General NZ Warriors Travel Discussion Thread

Iafeta_old

Guest
Playas,

I thought it would be a good idea to have a communal thread to discuss different travel holidays we've been on, including tips, perhaps photos, things to see/not to see... So, let us know where you've been etc...
 

Iafeta_old

Guest
At the back end of last year, I started my first big overseas trip. We went to Europe, via Singapore, and this is my view on the places we went....

Singapore: Very modern, very green, very friendly, very clean. One of the great things about Singapore is also the relative cost of taxis, very cheap. As far as shopping goes, people rave about Orchard Road, but my tip, go into the Marina, if you want to see sometihng extraordinary go to Suntec City. I'm a bloke who's not into shopping much, but I could have gone there for days strictly for that. Suntec City is basically 6-7 huge shopping towers all interconnected, very clean, lots of variety, and lots of uber cool deals. To give an idea, I bought 4 PC games (new ones) for like $70 Australian. I looked at what they retailed back here when I got home and I would have been forking out over $350. Another great thing in Singapore is the Jurong Bird Park, for any animal enthusiasts out there this and the Singapore Night Safari is wicked. Food wise, Singapore has more restaurants per kilometre than any place in the world, the variety is unparalleled. You can go to Italian, steakhouses, or course good old Asian cuisine. And because there's so many of them, you can get some cheap deals. Feka's must do: Have a Singapore Sling. Not a cocktail man myself, but these things are da bomb. 4.5*.

Edinburgh: It's not as big as I thought, but it's hard to explain just the sheer tapestry of history. The buildings blow you away, they're so old, and have such character. And then when you hit the centre of the city, to your right on a high rising hill is this amazing castle overlooking the city. It's quite freaky. If you're into history, Edinburgh is a priority. The only problem with the UK I found is the food, they tend to cook in a lot of fat. Feka's tip for food, go to pubs. Cheapest good food you can find, they're like historical RSAs. 4 *.

Stirling, Scotland: Went up there, via Edinburgh to the castle. Also on the way went to Linlithgow, which is a small, very old town with Linlitghgow Palace, where Mary Queen of Scots was born and raised. Stirling Castle was the former governing house of Scotland basically. Again, amazingly old, and high up perched over Stirling and looking up to the Highlands. You get a pristine view also of the William Wallace monument. 3.5*, not a lot else in Stirling but it's still a wicked place.

St Andrews, Scotland: Not a lot else up there, they do have a castle, but the main spot of course is the golf course. A great photo opportunity, and it's a really picturesque drive up the mid north of Scotland. 2.5*.

Durham, England: Is a little tricky to drive around I found. But the castle and just the old school nature of the town is pretty rad. 2*. We only stayed for half an hour en route, but its a good stopping point.

York, England: The York Minster is here, but alas I had no idea until I had left the town which is unfortunate. There's a lot of Roman fortifications here, the town is basically fortified by old roman walls. Quite an interesting look for sure, it's very very old. 3*.

Liverpool, England: The real surprise I thought. I had no idea about Liverpool apart from the Beatles. For a tip, when you're at the hotel ask for the cabbie, not the Magical Mystery bus tour. What you get is for about the same price is a private cab with a guy who went to school with the Beatles, going to places the Buses simply can't. If you're good, he'll even take you into a pub that his uncle owns where Paul McCartney had a private cut in room where he wrote a lot of the Lennon-McCartney legends. Also, ask him about John Lennon, and the number 9. I don't believe in those types of things, but this simply has too much coincidence. If you're a music lover, this will teach you a lot about the origins of a lot of what we hear today, and make you wonder just how diverse all the Beatles actually were. Aside from the Beatles, Liverpool is a very old city in itself. You're on the River Mersey (just like Gerry and the Pacemakers Ferry Across the Mersey), and up Water Street and around the CBD is a wealth of amazing history. Let alone the Liverpool/Everton rivalry, or the immense bombathon this city suffered at the hands of the Germans. 4.5*

Cardiff: A load of castles around the area, but here's a good tip. There's a market up on St Marys Street, running up near Cardiff Castle, which has a load of old vinyl records. And when I mean a load, I mean thousands of them. And across from there is another little shopping thoroughfare, which has a shop with a million books, old, new, so much history, and very cheap. 2*.

Paris: The best of the best. Forget the "French people are rude" routine, simply use Bonjour, Merci, Au Revoir and since you show an interest in them, they will show more than interest in you. The great thing about Paris is it's very well set out, and things are quite close together. A lot of the major monuments are scattered around the River Seine. People talk about the Eiffel Tower, but honestly, to me things like Le Oper, Le Louvre, Champs Elysses and Arc De Triomphe were better than that. Le Louvre is a must see, yes, it's the home of the Mona Lisa, but straight across on the other wall is a painting of which the type you'll never see again, ever. It's incredibly huge, so well defined, so intricate. The Mona Lisa itself is tiny, the size of one of those Mechanics shops calendars with the titty women. Aside from the paintings, Le Louvre is an amazing site. The building is huge, amazingly huge. There's just not enough time, I didn't get to Montmatre, San Concreu or the Palace of Versaille which I desperately wanted to, but wow. The spirit walking down Champs Elysses with Arc De Triomphe at one end, and Place De La Concorde at the other, where Marie Attoinette was beheaded, is amazing. Absolute must see. 5*.

Milan: Honestly, didn't even check it out, stayed there one night, was absolutely bemused by the train trip which you see beautiful French scenery, the Swiss Alps, and then when you get to Milan the tracks are surrounded by rubbish and tin shed shantys. N/R. The big site here is their Duomo.

Rome: Very vibrant and colourful. Tight streets, but then again, this city was built how long ago? Some of the top sites here are Fontana De Trevi, Coliseum, St Peters Basilica.. here's another one, Emanuelle Vittorio II, I'm not sure what it is I'm assumign it's an old Palace, but the architecture here is amazing. Basically you make a bee line from the Coliseum, walk past the Forum and Caesars Palitino Hill, and there it is. Do a 90 degree turn, and you head towards Fontana de Trevi. 4.5*, especially given the food and how passionate the Italians are about their food. If you leave early not having finished your plate, they apologise to you, why? Because it's usually momma's restaurant, and momma wants to satisfy her customers, and who are her waiters? Their sons. If you ever want to see family style restaurants, they are here.

Florence: Another amazing hidden jewel. Florence is surprisingly small, and it's in the Tuscany hills. Three amazing sites, the Duomo is incredibly beautiful, the Uffizi with the Statue of David is mind blowing, and Palazzo Del Pitti is a site not often talked about, but it has massive long languid gardens with amazing sculptures everywhere. You can lose a day here alone. THe best thing, the Duomo is five minutes from the Uffizi, and Palazzo Del Pitti takes you over the famous old bridge and is about five minutes from the Uffizi.. by that, I mean walking. Florence is basically Renaissance period, and is completely different to the other cities. Food here is awesome, place call Sabotinnis, if you can find it it has the best Trifle. Not the heavy stuff we've all had, this is soft and creamy and oh my god. 4*. Nothing is ever a rush here in Florence. You just relax, drink Tuscany wine, and enjoy the rumbling hillsides.

Venice: Such a small city, you can walk it, but of course you must go on a Gondola. It's an amazing experience, the bridges are surreal. Everything is water transport. And then walking is narrow winding alleys with every turn offering something new. Best spot is St Marks Square, with St Marks Basilica and the Doges Palace. Near there is the Rialto bridge, which is a site in itself. People here again are very friendly. 4*. It's such a unique, vibrant experience.

Vienna: Talk about a hidden jewel, take a train trip from Venice to Vienna, most naturally beautiful scenery. The houses you see are like old style American barns in size, all near lakes, all near snow. Vienna itself, the only criticism is something they can't help, I don't know really any German and while most speak English, it's generally broken English. German is a difficult language to understand on the run, and thus reading maps can be difficult. One of the most awesome places is Schonbrunn Palace, a massive old style royal palace. The site is just jaw dropping. Vienna's centre is as good as Paris', you have the Opera House where Mozart, Beethoven and the likes worked, you have the Theatre which housed Shakespeare plays in the day, you have an unbelievable Parliament, the Presidents headquarters, and the Museum Quarter. I didn't get the time to go into any of these buildings, but the architecture here is unbeatable so its easy to lose a day just doing that. Of course the Danube flows through Vienna. 4.5*. Austria is beautiful, you've also got places like Salzburg which you go through by train, and you wonder... why haven't I spent more time here? One other word... Schnitzel... Yum. Authentic. And of course, Cordon Bleu from the French influences too.
 

Iafeta_old

Guest
Lucerne: It's against the Swiss Alps, with a big lake in front of it, an old town dating back a 1000 years fortified by Roman walls. Ticking clocks, chocolate, culture, what more could you want? I went up by cable car up to the top of Mt Pilatus, it was a beautiful blue day, no clouds, I could see as far as France and Germany and Austria, many lakes, many towns, a lot of the Swiss Alps and truckloads of snow. I was surprised Lucerne wasn't cold, mid winter, it was like 10-11 degrees. We were told we were incredibly lucky in that sense, although when it snows by a lake it's pretty special anyway, right? 4*.

London: So much to see and do here, we spent a week here and it's not enough. One little tip, go to the British Museum. I know, I know, who likes museums, not me, but this thing is huge and has such things as the Rosetta Stone, the Algin Marbles, authentic Egyptian mummies, a man from like 5,000 years ago, and when I was there the amazing Terracotta Army. The other museums there, the Victoria and Albert and the Natural Museum are stunning. The Natural Museum is sorta like the one in A Night at the Museum. Just the buildings themselves are a work of art. And of course, the great thing about all them... they're free. The tube makes London a very easy city to get around. Go to a British pub in London, particularly an old school one, great atmosphere. Do a play in the West End, we went to We Will Rock You, vibrant cast, great setting, great night. Go to a Premier League game if you can, I got into Arsenal v Newcastle, amazing atmosphere. Take with you a mobile phone that can record sounds and you'll record memories of a lifetime. Some of the other unbelievable sites in this ancient city, Lords, Tower of London, Tower Bridge (don't be fooled, London Bridge these days is just a normal bridge, learn the story behind it before you go otherwise you'll be a bit WTF is this all about), the Globe, St Pauls Cathedral, Houses of Parliament, Buckingham Palace, Downing Street, Trafalgar Square, The London Eye, Westminster Abbey, Kensington Palace... Two of the best sites are just outside the city, Henry VIII's Hampton Court Palace, and the Queen's private residence, Windsor Castle. Massive sites, just unbelievable history. If you ever want to see an amazing garden, Hampton Court Palace will blow your mind. Some people say London is expensive, and it is, but if you use the tube effectively, eat in the Pubs, you will find the necessary money to do the great things like see a play and go to the Premier League. One of the truly great things is things are close to each other, like for instance, the V&A and Natural Museum are 20 metres apart, the London Eye, the Southbank Lion, Downing Street, Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey are like within a 5 minute radius, and mostly, when you come out of a station there's sites steering you in the face. For instance, one night my mate my wife and I did the Original Walking Tour (don't do any others, this is the authentic one of one of the most respected coverers of this topic) Jack the Ripper Tour, which starts at Tower Hill, you walk out of the Station, and straight in front of you is the Tower of London, and in front of you literally is where most convicts got hung back in the day. Even just from a historic perspective of what London was like, and why it is built the way it is, I think it's a great idea to get on the Jack the Ripper Tour. You will learn so much. One other tip, time your run to Madam Taussads, that place is the only place on my entire trip I'd say was shockingly crowded. Don't go on a weekend. Just around the corner, as in Gerry Rafferty, is Baker Street, and just around the corner again, Lords Cricket Ground. 5*.

Please share some of your experiences, I now have the travel bug BADDDDDDDD. If anyone's planning to go to Europe, feel free to PM me, I can help you out save some money and give you some good ideas (I hope).
 

JonB_old

Guest
I haven't been anywhere really... Taupo... lot of water. there is a small chance I could be going to Cambodia to do aid work over the summer. Hopefully that pulls through
 

playdaball_old

Guest
I did the old OE a few years ago seeing a lot of Western Europe, based in England. I've also seen parts of Asia, Turkey, Pacific Islands and Eygpt.

Best places - Samoa, Turkey, Thailand, Yorkshire, West/Atlantic Coast Of France.

Friendliest Folk - Thailand,Samoa, Yorkshire

Best Football Grounds - Old Wembley, Old Cardiff Arms, Elland Rd

Best Food - Thailand, France

Worst Food - Eygpt - I got sick

Best Beaches - Greek Islands, Coromandel, East Coast QLD/NSW, Lalomanu (Samoa)

Best Single Event - Beerfest Munich.

Best Pubs - England, particularly North

Best looking ladies - France, Italy.

Most liberal - Holland
 

Kid-Dynamite_old

Guest
I went to Brisbane and went inside Suncorp Stadium!!! That's been one of the highlights of my travelling career! :D
 

doeboy_old

Guest
Recently went to Japan December actually, for 12 days the most beautiful place I have been too. Kyoto was Beautiful, Tokyo was crazy but lots of fun (Disneyland) went to Osaka but got Ecoli and spent 5 days in bed even after that though it was still the best place in the world to me!!! everybody i met was so helpfull and friendly, The streets are so safe you can walk the streets at 2 in morning with out a worry in the world.

I am planning a trip to Vietnam next!!!!!
 

Iafeta_old

Guest
Awesome stuff guys.

Agree on Brisbane, want to get to that stadium. Emirates Stadium (Arsenal) is absolutely amazing. Very modern, the pitch is a ripper, the atmosphere is absolutely incredible.

Planning on Thailand/Malaysia next year, so pleased to hear good reviews of Thailand.

Doeboy, friends showed us pics of Japan from last year, not wrong mate, it looks unreal. I love their style of architecture, the Geisha tradition, the Samurais, it is a very proud nation. Only thing I don't approve of the Japanese is the whale scientific research...

Anyone done Africa or North America?
 

Jesbass_old

Guest
I've only been to a few places, but here are my thoughts...

Firstly, I hate long flights, especially when I'm heading West. There's nothing worse than 17 hours of darkness, although India looks damn cool when you fly over it on a clear night. (I was able to literally point out Mumbai out the window, because every city had a yellow glow.

Melbourne - The only Australian city I've been to, I stayed there for about a wife for a game development conference in late 2005. I didn't get out to the suburbs, where I'm told the weather gets really hot, and the flies turn up in masses, but the inner city is fantastic. It's really well designed, has great public transport in the form of trams, and the shopping is fantastic. The biggest shock I got is that the people there are actually nice. A real pity, that. It kind of destroyed my "all Australians are rude" theory. Chinatown by horse carrige is prety darn cool, so is going down the Yarra River, and there's a really cool observational tower that lets you see in every direction for miles. Olympic Park is rubbish, but the MCG looked damn cool from outside - absolutely huge. Just beware of the hook turn!

Los Angeles - Spent about four or five days there in January, three months ago. I didn't get to see much, as I was there for a conference, and sunny California was cold and wet while I was there. (Well, it was their winter!) My all time favourite locale was Old Town Pasadena. A heap of shopping, and I caught it on a nice day weather-wise. The people are very friendly, but don't catch all things of the Kiwi lingo. A toilet isn't a toilet - it's a restroom. A taxi isn't a taxi - it's a cab. The Rainbow Bar is a great place, and Lenny Kravitz hangs out there a lot, apparently. Beverly Hills really is like it looks on the Fresh Prince, lol. I walked down Leonard Nimoy's street, although my host didn't actually know which house was his. I hung out at a friend's place in the Hills, and even the more 'modest' homes were thoroguhly impressive. I also had dinner one night at the Blowfish, Matt Damon's sushi restaurant - very good food. The best tip I can offer in America is to respect road crossings. Jay walking, while looking to your right is not advised! I never cared much for any American cities until I went to L.A., and I'd like to go back.

Rarotonga - spent a two week honeymoon there in mid-2004. We were there in the off season, and on the southern side of the island, so the weather was a little bit cool. I still remember on the flight back to Auckland, the pilot told us what the weather was in our destination, and there was an audible groan that swept through the plane - very funny. Rarotonga itself is a great place, and the people are extremely friendly. The culture is fantastic, with the traditional dancing and so on. Trader Jacks is highly recommended for a good feed. We saw a movie in the only cinema, and they had an intermission. After the break, the second reel of the movie got put on backwards! The water is incredibly clear, and we went up on these tiny three-wheeled gliders with engines, (I guess they were microlights of a sort), and flew around the island. Getting a licence is easy - if you can drive to the police station, you've usually done enough to get a licence, which you can use while you're there. Just watch out for the dogs on the (only) road!

Kenya & Tanzania - Spent four weeks there from mid-December to mid-January, 2003-2004. I really, really miss it. One day, I'm sure we'll go back to Africa - we left a part of our heart there. We stayed in the slums of Nairobi for about a week and a half, then spent the next two and a half weeks in Northwest Tanzania, travelling from village to village, staying in mud huts with grass roofs, being fed the local produce (usually goat or chicken). The Nairobi slums were amazing. Every house had broken glass on the tops of walls as a security measure. The local kids would stare at us in amazement. One particular kid would excitedly yell "wazungu" (white people) every time he saw us. The people had so little, but they simply got onw ith life. I experienced no culture shock until the night of the fire. A number of shops/shacks were burned down. The size of the fire was only about 12 metres long, but it still destroyed about five stores. We went into Nairobi that day - when we came back, the shacks were rebuilt. One day later, they were open for business again. The markets in downtown Nairobi are awesome. We've still got a marble chess set and a few paintings we purchased there. The journey to Tanzania was a new experience for me - the first time I'd gone to another country by land instead of air. The people there, (and in Nairobi), are amazing. Kiswahili is the language spoken, and we only knew a few phrases, so we had a translator with us. Each village would kill their most prized animal and serve it up for us. A bit embarrassing, considering they have so little material wealth in comparison to us. A chicken is the ultimate gift, and apparently the head is the most prized part. I ate the neck, but none of us wanted the head - or the feet, for that matter. I miss Africa so much - seeing lightning strike over the horizon of African plains is one of my fondest memories. Plus, Coca-cola is everywhere. In every little shop, in every little village, you can buy Coke. "Welcome To" signs are even sponsored by Coke. Truly amazing.

Future - This year, from mid-August to the end of September, my wife and I will be doing our European excursion, partly as an O.E., and partly to discover my history. So we'll be going to England, (London, Colchester, Paignton in Devon), Wales (Caernarfon), Scotland (Edinburgh, Glasgow, Fife, Highlands), France (Paris, Beaujolais region), Spain (Barcelona), Italy (Venice, Florence, Rome), Switzerland (Geneva, Lucerne), and the Czech Republic (Prague).
 

Kid-Dynamite_old

Guest
I

Future - This year, from mid-August to the end of September, my wife and I will be doing our European excursion, partly as an O.E., and partly to discover my history.
That's finals footy time :eek: !? Will you have access to the NRL in Europe!?!?!? :eek1:
 

Iafeta_old

Guest
Melbourne - The only Australian city I've been to, I stayed there for about a wife for a game development conference in late 2005. I didn't get out to the suburbs, where I'm told the weather gets really hot, and the flies turn up in masses, but the inner city is fantastic. It's really well designed, has great public transport in the form of trams, and the shopping is fantastic. The biggest shock I got is that the people there are actually nice. A real pity, that. It kind of destroyed my "all Australians are rude" theory. Chinatown by horse carrige is prety darn cool, so is going down the Yarra River, and there's a really cool observational tower that lets you see in every direction for miles. Olympic Park is rubbish, but the MCG looked damn cool from outside - absolutely huge. Just beware of the hook turn!

My favourite part of Melbourne is Little Italy, where there's like a line of Italian restaurants where someone tries to drag you into their restaurant just like in European cities. Only been there for a one nighter for business. Sydney has something similar, Leichhardt, but it's not to the same level.

Los Angeles - Spent about four or five days there in January, three months ago. I didn't get to see much, as I was there for a conference, and sunny California was cold and wet while I was there. (Well, it was their winter!) My all time favourite locale was Old Town Pasadena. A heap of shopping, and I caught it on a nice day weather-wise. The people are very friendly, but don't catch all things of the Kiwi lingo. A toilet isn't a toilet - it's a restroom. A taxi isn't a taxi - it's a cab. The Rainbow Bar is a great place, and Lenny Kravitz hangs out there a lot, apparently. Beverly Hills really is like it looks on the Fresh Prince, lol. I walked down Leonard Nimoy's street, although my host didn't actually know which house was his. I hung out at a friend's place in the Hills, and even the more 'modest' homes were thoroguhly impressive. I also had dinner one night at the Blowfish, Matt Damon's sushi restaurant - very good food. The best tip I can offer in America is to respect road crossings. Jay walking, while looking to your right is not advised! I never cared much for any American cities until I went to L.A., and I'd like to go back.

Would love to hit the States. I have a guy I work with who highly recommends hiring a car, and driving. He says the national parks are something else, and the roads are so easy to get between cities on. Very wide lanes apparently. I wanted that to be our next "big" trip after we do a small one to Malaysia/Thailand next year, but Gallipoli 2015 is calling I feel, and I'd love to tap on Egypt after doing Turkey. But I love the thought of being able to go through LA, tinsel town, the beaches, bright lights, to San Francisco with all it's multicultural and sexual diversity and amazing views, up to Seattle for Nirvana and Jimi Hendrix and Soundgarden and Pearl Jam, into Canada for the scenery and nature, back down through the Rockies, to Las Vegas for the casinos, to Texas for the country, to New Orleans for the wild vibrancies, and then fly across and do the other side with Florida's sun and the Everglades, to Washington DC for the history, New York for well... everything, Phillie for it's history... one day, one day.

Rarotonga - spent a two week honeymoon there in mid-2004. We were there in the off season, and on the southern side of the island, so the weather was a little bit cool. I still remember on the flight back to Auckland, the pilot told us what the weather was in our destination, and there was an audible groan that swept through the plane - very funny. Rarotonga itself is a great place, and the people are extremely friendly. The culture is fantastic, with the traditional dancing and so on. Trader Jacks is highly recommended for a good feed. We saw a movie in the only cinema, and they had an intermission. After the break, the second reel of the movie got put on backwards! The water is incredibly clear, and we went up on these tiny three-wheeled gliders with engines, (I guess they were microlights of a sort), and flew around the island. Getting a licence is easy - if you can drive to the police station, you've usually done enough to get a licence, which you can use while you're there. Just watch out for the dogs on the (only) road!

Sounds great, I've never been to the South Pacific islands, and it makes me wonder how often we live near something but never visit it. I lived on the West Coast for 4-5 years and never got to see Milford Sound, it was only when I lived in Australia that I got to see that and Queenstown and Dunedin.

Kenya & Tanzania - Spent four weeks there from mid-December to mid-January, 2003-2004. I really, really miss it. One day, I'm sure we'll go back to Africa - we left a part of our heart there. We stayed in the slums of Nairobi for about a week and a half, then spent the next two and a half weeks in Northwest Tanzania, travelling from village to village, staying in mud huts with grass roofs, being fed the local produce (usually goat or chicken). The Nairobi slums were amazing. Every house had broken glass on the tops of walls as a security measure. The local kids would stare at us in amazement. One particular kid would excitedly yell "wazungu" (white people) every time he saw us. The people had so little, but they simply got onw ith life. I experienced no culture shock until the night of the fire. A number of shops/shacks were burned down. The size of the fire was only about 12 metres long, but it still destroyed about five stores. We went into Nairobi that day - when we came back, the shacks were rebuilt. One day later, they were open for business again. The markets in downtown Nairobi are awesome. We've still got a marble chess set and a few paintings we purchased there. The journey to Tanzania was a new experience for me - the first time I'd gone to another country by land instead of air. The people there, (and in Nairobi), are amazing. Kiswahili is the language spoken, and we only knew a few phrases, so we had a translator with us. Each village would kill their most prized animal and serve it up for us. A bit embarrassing, considering they have so little material wealth in comparison to us. A chicken is the ultimate gift, and apparently the head is the most prized part. I ate the neck, but none of us wanted the head - or the feet, for that matter. I miss Africa so much - seeing lightning strike over the horizon of African plains is one of my fondest memories. Plus, Coca-cola is everywhere. In every little shop, in every little village, you can buy Coke. "Welcome To" signs are even sponsored by Coke. Truly amazing.

THat'd be wicked, although there is a lot of turmoil now in Kenya due to the disputed elections there recently. When I was in Europe it was a huge story that tribes that had lived with each other were suddenly killing each other left right and centre because they gathered the election was rigged. The leaders of the two main parties showed a general disregard for their responsibilities as leaders and kept the fires simmering by selfishly demanding more and more and more and more until it just became a free for all. One day I'd love to go to the southern parts of Africa, South Africa, Namibia, Botswana... sad about the situation in Zimbabwe, I have a coworker from South Africa who says Zimbabwe is great but is just far too dangerous nowadays.

Future - This year, from mid-August to the end of September, my wife and I will be doing our European excursion, partly as an O.E., and partly to discover my history. So we'll be going to England, (London, Colchester, Paignton in Devon), Wales (Caernarfon), Scotland (Edinburgh, Glasgow, Fife, Highlands), France (Paris, Beaujolais region), Spain (Barcelona), Italy (Venice, Florence, Rome), Switzerland (Geneva, Lucerne), and the Czech Republic (Prague).

I'm jealous now biatch ;-) I'm glad you're getting into Spain and the Czech Republic, I really regret not getting there. If you're going to Prague, it's worth noting it's not that far to Budapest (Hungary) and Vienna, and as far as Vienna goes it rivaled Paris and London for me. Vienna is quitessentially perfect if you can get around the German language different. Prague looks like it's similar, very old tapestry of history. Two other spots that have grabbed my eye since I've been back has been the Romance Road in Germany and France in general - look up on the internet for Carcassone, Avignon, Marseille, Nice, Loire Valley in general and you'll see what I mean.

After doing Europe, I'm desperately keen to finish my degree with flying colours, and then move to London. My best mate lives there and the things he has seen... well, it makes me sick to the core ;-) And it's cheap from there too, I remember coming out of the tube at Westminster and seeing airfares to Egypt for 200 pound, for us it's like 1500-2000 dollars.

Let me know if I can be of any help mate, generally the tube systems in the large European cities are first class (London is magic, Paris is great, Rome is great), they're cheap, they're very efficient, and they send you basically to the door step of every major monument and then some.
 

Iafeta_old

Guest
Oh, and I'd be hesitant to drive in Europe... London, you have a congestion tax that you're levied everytime you get near the centre of it (I think from memory its like 8 pounds everytime you cross the lines), Paris and Rome... mate, they drive like nutcases. If you get a chance, go to Arc de Triomphe off Champs Elysses, and just watch the mayhem. Arc De Triomphe becomes a roundabout, with no painted lanes, its like 5-6 cars at a time, trying to cut across each other, and then the ultimate madness, bicyclists are taking it on too!!!!! Quite a site.
 

doeboy_old

Guest
have all you aussie based warriors heard about jetstars huge 4th birthday sale ????
I just booked tickets for me and the wife to go to Japan return trip all taxes for less then $1000 for the two of us we are going mid november:bounce: