General [official] Music Discussion Thread.

Hardyman's Yugo

1st Grade Fringe
Jun 2, 2017
3,455
Lancashire, England
The 90's had some great albums.

Started off on fire with some great albums. 1990 and 91 had some big albums.

AC/DC - The Razors Edge - Big songs and a big comeback album. Not an all killer no filler type album.
Nirvana - Nevermind
Metallica - Metallica
Guns n Roses - Use Your Illusion 1 and 2 - Would of been better as one but had enough impact and big songs across the two.
Red Hot Chilli Peppers - Blood Sugar Sex Magik finished the decade with Californication
Rage Against the Machine - Rage Against the Machine.
Pearl Jam - Ten and VS.
Greed Day - Dookie
Alanis Morrisiette - Jagged Little Pill
Tool - Undertow and Aenima
Korn - Korn and Follow the Leader
System of a Down - System of a Down

Probably missing a lot.

Like the 80s which went a bit overboard once grunge and alternative got popular the record companies milked all of that to death.
The decade of Britpop. Great albums by Blur, Oasis, Radiohead and Supergrass as well.

speaking of grunge
 

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
10,580
The 90's had some great albums.

Started off on fire with some great albums. 1990 and 91 had some big albums.

AC/DC - The Razors Edge - Big songs and a big comeback album. Not an all killer no filler type album.
Nirvana - Nevermind
Metallica - Metallica
Guns n Roses - Use Your Illusion 1 and 2 - Would of been better as one but had enough impact and big songs across the two.
Red Hot Chilli Peppers - Blood Sugar Sex Magik finished the decade with Californication
Rage Against the Machine - Rage Against the Machine.
Pearl Jam - Ten and VS.
Greed Day - Dookie
Alanis Morrisiette - Jagged Little Pill
Tool - Undertow and Aenima
Korn - Korn and Follow the Leader
System of a Down - System of a Down

Probably missing a lot.

Like the 80s which went a bit overboard once grunge and alternative got popular the record companies milked all of that to death.
Before everyone gets too nostalgic about 90’s music, remember it’s also the decade which gave us MMMBop by Hanson.

 
Last edited:

snake77

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 12, 2013
9,941
Auckland
The nostalgia kicks in for a decade's music about 20 years later. Each decade has it's defining styles, the 90's included Grunge and Britpop.
I was a kid in the 80s and a teen in the 90s. I started getting into music in the 80s but my tastes or scope of bands I'd listen to was pretty limited. The 90s pretty much shunned the 80s music which happens when things change. Think the 90s had a lot of people coming of age and seeing grunge and all of the alternative acts and gravitated towards it. It really resonated for gloomy teenagers.

I always had a soft spot for the stuff I listened to from the 80s. As I've gotten older the scope of what I listen to from that era has expanded.

So Its been good to see the 80s getting a bit more love in the media. At the moment that is more TV and movie focused but setting the stories there leads to the music being added.
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
19,974
Mike Oldfield and Pepsi deMacque from 1998.
If you watch Pepsi's red shirt too much you will go cross eyed :oops: , and Oldfield plays guitar in the same league as Clapton.

Pepsi worked in Wellington for some time.

 

Worried2Death

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 6, 2016
3,506
Mike Oldfield and Pepsi deMacque from 1998.
If you watch Pepsi's red shirt too much you will go cross eyed :oops: , and Oldfield plays guitar in the same league as Clapton.

Pepsi worked in Wellington for some time.

Dee was the John Lennon of Pepsi and Shirley, I had a lot of dreams about her when I was a young teenage idealist in the 80's, but let's not get into that here.

 
Last edited:
  • Love
Reactions: bruce

Evil_Mush

1st Grade Fringe
May 18, 2012
177
I was a kid in the 80s and a teen in the 90s. I started getting into music in the 80s but my tastes or scope of bands I'd listen to was pretty limited. The 90s pretty much shunned the 80s music which happens when things change. Think the 90s had a lot of people coming of age and seeing grunge and all of the alternative acts and gravitated towards it. It really resonated for gloomy teenagers.

I always had a soft spot for the stuff I listened to from the 80s. As I've gotten older the scope of what I listen to from that era has expanded.

So Its been good to see the 80s getting a bit more love in the media. At the moment that is more TV and movie focused but setting the stories there leads to the music being added.

Fellow 80s kid / 90s teen here (I turn 40 this week aaaaaah!) - pretty much agree with everything you've said here!

Just took me a bit longer to get into the rock scene in the 90s as I basically grew up on RTR countdown and the hardest sounding album my parents had while I was growing up was Duran Duran Rio (which I don't deny air guitaring along to with a tennis racquet in my younger years haha!).
 

matiunz

All Out!
Contributor
Jul 15, 2013
8,691
Sydney
Fellow 80s kid / 90s teen here (I turn 40 this week aaaaaah!) - pretty much agree with everything you've said here!

Just took me a bit longer to get into the rock scene in the 90s as I basically grew up on RTR countdown and the hardest sounding album my parents had while I was growing up was Duran Duran Rio (which I don't deny air guitaring along to with a tennis racquet in my younger years haha!).
Saw an article the other week that basically music you hear in your formative years around 14-25 will pretty much stick with you as your favourite music due to the emotional connections you make etc.
Might be bias being a fellow 80s/90s child but we had some pretty awesome pop culture
 

snake77

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 12, 2013
9,941
Auckland
Saw an article the other week that basically music you hear in your formative years around 14-25 will pretty much stick with you as your favourite music due to the emotional connections you make etc.
Might be bias being a fellow 80s/90s child but we had some pretty awesome pop culture
I've heard a variation of this in that the music you listen to up to a certain age will pretty much be it and your tastes won't expand. I often joke that I'm an outlier as my tastes have expanded. I listen to a lot varied stuff now. Unfortunately a lot would still be considered old so it matches your post.

As a teen besides AC/DC my 80s music was all tossed aside and I was full 90s metal, grunge, alternative then later nu metal. Now I'm back into a lot of 80s rock I even have branched out into a lot of 80s and 90s rap. I even pick up different songs or artists from various places like fighter walkout music, fight build up shows, TV and movies.

Getting older I found I don't keep track of am aware of new albums as I was. Some bands I see a new album and think well I didn't listen to the last one much I'll pass on this one.
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
19,974
Saw an article the other week that basically music you hear in your formative years around 14-25 will pretty much stick with you as your favourite music due to the emotional connections you make etc.
Might be bias being a fellow 80s/90s child but we had some pretty awesome pop culture
The Sound??? 🤔
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
19,974
The Sound??? 🤔
I was serious.

The baby boomers set the trend for music in the 20th century. Anything from the early 60s on became legendary, prior to that only Elvis and Cliff Richard really.

As for movies Barbra Streisand and Redford made "The way we were" about 1971, which was ok, but American Graffiti really started the nostalgia trend the following year.

The Eagles as a band were stuffed by 1980, but classic hits FM radio made them multi millionaires, with no new records. Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison all died in 1970, and are still rock stars today.

Most of Pink Floyd was recorded in the 70s, and Queen.

I can hear a song coming on...dig this riff:
 

Rick O'Shay

Warriors 1st Grader
May 1, 2013
4,802
New Plymouth
I was serious.

The baby boomers set the trend for music in the 20th century. Anything from the early 60s on became legendary, prior to that only Elvis and Cliff Richard really.

As for movies Barbra Streisand and Redford made "The way we were" about 1971, which was ok, but American Graffiti really started the nostalgia trend the following year.

The Eagles as a band were stuffed by 1980, but classic hits FM radio made them multi millionaires, with no new records. Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison all died in 1970, and are still rock stars today.

Most of Pink Floyd was recorded in the 70s, and Queen.

I can hear a song coming on...dig this riff:
That's a regular on The Sound. Hear they're banging out their own vinyl selection, tomorrow I think.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bruce and Noitall

mrblonde

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 14, 2012
4,077
Auckland
Never liked Jeff Buckley's version of this song much after hearing Cohen's original first. This is the only one that comes close imo

Funny you say that. I prefer Buckley's version having heard his first. :)

Thin Lizzy's version of "Whiskey In The Jar" to the Dubliners version. And to the Metallica version. James sounds almost gleeful to have been betrayed by Molly, Phil sounds rather less pleased...

This Mortal Coil's version of "Song To The Siren" over Tim Buckley's.

I'm sure there's several more...
 

Gizzyfan

Warriors 1st Grader
Jan 2, 2013
5,507
I was serious.

The baby boomers set the trend for music in the 20th century. Anything from the early 60s on became legendary, prior to that only Elvis and Cliff Richard really.

You are forgetting some of the inspirations for the 60's, a number of black American vocal groups, Chuck Berry, Everley Brothers, Buddy Holly, Eddie Cochran, The Shadows, Lonny Donergan. Then you have the old Bluesmen, Robert Johnson, BB King, Muddy Waters.

Where it started was the American Servicemen bringing the records over and people like the young Lennon, McCartney, Jagger, Richard and Clapton and others hearing and loving the sound. Then Lonny Donergan and Skiffle showing they could make their own bands with cheap guitars and homemade bass etc.
 

Worried2Death

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 6, 2016
3,506
Funny you say that. I prefer Buckley's version having heard his first. :)

Thin Lizzy's version of "Whiskey In The Jar" to the Dubliners version. And to the Metallica version. James sounds almost gleeful to have been betrayed by Molly, Phil sounds rather less pleased...

This Mortal Coil's version of "Song To The Siren" over Tim Buckley's.

I'm sure there's several more...
I feel you, it's all subjective to what we like. Elvis ruined Carl Perkins for me, and Yoko Ono's songs went downhill after she met the Beatles. You should hear what Dylan did to Sinatra's songs in the last couple of years, I can't listen to Frank's versions now.

800px-Sinatra_Ruins_Dylan.png
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Defence and bruce

Last Game

27 Aug

16 - 28
5.6 Total Avg Rating
0.0 Your Avg Rating

Highest Rated Player

Lowest Rated Player

Compiled from 5 ratings