General New Zealand Politics

If there was an election today, who would you vote for?

  • National

    Votes: 7 11.7%
  • Labour

    Votes: 23 38.3%
  • Greens

    Votes: 6 10.0%
  • NZ First

    Votes: 2 3.3%
  • Act

    Votes: 11 18.3%
  • New Conservative Party

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 1 1.7%
  • None of then

    Votes: 10 16.7%

  • Total voters
    60

Noitall

1st Grade Fringe
Aug 21, 2019
2,501
Labour polling company slightly favours the left. National polling company slightly favours the right. Funny that 🤣

"In September the gap between National/ACT vs Labour/Green was a 19.2 per cent. In this October poll the gap is down to 12.1 per cent."

I guess that means people are not very happy with the governments handling of Covid at the moment.
I think the biggest story out of that is a minor party just 6 points behind a major party, with the leader of the minor party much more favoured as prime minister than the major party leader. Looks like it’s mainly men that nationals politics are resonating, with 32% of woman supporting labour as opposed to 19% for national and men’s percentage similar. Could come back to bite national, giving act Epsom all these years since act is polling higher in Auckland.
 

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
10,580

Mates4Life: Tumu Timbers creates suicide prevention programme for Hawke's Bay after worker's death​

A Hawke's Bay company that lost an employee to suicide is rolling out a free suicide prevention programme for businesses across the region.

Tumu Timbers has been developing Mates4Life over the past two years. Administration team leader Bronnie Coory and Hawke's Bay DHB suicide prevention co-ordinator Kerry Gilbert have been at the coalface of it.

Tumu Timbers general manager Jason Truman and Caroline Wilson of A-OK New Zealand have also played a big part in getting it ready for the public.

Truman said it was important for Hawke's Bay to build a regional approach to the issue, as the region's suicide rates are about twice the national average.

In Ministry of Health statistics, the Hawke's Bay DHB had a rate of 20.3 suspected suicides in 2020 per 100,000 people, which is almost double the national rate of 11.3 suspected suicides in the same year.

"It's made a huge difference to our workplace culture by normalising these conversations about how we feel," he said.

It was also important to Truman that the programme was locally based because nationally-led programmes felt fleeting, and band-aids to the issue.

"They fly in and out of workplaces with no people on the ground long-term.

"We wanted to have a homegrown, non-industry-specific strategy here," he said.

A pilot of the Mates4Life programme has already been delivered to 364 employees at Tumu Group and Bostock New Zealand.

Between the two businesses, 49 staff have been trained as connectors, who act in a support capacity for colleagues who are struggling with their mental health.

Another 11 staff have been trained as "safety aiders", who provide support to connectors with intervention strategies, tools and safety plans.

Tumu Group managing director John O'Sullivan said that Mates4Life only requires one intervention to consider the kaupapa worthwhile.

"If we can ensure that a workplace and a family home aren't impacted by the traumatic loss of a colleague or loved one, that's our measure of success," O'Sullivan said.

Bostock New Zealand Group human resources manager Rhonda Simpson said Bostock was grateful to be included in the pilot, as mental health support was crucial in the horticulture industry.

"The feedback from the team is that the session was great, relatable and important. It has certainly raised awareness and started some pretty deep conversations here," Simpson said.

Tumu Timbers created the Mates Hawke's Bay Charitable Trust to secure funding for the Mates4Life programme.

The Ministry of Social Development, the Ministry of Primary Industries and Royston Health Trust contributed a combined sum of $130,000 to help establish it.

Ministry for Primary Industries director of rural communities and farming support Nick Story said he believed in the potential of the programme to reach diverse industries within the region.

"Because the Mates4Life programme has such a strong local flavour it will appeal to all sorts of businesses.

"The foundations have been laid and we are very supportive of the programme which we see going from strength to strength," Story said.

WHERE TO GET HELP
Need to talk? Free call or text 1737 at any time.
Talk to a trained counsellor or call:
the Depression helpline – 0800 111 757
Alcohol drug helpline – 0800 787 797
Gambling helpline – 0800 654 655
Healthline – 0800 611 116 – to get help from a registered nurse 24/7.
Lifeline – 0800 543 354
Samaritans – 0800 726 666

 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga
Huge inflation… highest since 1980’s (excluding GST periods) and its going to keep going higher for a while.

All the structural inefficiencies in the economy about to come home to roost. How did we solve inflation in the 80’s… economic and social pain! Interesting times ahead.
 

Worried2Death

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 6, 2016
3,506
Huge inflation… highest since 1980’s (excluding GST periods) and its going to keep going higher for a while.

All the structural inefficiencies in the economy about to come home to roost. How did we solve inflation in the 80’s… economic and social pain! Interesting times ahead.
What do you foresee happening wizard, 20% interest rates, new rogernimics, market crash, societal collapse? Doesn't sound too good mate, sounds worse than the 80s and they were pretty rough.
 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga
What do you foresee happening wizard, 20% interest rates, new rogernimics, market crash, societal collapse? Doesn't sound too good mate, sounds worse than the 80s and they were pretty rough.
Personal view - it’s partly due to Covid with shipping / production issues and partly due to the tap of immigration turned off. So hopefully we have a rough year or 2 and it resolves. However I think the government secretly want more inflation…

While it is a global issue our government has promoting it through structurally increasing costs everywhere. Inflation solves some problem - decreases debt and pushes up wages. But done wrong in the longer term we could end up looking at needed a smaller Rogernomics solution - basically get back to productivity. The longer the inefficiencies are normalised the worse the pain.

The solution to inflation is to ramp up interest rates and slow the economy down. There are massive limits to this though due to the indebtedness of the economy. You push interest rates above about 8% today and the economy would collapse.

The big worry is the economy is overheated with businesses not making money rather than a true economic boom. You try and slow down a stressed economy and you could get carnage and the dreaded stagflation.

There is record tax take, increases in benefits and minimum wage, huge council cost increases, compliance cost ramping up, petrol tax, extra sick leave, extra annual holiday, etc with no increase in productivity coming home to roost. You risk a cycle where costs HAVE to go up and employees demand pay rises to keep up and it becomes a vicious cycle. On top of that we have a record govt and private debt snookering our options. As long as the government works with the reserve bank we should be fine (130k immigrants accepted is a huge policy shift after shutting down immigration). But I don’t see economic management as this governments strength…
 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga
Article about more flawed regulations in regards to mandatory heat pumps - staggeringly: Official Information Act request was refused because ‘the policy documents that explain the theoretical basis for the model and the calibration of the inputs do not exist’…. Kiwibuild!

Article from a landlord website:

A paper by Tailrisk Economics economist Ian Harrison shows “serious deficiencies in the formula and the supporting analysis” pushing capacity requirements about 30% above standard industry capacity assessments.

He says the heating assessment tool needs to go back to the drawing board.

Landlords must provide one or more fixed heaters that can directly heat the main living room of rented properties.

These heater(s) must meet the minimum heating capacity required. This capacity is determined by a formula set out in subpart 2 of the Residential Tenancies (Healthy Homes Standards) Regulations.

The formula calculates the kilowatts needed to reach a living room temperature of 18°C given inputs on the heat retention properties of the room and an assumed minimum external temperature, which varies by location.

This formula provides the basis for the online heating capacity calculator on the Tenancy Services website.

Harrison says there are serious deficiencies in the formula and the supporting analysis.

“An inappropriate measure of external temperatures has been used.

“Qualifying heaters are expected to have the capacity to reach an 18°C target when the temperature is at its lowest during the year, which is generally at about 6am in the morning when there is an extreme frost.”

“The minimum temperatures experienced during the day and night can be expected to be higher than the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s measure of the minimum in most locations.

“Its approach generates some perverse outcomes. The minimum temperature for Kāpiti is 5°C lower than in nearby Wellington.

“Wellington, along with Kaitaia, is rated as the warmest locality in the country.”

Floor space measure

Critically, says Harrison, the heating capacity formula appears to have been deliberately fabricated, to increase the requirement by inserting a “floor space” measure, which has nothing to do with heating capacity needs, into the formula.

“This has the effect of pushing capacity requirements about 30% above standard industry capacity assessments.

“As a consequence, heat pumps will be required in some small living rooms where they are not economic or technically efficient, and many existing heat pumps, installed on professional advice, will be deemed to be no longer adequate.”

There is no supporting documentation for this “floor space” requirement, says Harrison.

“The response by Associate Housing Minister Poto Williams to a request for this information under the Official Information Act was to refuse it because ‘the policy documents that explain the theoretical basis for the model and the calibration of the inputs do not exist’.

“We found it quite extraordinary that there was no policy document explaining the formula that is at the heart of the heating requirement.”

Harrison discussed the “floor space” requirement with a Tenancy Services policy analyst. He was unable to offer an explanation for the requirement, though he admitted that it did not appear to make sense.
“MBIE appears to have been on a ‘mission’ to force heat pumps on landlords without much regard to whether this was economic or whether heat pumps are an efficient solution for some smaller living rooms.

“MBIE was apparently careful not to commit anything to paper and did not have the formula peer reviewed.”

Formula wrong

He says the heating formula appears to have been deliberately manipulated to increase the heating requirement.

“There was no documentation; no real-world tests were carried out to check the formula, and there was no genuine peer review of MBIE’s analysis.

“As a consequence, heating capacities are typically set 30% or more higher than they should be.

“Heat pumps are being required in small rooms where they are not economic and technically efficient.

“Landlords will be required to install additional heat pumps in rooms that are already being adequately served by heaters installed after professional advice.

“The argument that heating requirements should be more conservative because this is a health issue does not hold water.

“Poto Williams should go back to the drawing board and instruct MBIE to create an accurate and credible heating assessment framework.

“The heating formula in the regulations should be immediately changed to remove the ‘floor area’ adjustment.”
 
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wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga
Labour and National on board for this one.
Good move for the good of the country. There will be some NIMBYs put out but a combined push reduces the political pushback. Housing is a long term issue and needs long term thinking across government to solve. This needed to be done years ago.

It sounds like a good start but the devil is in the detail… can the councils pay for the infrastructure on a building boom?

It would be good to see more collaborative solutions to longer term issues.
 

dean

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 13, 2016
1,344
Good move for the good of the country. There will be some NIMBYs put out but a combined push reduces the political pushback. Housing is a long term issue and needs long term thinking across government to solve. This needed to be done years ago.

It sounds like a good start but the devil is in the detail… can the councils pay for the infrastructure on a building boom?

It would be good to see more collaborative solutions to longer term issues.
What will happen to reserve contributions and development levies? Council's will hate this, have to find another revenue stream.
 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga
The way I see it, the housing problem has always been about housing supply not keeping up with a growing population.

Our governments have had a pretty open immigration policy and have openly said we need population density to be more successful. We have policies to grow big populations in the cities while not wanting to upset anybody so not allowing high density suburbs.

For the last 20 years Auckland has always talked about building up and reinforced this by keeping the urban boundary… while making it almost impossible to do so due to the RMA.

Hence the excessive property prices today. Hence why this policy will make a huge positive difference long term. But it will also significantly change NZ into dense urban cities.
 
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wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga
What will happen to reserve contributions and development levies? Council's will hate this, have to find another revenue stream.
There are still many issues to sort - water connection costs are horrendous. You go to connect to the power network and if you are the unfortunate sucker they pushes the transformer over the limit you alone pay $100k to upgrade the whole street (while not owning the transformer or benefiting when future people connect to it).

Development contributions, building materials costs, excessive building standards that ironically result in poorly built homes. Lack of standardisation, etc, etc.
 

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