international Graeme Thompson elevated to the chair role in place of John Grant, who stood down at the AGM.

The main issue of the meeting was the future of the international game and locking in key fixtures for at least the next eight years and leading into the 2021 Rugby League World Cup.

The Nines World Cup will see men and women from nations across the world compete in a nine-a-side tournament.

The proposed plan also includes an Oceania Cup featuring Australia, New Zealand and Tonga in one group and Samoa, Fiji and Papua New Guinea in the other group.

However, the Kangaroos are not scheduled to play Wayne Bennett's England team for two years as the Great Britain Lions will tour the Southern Hemisphere in 2019 to face New Zealand, Tonga, Samoa, Fiji and Papua New Guinea.

"The whole international rugby league world has looked to us to complete this important piece of work. The discussions this week have been extremely collaborative and positive," RLIF CEO Nigel Woods said.

"This is a complex process and if we can put all the pieces of the jig-saw into place we will have a very exciting programme."

"There is some further consultation to be undertaken with leagues and playing groups together with some important commercial evaluations before we could make final announcements, however we are confident that we can complete these discussions before Christmas."

England were eager to play the Kangaroos, while Australia wanted to tour Britain next year but organisers of the 2021 World Cup wanted that delayed until the year leading into the tournament to build momentum.

Australia are the RLIF's top-ranked team and beat England 6-0 in last year's World Cup final, while Bennett's team have this season triumphed in three Tests against New Zealand.

Further space remains on the calendar for individual nations like England to organise their next opponents.

England coach Wayne Bennett remained confident his side would play internationals in 2019 on Saturday.

"We'll be playing somewhere," Bennett said.

"We don't play an Origin series, we cannot afford to let Australia continue that advantage because Origin gives them a great advantage. We've got to keep playing in the off-season."

We cannot afford to let Australia continue that advantage because Origin gives them a great advantage.

Wayne Bennett
It was also announced that Thompson, a former England team manager and Scotland international, would replace Grant as RLIF chairman effective immediately.

Thompson has been on the RLIF board since 2011 and replaces Grant who took on the role in February after six years as ARLC chairman. Grant completed his final RLIF duties at the AGM after announcing he would step down this month in July.

Beattie will step into the role as Thompson's deputy.

The RLIF also announced there will be ongoing discussions to ensure the program for the women's game and for wheelchair rugby league are advanced at a similar rate to the men's game.

The board has also approved financial support for the Americas Championship and a new competition for nations in the Middle East and Africa, the MEA Championship.

RLIF investment will be annual, beginning in 2019, underlining the strategic significance of and recent growth in these territories.

NRL CEO Todd Greenberg said "it was refreshing to see the way in which we were all able to work together, particularly the Pacific nations, to deliver the framework for this calendar".

RFL CEO Ralph Rimmer said the 2019 calendar was not yet set in stone but was pleased with the outcome of the meeting.

"These are exciting times for the sport in general and particularly the chance we have to both take a Great Britain team to the Southern Hemisphere next year and then welcome the Kangaroos in 2020
 

bruce

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Sep 1, 2015
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Lets us be honest. The real reason NZ needs internationals is income for the NZRL, which is more than fair. The ARL get theirs from SOO, the Rugby League must get a slice from Super League somehow.

So somebody please explain how bringing in fake teams adds to that, apart from the short term fizz the Kiwi Tongans will provide.
 

Hardyman's Yugo

1st Grade Fringe
Jun 2, 2017
3,451
Lancashire, England
Red Star Belgrade compete in the Challenge Cup. A long way to go to get beat!

Challenge Cup: Red Star Belgrade beaten 38-10 by Cumbrian amateur side Millom
_105362846_red-1.jpg

Red Star played in blue on their first trip to Cumbria
Red Star Belgrade made an unsuccessful debut in rugby league's oldest competition as they lost 38-10 to Cumbrian amateur side Millom in the first round of the Challenge Cup.

Their football counterparts from the multi-sports club from Serbia won the European Cup in 1991.

But Red Star's rugby players found in windswept Cumbria that cracking the 13-man code may prove a bit trickier.

They shipped seven tries at Coronation Field, scoring just two of their own.

Centre Aleksandar Djordjevic and Australia's Darcy Etrich both crossed the whitewash against the world's oldest amateur club, who play in the third tier of the National Conference League,

"It was an honour to play in one of the biggest tournaments in any sport. And in the place where rugby was made," said Djordjevic, a basketball-playing sporting all-rounder who has also represented his country at rugby union and became the first Serb to score a Challenge Cup try.

In the first round of Challenge Cup fixtures since Catalans Dragons became the first non-English side to win the famous old trophy last August, Red Star showed that they have a long way to go to match those heights.

But Red Star's director of rugby, Englishman Mark Pullen, conceded that his side's chastening experience in the face of a biting gale and resolute hosts was maybe exactly what they need in order to evolve.

"I wanted them to take a beating," said Pullen. "Whether it was in this round or the next, it was going to happen. We needed it because we had gone through the whole of last season unbeaten.

"It was about our boys being tested by a traditional team in the game. They will take a lot away from this experience. It's a long-term project. We would love to get the chance to return to the Challenge Cup next season."

Millom, known as the 'Woolybacks', had considered not entering this season's competition because of fixture congestion.

But in the end, sparked by an early try from local favourite Noah Robinson, they relished the exposure, viewed from a BBC camera gantry constructed specially for the occasion.

Red Star's future plans
Red Star's owner, the Australian-based businessman Colin Kleyweg, said the first step is a potential expansion of the current Balkan Super League, in which Red Star are currently an all-too-dominant force.

"When we applied to the Rugby Football League we explained that what we were scared of was that we were winning our matches too comfortably," he said.

"We won one of our semi-finals this season 94-2, and another match by over 100 points, which really isn't a good thing for anybody.

"That was the catalyst for us really pushing for entry into the Challenge Cup.

"We would like to increase interest levels and hopefully use it to evolve the Balkan Super League into a broader and more competitive European competition."
 

Swanley

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 13, 2012
3,052
Tonbridge, Kent, UK
Red Star Belgrade compete in the Challenge Cup. A long way to go to get beat!

Challenge Cup: Red Star Belgrade beaten 38-10 by Cumbrian amateur side Millom
_105362846_red-1.jpg

Red Star played in blue on their first trip to Cumbria
Red Star Belgrade made an unsuccessful debut in rugby league's oldest competition as they lost 38-10 to Cumbrian amateur side Millom in the first round of the Challenge Cup.

Their football counterparts from the multi-sports club from Serbia won the European Cup in 1991.

But Red Star's rugby players found in windswept Cumbria that cracking the 13-man code may prove a bit trickier.

They shipped seven tries at Coronation Field, scoring just two of their own.

Centre Aleksandar Djordjevic and Australia's Darcy Etrich both crossed the whitewash against the world's oldest amateur club, who play in the third tier of the National Conference League,

"It was an honour to play in one of the biggest tournaments in any sport. And in the place where rugby was made," said Djordjevic, a basketball-playing sporting all-rounder who has also represented his country at rugby union and became the first Serb to score a Challenge Cup try.

In the first round of Challenge Cup fixtures since Catalans Dragons became the first non-English side to win the famous old trophy last August, Red Star showed that they have a long way to go to match those heights.

But Red Star's director of rugby, Englishman Mark Pullen, conceded that his side's chastening experience in the face of a biting gale and resolute hosts was maybe exactly what they need in order to evolve.

"I wanted them to take a beating," said Pullen. "Whether it was in this round or the next, it was going to happen. We needed it because we had gone through the whole of last season unbeaten.

"It was about our boys being tested by a traditional team in the game. They will take a lot away from this experience. It's a long-term project. We would love to get the chance to return to the Challenge Cup next season."

Millom, known as the 'Woolybacks', had considered not entering this season's competition because of fixture congestion.

But in the end, sparked by an early try from local favourite Noah Robinson, they relished the exposure, viewed from a BBC camera gantry constructed specially for the occasion.

Red Star's future plans
Red Star's owner, the Australian-based businessman Colin Kleyweg, said the first step is a potential expansion of the current Balkan Super League, in which Red Star are currently an all-too-dominant force.

"When we applied to the Rugby Football League we explained that what we were scared of was that we were winning our matches too comfortably," he said.

"We won one of our semi-finals this season 94-2, and another match by over 100 points, which really isn't a good thing for anybody.

"That was the catalyst for us really pushing for entry into the Challenge Cup.

"We would like to increase interest levels and hopefully use it to evolve the Balkan Super League into a broader and more competitive European competition."
The kick off was a bit of a school boy error..
 
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bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
19,927
Interesting article, thought this would be the best home for it. Also thought I spotted bruce bruce in the crowd of one of those photos..

What a great story!!! I never knew about that.I didn't start playing till four years later though. ;)

Right after the RWC in 1987 I was on a flight to LA full of US rugby players...and their women...not their WAGS!!!.

What a hoot. They were really over sexed, the whole lot of them, as for the booze, they could really drink too!!!

They were good people though, nothing nasty at all. Just bloody good fun.
 

Pozza

1st Grade Fringe
May 19, 2012
1,718
Interesting article, thought this would be the best home for it. Also thought I spotted bruce bruce in the crowd of one of those photos..

I remember my Dad telling me about these guys. What these guys got up to would make them a shoe in for the NRL.
Great read!
 

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