General NRL's new brigade young, rich, selfish

BigD_old

Guest
Here's an interesting article from todays Sydney Daily Telegraph which shows that a few of the "new Gen Y" Players dont play for their team. But for themselves.

However, I do think this me me attitude extends across all areas of employment etc and ain't just limited to Rugby League.

Remember there is NO i in TEAM.


https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sport/nrl/nrls-new-brigade-young-rich-selfish/story-e6frexnr-1226347150040


IN isolation, it wasn't the crime of the century. It never is.

Michael Jennings went out on Anzac Day with his brothers, had two alcoholic drinks while playing two-up at the Penrith RSL, then went home.

No harm done.

But Panthers coach Ivan Cleary had heard about Jennings' movements, and when he fronted him, the NSW centre could not understand what was wrong.

Two drinks, on a day when many young Sydney men would be getting home the following morning, was really nothing.

As Jennings might have pointed out, in the past he'd have stayed out all night. As he'd done before.

But the problem for Jennings was that he'd forgotten the club edict of not drinking alcohol while carrying an injury.

He'd forgotten that only last August he'd been forced to buy $44,000 worth of tickets and hand them to fans before their match against the Wests Tigers because he'd turned up to a training session the day before under the influence.

He'd forgotten that he'd been reprimanded as such because earlier in the year he'd been slugged $10,000 for drinking while rehabilitating from an injury.

He'd forgotten that Panthers general manager Phil Gould had sprayed him so much that Jennings' teammates are still talking about it.

Jennings had forgotten he was on his "last chance" and last week he'd painted Gould and Cleary into a corner. Do they sack their highest-paid player or give him another last-last-last chance?

Gould and Cleary managed to dodge the situation by reminding Jennings that he had to meet "certain obligations". Cleary says Jennings has his support. No dramas.

But why would Michael Jennings, humming along on $600,000 a year, do that? Maybe it's because he couldn't care less.

He's not alone.

There's an unspoken and unwritten problem in the game that coaches and officials and senior players will tell you about privately but dare not speak publicly.

As one NRL coach said to me recently: "I've never known a group of players to be so selfish. It's not about the team, it's about themselves. What's in it for me? What can I get out of the game? When I played, the team and my teammates were everything."

It goes beyond the tattoos and Twitter. You can finger it as a "Gen Y" issue, but you can't pigeonhole an entire generation. Young blokes have always been young blokes.

But coaches and players certainly talk about this present generation - not all, of course - of players as one different to the past.

The problem is, coaches are beholden to them. Because as Whitney Houston might have said, they are the future.

"Players are different, because we're allowing them to be different," says former hardman Gorden Tallis. "They can be different for 18 hours of the day. For the six hours they are with you, they have to fit in with you. I don't care how different they are: I don't care what he owns, what tattoos he wears.

"If you've got a great culture, it doesn't matter.

"If they don't fit in, you find someone else that fits in. You can't cheapen your culture."

It is not isolated to rugby league.

Wallabies superstar James O'Connor typified a growing mindset when he described himself as a "brand". Quade Cooper only signs one-year deals because it "motivates" him. To play for his country.

Meanwhile his Twitter feed resembles a blue-light disco.

Last year, Wallabies coach Robbie Deans brushed aside senior players to usher in a new generation, and boasted as much. The result was a World Cup car crash.

There's a yarn doing the rounds in rugby circles about a Melbourne Rebels star leaving jaws agape over his attitude at a team meeting a month ago.

During a team talk about strategy, a senior Rebel was talking about team strategy when the young fella told him to "shut up" and took over.

"I don't remember ever questioning a coach," says Brad Fittler, who had seen the emerging trend of Gen Y while coaching the Roosters.

"They do now. If you don't listen, the player might leave."

To that end, the player manager has become all-powerful. Footballers are "assets", and they snap them up in their early teens and farm them out to the clubs and coaches with whom them are aligned.

If their player becomes unhappy, the manager threatens to take the him elsewhere.

When Gavin Orr, the manager of Manly halfback Daly Cherry-Evans, asked for a release for the Dally M Rookie of the Year earlier this year, the issue reverberated with the Sea Eagles' senior playing group.

They took it upon themselves to make it very clear to Cherry-Evans they had worked for years to earn decent money. Says one senior player: "And here he was asking for the world - after one!"

Mastercoach Wayne Bennett has regularly dismissed the Generation Y theory, saying it is not an issue for him. He treats them all the same.

(Indeed, the spray the 62-year-old is said to have given the Knights players before their match against the Panthers shocked seasoned veterans in the dressing room).

Roosters coach Brian Smith has been coaching for almost as long as Bennett, and he offers this: "It's a challenge to deal with but in some ways the old greybeards have an advantage. The people who notice it the most are the ones who haven't been through it before. Some of us have been through it a couple of times. In our place, the younger blokes are as sensitive to and aware of the team's responsibilities as any of the older players."

Yet the young coach can't afford to be unpopular.

He often doesn't have the luxury of sacking their Next Big Thing.

Says Fittler, who had lost the playing group after losing support from above: "You can lose your job very quickly."

Smith - like many coaches - does believe the brashness and confidence of the present generation shows on the field.

The trend of high scores and a disregard for defence in the under-20s competition is starting to manifest itself in the NRL as the generational change begins.

Maybe Jarryd Hayne - the pin-up boy for Gen Y footballers - led the charge.

The Eels fullback makes about $1 million a year and looks like the best player in the world one minute, uninterested the next.

He tells others he is injured, but then says he is not. He does very little against the Wests Tigers, then effortlessly gets past four defenders to score. He turns up to a recovery session an hour late, says the team is playing in "fear", and then has his teammates deny it.

You sense Stephen Kearney is staring at the ceiling at night, wondering how to unlock the Hayne Plane, just as his predecessor Daniel Anderson did.

"He's a bloke under enormous pressure," says Anderson of Hayne.

"He's not aloof. He's got that many strains and pressure and expectations on him. He's very high-profile.

"He's said to me that kids around the neighbourhood are knocking on his door. He's got to be wary of his people on the affect outside. In Parramatta, I didn't find many who were Gen Y."

Maybe we've got it all wrong. As one prominent NRL coach, who declines to be named, says: "The older they get, the more self-centred and less club-orientated. They expect everything for nothing, and they won't do anything for nothing. Younger blokes are grateful for their opportunity. They don't expect people to fall at their feet to do everything for them."

And maybe coaches need to start dealing with the young player like they once did.

A decade ago, when Gould was coaching the Roosters, a frustrated youngster approached him about not getting enough game-time.

"I'm sick of coming off the bench," the player said.

"I want to start."

"Do you, mate?" said Gould. "When do you want to do this?"

"This weekend," the player said.

"No worries," said Gould.

When the teams were released, the player was shocked to see he was indeed starting. For Newtown. The Roosters' feeder club.
 

gREVUS_old

Guest
i dont think this is as big a problem as the article makes out. company loyalty is to the almighty dollar. And at the end of a day NRL teams are companys that are there to make a profit and stay in business (except for the storm). Players are aware nowdays of their value as a professional and as the only resource they have to offer is themselves they are being careful to ensure that they get the best value for that resource. Because you can believe if the company feels the resource is no longer worth having they will dump it in a heart beat.

If a coach is so weak minded that he cant keep disipline in a training session - well should he be the coach? re "During a team talk about strategy, a senior Rebel was talking about team strategy when the young fella told him to "shut up" and took over.

"I don't remember ever questioning a coach," says Brad Fittler, who had seen the emerging trend of Gen Y while coaching the Roosters.

"They do now. If you don't listen, the player might leave."

re the senior player junior player situation, i remember when i was young and starting out working, just because i was younger than another person didnt make my skills less than theirs (they employed me for a reason). Nor because they were older did it make their knowledge better (doing something the wrong way for 10 years doesnt make it the right way) so if there is a better way to do something it should be said.

In all honesty this sound bite reporting seems pretty useless to me, not knowing if it was a 2nd rower talking and being stopped by a fullback not knowing if it was ....

IMO good on these guys for knowing their value and trying to get it. Oh and re this whole issue who is it tells Gen Y they are worth all this money and then takes a cut of it - the (baby boomer generation) manager by any chance?
 

danpatmac_old

Guest
as a high school teacher, I find there to be many truths within this.
 

surfin_old

Guest
A little hard to believe people with a bad attitude and an over inflated ego were invented in the last 10 years don't you think. Social media just means you hear about it immeadiatly.
 

danpatmac_old

Guest
A little hard to believe people with a bad attitude and an over inflated ego were invented in the last 10 years don't you think. Social media just means you hear about it immeadiatly.

I don't think that is what the article is implying.
One of the key modules I teach is the representation of NZ Youth in the Media and there have been many, many issues of young people misbehaving and lacking humility over time, the most famous in NZ was the Parker/Hulme murder which in part led to the Mazengarb Report of Youth behaviour.

The thing is that in the 50s, 60s, 70s the instances and more importantly opportunities for kids/youth to be demonstratively antisocial were limited due to minimal access to vehicles, wider travel, financial power... in short their worlds were smaller places and so where their lives.

It is much easier now for young people to access the excess in life, to live beyond their means, to follow a more hedonistic pathway.
They are taught that they have the world at their feet through advertising, through social media and through a generation of parents brought up towards the end of a significantly more 'conservative era' of the 60s/70s who themselves were brought up in more 'liberal' households.

It's a gradual process, each generation becomes less conservative and raises a less conservative child who then follows suit... until we have now reached the point where people of my generation (38yrs) have got teens who have been brought up in the world of the 90s/00s and these are times that bear almost no resemblence in cultural and social behavioural terms to the 70s/80s in which I grew up.

The point i'm making is that the child is most often an evolution of the parent and the world view of the child is a progression from that of the parents.
Each generation pushes the boundaries a little further until the boundaries are almost indistinguishable to earlier generations.
 

surfin_old

Guest
I don't think that is what the article is implying.
One of the key modules I teach is the representation of NZ Youth in the Media and there have been many, many issues of young people misbehaving and lacking humility over time, the most famous in NZ was the Parker/Hulme murder which in part led to the Mazengarb Report of Youth behaviour.

The thing is that in the 50s, 60s, 70s the instances and more importantly opportunities for kids/youth to be demonstratively antisocial were limited due to minimal access to vehicles, wider travel, financial power... in short their worlds were smaller places and so where their lives.

It is much easier now for young people to access the excess in life, to live beyond their means, to follow a more hedonistic pathway.
They are taught that they have the world at their feet through advertising, through social media and through a generation of parents brought up towards the end of a significantly more 'conservative era' of the 60s/70s who themselves were brought up in more 'liberal' households.

It's a gradual process, each generation becomes less conservative and raises a less conservative child who then follows suit... until we have now reached the point where people of my generation (38yrs) have got teens who have been brought up in the world of the 90s/00s and these are times that bear almost no resemblence in cultural and social behavioural terms to the 70s/80s in which I grew up.

The point i'm making is that the child is most often an evolution of the parent and the world view of the child is a progression from that of the parents.
Each generation pushes the boundaries a little further until the boundaries are almost indistinguishable to earlier generations.

History also tells us that morals and standards also change regularly, hence Victorian England was very different to 1940s England, a time when the future was alot less certain and people had a live for today attitude that also changed back in the 50's and early 60's, to a time that was much more repressed and then changed again in the later 60's with the use of better contraception. There is nothing new under the sun, because people chose to send "bad girls away to stay with relations" in the 50's and 60's doesn't mean there wasn't teen pregnancies just people pretended there wasn't.
 

danpatmac_old

Guest
History also tells us that morals and standards also change regularly, hence Victorian England was very different to 1940s England, a time when the future was alot less certain and people had a live for today attitude that also changed back in the 50's and early 60's, to a time that was much more repressed and then changed again in the later 60's with the use of better contraception. There is nothing new under the sun, because people chose to send "bad girls away to stay with relations" in the 50's and 60's doesn't mean there wasn't teen pregnancies just people pretended there wasn't.

morals and standards do change, they are set by the people with authority in the society, in this case parents.

Nobody here is claiming that kids have only behaved badly in recent times, that would be an absurd assumption. My point is that as the generations change so do the standards as the standard setters change... our standards have changed significantly in a short period due to the huge effects of social media, the shrinking 'world' and in my experience the most significant, child empowerment.

In my everyday work I deal with entitled, narcissistic and delusional teens who have been mollycoddled at home, have been told they are special continuously and then struggle to work in team environments or refuse to be chastised or criticised as they believe their own inflated sense of worth, importance or value to be greater than or at least equal to their authority figures. This makes the day to day function of house holds and schools and in turn society problematic.

The reasons for this are many but can perhaps be linked with the changes to and development of our modern societal expectations of parents.
The need for dual income families removes the close control that previous generations have had over their offspring and the parental desire/need to empower their kids, to make their kids self sufficient and also interestingly, to counter the perceived restriction of rights that the parents received in their own upbringings all are far more pronounced and common in our modern society, meaning things have definitely changed.

There are more young people behaving in this manner now than ever before, it is clear. There is more opportunity for mistakes and media exposure to this behaviour is massive.
Yes it happened before, but far more were restricted in their behaviours through the cultural boundaries in place... lots of those boundaries are gone and many of those remaining go unrecognised by modern youth.
 

wazzam_old

Guest
morals and standards do change, they are set by the people with authority in the society, in this case parents.

Nobody here is claiming that kids have only behaved badly in recent times, that would be an absurd assumption. My point is that as the generations change so do the standards as the standard setters change... our standards have changed significantly in a short period due to the huge effects of social media, the shrinking 'world' and in my experience the most significant, child empowerment.

In my everyday work I deal with entitled, narcissistic and delusional teens who have been mollycoddled at home, have been told they are special continuously and then struggle to work in team environments or refuse to be chastised or criticised as they believe their own inflated sense of worth, importance or value to be greater than or at least equal to their authority figures. This makes the day to day function of house holds and schools and in turn society problematic.

The reasons for this are many but can perhaps be linked with the changes to and development of our modern societal expectations of parents.
The need for dual income families removes the close control that previous generations have had over their offspring and the parental desire/need to empower their kids, to make their kids self sufficient and also interestingly, to counter the perceived restriction of rights that the parents received in their own upbringings all are far more pronounced and common in our modern society, meaning things have definitely changed.

There are more young people behaving in this manner now than ever before, it is clear. There is more opportunity for mistakes and media exposure to this behaviour is massive.
Yes it happened before, but far more were restricted in their behaviours through the cultural boundaries in place... lots of those boundaries are gone and many of those remaining go unrecognised by modern youth.

:t:t:t:w:
 

BringBackRovelli_old

Guest
Today's kids know their rights. And they have no responsibilities. They are not held accountable and cannot be punished. If they do shit, then it's the parents' or society's fault. Well how are parents to blame for anything when they can't even smack their kids if they do the wrong thing?

All of this breeds a false sense of entitlement and delusions of grandeur.

However, I think usually guys who get to play NRL are usually much better than the average high school idiot. To get there requires dedication, at least some discipline and talent.
 

gREVUS_old

Guest
However, I think usually guys who get to play NRL are usually much better than the average high school idiot. To get there requires dedication, at least some discipline and talent.

i think there is a tendancy in the talk above to miss the point that i quoted here, thank u bringbackrovelli. These are not ordinary kids they are special, they have shown that to get where they are. And the ones telling them they are special are US, the same people that jump on them when they end up in the media.


The kids of today are a mixed bag, the media focus on 1% or less to tell us how bad they are, im in my 40s and i see all the same things in the kids i know that i did as a kid. We had drugs, fights, gangs disrespect to elders etc etc etc. On talking to my dad he will grudginly admit that there is nothing new in the world. Old people have alwayes hated the young

Hers a thought - when i was a kid at school, 2 of my friends left at 15 to go into butchers apprenticeships. They hated school and couldnt wait to leave. My Father did the same thing only he left school at 14. On leaving they started to earn a crust and started to act like adults. Today what is the average age to leave school 18, 18+? so while we treat them like little kids why wouldnt they act like little kids?
 

danpatmac_old

Guest
These are not ordinary kids they are special, they have shown that to get where they are.

Old people have alwayes hated the young

Hers a thought - when i was a kid at school, 2 of my friends left at 15 to go into butchers apprenticeships. They hated school and couldnt wait to leave. My Father did the same thing only he left school at 14. On leaving they started to earn a crust and started to act like adults. Today what is the average age to leave school 18, 18+? so while we treat them like little kids why wouldnt they act like little kids?

I understand what your sentiment is here.
These players and their attitudes are representative of larger issues and to claim that they ARE special because they can kick/catch/pass a football and we pay to watch them is false. They aren't deserving of special treatment. Society has an expectation of standards of behaviour and there are structures in place that determine your place in the world (whether right or wrong). These kids are trying to 'jump the queue' and the issue is that nobody is putting them in their place.

HUGE numbers of kids have this same sense of entitlement in their everyday lives, merely through growing up in a contemporary society that pampers them. It is significantly more than in the past. We all know kids and young adults have always been volatile but there are MORE now than ever who are openly challenging authority and getting away with it.
The rates of youth crime, expulsions/suspensions and violence are higher than any previous period. This is not media beat-up, or the same old same old, this is real.

These footballers could very well have this attitude even if they AREN'T well known players, that's my point.
Lot's of kids think they are special and want special treatment, whether they can play footy or not.

Bottom line, this is a social problem.. and it's not the same as in the past, it has become more common across the board.
 

wazzam_old

Guest
I understand what your sentiment is here.
These players and their attitudes are representative of larger issues and to claim that they ARE special because they can kick/catch/pass a football and we pay to watch them is false. They aren't deserving of special treatment. Society has an expectation of standards of behaviour and there are structures in place that determine your place in the world (whether right or wrong). These kids are trying to 'jump the queue' and the issue is that nobody is putting them in their place.

HUGE numbers of kids have this same sense of entitlement in their everyday lives, merely through growing up in a contemporary society that pampers them. It is significantly more than in the past. We all know kids and young adults have always been volatile but there are MORE now than ever who are openly challenging authority and getting away with it.
The rates of youth crime, expulsions/suspensions and violence are higher than any previous period. This is not media beat-up, or the same old same old, this is real.

These footballers could very well have this attitude even if they AREN'T well known players, that's my point.
Lot's of kids think they are special and want special treatment, whether they can play footy or not.

Bottom line, this is a social problem.. and it's not the same as in the past, it has become more common across the board.

There was a time when there were certain lines that you DID NOT CROSS whatever your intention or backround.
Those times are far behind us now!
I am in my 40's and the world is a far more intense place for younger people to find their place in IMO.
It is little wonder that so many of them are seeking sporting careers. In many cases it is the only thing that they are ' qualified ' to do that will bring them fullfillment and the necessary coin to survive in todays world.
I have an 8yr old son whose future is of grave concern to me! I will do everything in my power to raise him decently and provide him a secure future, but he is completely surrounded by influences that could easily lead him down the wrong path once he decides he knows best!
WE were the lucky ones. :(
 

gREVUS_old

Guest
I cant buy into this attitude, at the end of the day the world we live in was created by us and our parents. Our children are living the life that we wanted for them, obeying or not the laws that we and our parents agreed to, crafted and passed. We were in the same situation when we grew up, our parents the baby boomers grabbed everything in site and took everything that came their way because their parents encouraged it to be so.

The attitudes of the kids today is to put themselves first, society second. Well my family mantra is Family First, where is the difference?

How is the world a more intense place? at 18 my father got drafted to go to Vietnam, he was looking at fighting and dieing for his country, prior to that it was world war II. Todays kids may volunteer to be in that situation, but there is no requirement to be there, no draft, no starving millions like in the great depression. If anything i would say today more people worry less about survival and more about their favorite recreation pasttimes than ever before. While most people spend more on their coffees and cell phones than than some people spend on food over the same period you will never convince me that life is harder, different yes harder no!

And good on you for caring about your 8yr old son, i have a 9yr old daughter and i spend lots of my time thinking about how she might turn out and how to influence that result. Can you tell me have you ever thought about getting rid of your TV, this seems to be where most people believe that all evil starts nowdays. Personally i found that by getting rid of the Newspaper, stopping watching News on TV and listening to an ipod rather than listening to the radio, that the world actually wasnt that bad a place. And im a fireman and spend a fair amount of my time at disaster scenes.
 

¿N. ig-mah¿_old

Guest
I cant buy into this attitude, at the end of the day the world we live in was created by us and our parents. Our children are living the life that we wanted for them, obeying or not the laws that we and our parents agreed to, crafted and passed. We were in the same situation when we grew up, our parents the baby boomers grabbed everything in site and took everything that came their way because their parents encouraged it to be so.

The attitudes of the kids today is to put themselves first, society second. Well my family mantra is Family First, where is the difference?

How is the world a more intense place? at 18 my father got drafted to go to Vietnam, he was looking at fighting and dieing for his country, prior to that it was world war II. Todays kids may volunteer to be in that situation, but there is no requirement to be there, no draft, no starving millions like in the great depression. If anything i would say today more people worry less about survival and more about their favorite recreation pasttimes than ever before. While most people spend more on their coffees and cell phones than than some people spend on food over the same period you will never convince me that life is harder, different yes harder no!

And good on you for caring about your 8yr old son, i have a 9yr old daughter and i spend lots of my time thinking about how she might turn out and how to influence that result. Can you tell me have you ever thought about getting rid of your TV, this seems to be where most people believe that all evil starts nowdays. Personally i found that by getting rid of the Newspaper, stopping watching News on TV and listening to an ipod rather than listening to the radio, that the world actually wasnt that bad a place. And im a fireman and spend a fair amount of my time at disaster scenes.

In my opinion it would be reckless to raise a child without shaperoned exposure to the dangers of the modern world through TV, news and radio. They need to see whats out there before they venture out into it. We expect a lot more of our children now than in the past. We live in a world where you need to be very careful how you act and who you surround yourself with. We live in a throw-away world full of all the evils that go with instant gratification. People do things because they thaught it might be fun. No one seems to consider consequences anymore.

We never had to worry about who we were interacting with. We didn't have stranger danger in our homes the way kids do now. You aren't even safe simply surfing the net as a child. Your parents need to be mindful of where you might end up online, or who may be communicating with you. Even without the sick individuals that kids need to avoid, we all have to be careful about what the person ringing up at tea-time really wants. they say they are trying to fix our computers, which many naive indivduals believe. Then there are the scumbags who are trying to collect our pins and passwords from our computer keystrokes, or our credit card details.

I have 2 daughters, one 9yo this week and the other 5yo next week. I live in fear of what the world will be like when they are older.

We live in a world where half the world is paranoid about what others want and the other half are trying to get something that they have no right to.

Perhaps I sound over the top, but I think everyone should have a small amount of fear for what our kids will have to face. If we don't then they will enter the adult word far too naively.

And I also think we need to teach our kids they need to work for everything they want instead of expecting it. My generation didn't cause this modern expectation that everything is yours if you want it. It was begun by the baby boomers. It is the off-spring from the end of the baby-boom generation who are now stepping into adulthood with this selfish attitude.
 

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