General New Zealand Politics

If there was an election today, who would you vote for?

  • National

    Votes: 7 11.7%
  • Labour

    Votes: 23 38.3%
  • Greens

    Votes: 6 10.0%
  • NZ First

    Votes: 2 3.3%
  • Act

    Votes: 11 18.3%
  • New Conservative Party

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 1 1.7%
  • None of then

    Votes: 10 16.7%

  • Total voters
    60

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
19,974
I just listened to a podcast with Jan Dawson of Ports of Auckland.

Just me, but I was hoping to hear some incisive observations about how we are going to sort the ports shambles out.

What I heard was platitudes.

Dunno even why Jonathon Milne bothered. She clearly is a a political appointment i.e. for the Auckland Council bottom line.
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
19,974
That's part of the reason for the changes to target private landlords... the government is seen to be doing something while deflecting attention away from themselves.
One word...Kiwibuild :rolleyes:
 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga
That's part of the reason for the changes to target private landlords... the government is seen to be doing something while deflecting attention away from themselves.

That said, I'm actually very much in favour for rent increases to be legislated to the rate of inflation with one rental increase each year i.e. 1st of April each year, the government announces the percentage increase that is the maximum that can occur within the next twelve months. Make it so that increase can only occur within that year and not added on to the following year's increase... the landlord has to use it or lose it.

When a new tenant comes in, yes the rent can be set at what is agreed upon but can't be increased within the first year. The only time a rental increase should be able to be above the rate of inflation is to cover government mandated capital expenses such as meeting the latest Healthy homes standard and then the increase added so that the capital cost is spread over say four years rent. The landlord will have to justify that increase to the tenant who can appeal it to the Tenancy tribunal if they think it's been unfairly calculated.

Say the landlord has to, in the future, install a solar system as required by the government and the cost for the system is $5,000. That's $1,250 PA when divided over four years so the landlord can increase the rent by a maximum of $24 PW to cover the installation of the system. That's in addition to the annual inflation adjusted increase. Remembering that, in the example of a solar system, the tenant would be paying less for their power each month anyway.
In principle I agree. But:

- who sets the base rate for a property? If it’s upon a new tenancy agreement will this incentivise existing tenants if cost increase to enable the rises to be passed on?
- Rates, insurance, etc would need to be tied to inflation or will undermine the whole system with astronomical increases above inflation and adding up over years.
- what happens in cases of a well maintained roperty vs run down. Does it incentivise less maintenance if it is irrelevant to income?
- what happens if you add a garage? Extend and add a bedroom? Capital improvements above healthy homes?
- what happens in situations where say council takes over supply of rubbish and includes it in rates (increasing them by $300) as has happened in Tauranga?
 

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
10,580

'Horrific': Iwi's fury after houses destined for desperate families demolished​

A Government agency demolished nine state homes a Bay of Plenty iwi planned to acquire for families in "atrocious living conditions".

Kāinga Ora has apologised and the Government minister overseeing the agency says its handling of the matter fell well short of her expectations.

Tauranga-based Ngāi Te Rangi had been in negotiations with Kāinga Ora for more than a year over the plan to relocate the Rotorua state houses to Māori land in its rohe.

Iwi chief executive Paora Stanley said he was led to believe the deal would go through and had told desperate whānau members they would get the homes.

Stanley said the process involved 14 formal meetings, about 22 follow-up phone calls and a pōwhiri with Kāinga Ora that included kaumātua and senior tribe dignitaries on October 15, 2020 - who chose the houses.

But on June 2 Kāinga Ora withdrew from the deal via email.

''The debris I had to deal with after that was simply horrific because we do things on mana. One kaumātua came to me the other day and asked about the houses and I had to say 'I am really, really sorry ...''

Stanley said some of the houses were destined for Matakana Island as ''several people were living in rundown houses with no windows, no running water and no power''.

Other properties were set aside for Rereatukahia, near Katikati, to help a large group of people ''living on and above a swamp''.

''They had no running water or power and were living in ramshackle sheds. One property was going to a family who was couch surfing.''

Others were for several marae and homeless families.

All of the potential recipients knew the refurbishment for each property could go as high as $130,000, he said.

''Considering they had their own land the refurbishment was definitely a viable option.''

Kaumatua were ''excited for the possibility of resolving the atrocious living conditions our people were living in''.

Ngāi Te Rangi sent its final legal recommendations on May 24 this year which had seven markups. These included that Kāinga Ora retains the risk of the dwellings until they left the site and it would be responsible for relocating the dwellings and getting all the required consents.

However, on June 2 Kāinga Ora withdrew from the plan via an email which said ''As has been advised, because of the short timeframes that we have, and the need to move our projects forward in Rotorua, the nine properties originally discussed for relocation are no longer available''.

''We apologise for the inconvenience that this has caused, and look forward to seeing how we can work together in the future to enable our whānau to flourish through living in better homes."

Kāinga Ora Homes and Communities Bay of Plenty regional director Darren Toy revealed in a written statement to NZME this week that "due to miscommunication internally within Kāinga Ora the houses were demolished instead of being relocated for use by Ngāi Te Rangi".

"There were a range of different factors involved here including issues of communication, mismatched expectations, planning and due diligence, both between Kāinga Ora and Ngāi Te Rangi, and within Kāinga Ora."

He wanted to ''personally apologise to Ngāi Te Rangi for this, and for any difficulties it has placed on them and for how this was managed by Kāinga Ora''.

''I understand the disappointment and frustration felt by many people. As an organisation committed to improving outcomes to help realise Māori housing aspirations, Kāinga Ora in this case fell well below our values and what Ngāi Te Rangi could have expected from working with us.''

Toy said Kāinga Ora was committed to working alongside the iwi to help with the housing issues they had identified.

''We are actively looking at different options which could help realise their aspirations. At the same (time) I appreciate it will take time to rebuild our relationship with them.''

The nine older houses were on sites in Rotorua which were planned to be redeveloped to build a larger number of new homes.

Housing Minister Megan Woods told NZME Kāinga Ora's handling of the matter was "not good enough".

''Kāinga Ora fell well short of my expectations in their dealings with Ngāi Te Rangi and did not meet the standards required''.

She had been assured it was an isolated incident and important lessons had been learned.

Woods said Kāinga Ora had assured her they were still committed to working alongside Ngāi Te Rangi but appreciated it might take time to rebuild the relationship.

Putting Māori at the heart of New Zealand's housing response through kaupapa Māori approaches was one of the Government's core priorities, she said.

''I know that Kāinga Ora values its close working relationships with iwi, hapū, and Māori organisations throughout Aotearoa. This includes Tainui, Ngāti Kahungungu, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Toa and many more.''

Kāinga Ora had delivered more than 5000 public homes in the last three and a half years, around 2400 over the past year, with many thousands more under construction across the country.

''Only by working together can we address the long-term housing disparities that have been decades in development."

Tauranga MP Simon Bridges said the demolition of the state homes after more than a year of korero was ''an insult to Ngāi Te Rangi ''.

''Because of this the housing crisis in the Bay of Plenty just got even worse.''

Stanley said telling people there would be no houses took a toll on him and he felt embarrassed, alongside his staff, as the iwi had invested time and money into the venture.

Whanau who were in line for houses were left devastated.

''Promises are being made but they are not delivering. It's a knotted-up bureaucracy that doesn't have vision.

"Kāinga Ora is a big waka with a small paddle.

''They set us up to fail.''

 

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
10,580
In principle I agree. But:
- who sets the base rate for a property?
The owner usually sets out at the start of searching for a new tenant what he is wanting per week for a property. If perspective tenants feel what he's asking is too much they'll either not want the place or receive an accommodation supplement to pay the difference from what they can afford. It's no different from what happens now.

- Rates, insurance, etc would need to be tied to inflation or will undermine the whole system with astronomical increases above inflation and adding up over years.
There are also times when rates, insurance increases don't match the rate of inflation so the landlord makes more money that year... swings and roundabouts.

- what happens in cases of a well maintained roperty vs run down. Does it incentivise less maintenance if it is irrelevant to income?
There already exist incentives for a landlord to maintain a property well... the dreaded capital gain. A well maintained property will sell for more than the poorly maintained property next down. Also, maintaining a property well encourages better tenants to stay. Personally, we took a while selecting our tenants and we charge them less than market rent to encourage them to stay. As a result, they also keep the place really clean and tidy which is better for them as the tenant and better for as us the landlord.

- what happens if you add a garage? Extend and add a bedroom? Capital improvements above healthy homes?
Most landlords currently wouldn't do alterations or additions during a current tenancy. They usually occur in between tenancies.

- what happens in situations where say council takes over supply of rubbish and includes it in rates (increasing them by $300) as has happened in Tauranga?
Just with every other property, the landlord wears the cost. It's part of the responsibility of owning property within an area. And, again, there will be some times when the added expenses are less than the rate of inflation so the landlord benefits those years.
 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga
Stephen Mills is an executive director at Talbot Mills research limited which is the polling firm used by Labour. He is a former political adviser to two Labour governments. Hmmm…

In the reputable Roy Morgan polls: notice the trend before this weak Covid period for Labour…

83189092-2EA6-4003-89A2-FB2B898062F7.png
 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga
- Rates, insurance, etc would need to be tied to inflation or will undermine the whole system with astronomical increases above inflation and adding up over years.
There are also times when rates, insurance increases don't match the rate of inflation so the landlord makes more money that year... swings and roundabouts.
A well reasoned response. Except for the part about rates and insurance ever being below inflation 🤣

 
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Noitall

1st Grade Fringe
Aug 21, 2019
2,500
Stephen Mills is an executive director at Talbot Mills research limited which is the polling firm used by Labour. He is a former political adviser to two Labour governments. Hmmm…

In the reputable Roy Morgan polls: notice the trend before this weak Covid period for Labour…

View attachment 45443
The Talbot mills poll seems fair considering the colmar brunton poll at 27 September had labour at 43%, national at 26% and act at 14%. The graph you included only went to July 2021.
 

Rizzah

Stop Being Shit
Contributor
Apr 18, 2012
5,219
Dunedin, NZ
Stephen Mills is an executive director at Talbot Mills research limited which is the polling firm used by Labour. He is a former political adviser to two Labour governments. Hmmm…

In the reputable Roy Morgan polls: notice the trend before this weak Covid period for Labour…

View attachment 45443
Mills was a Labour political advisor back in the 1980s-90s - 20+years ago.
Doesn't mean he's unprofessional.
Think about it - You'd be a fool to poll using a cooked formula.
 

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
10,580
A well reasoned response. Except for the part about rates and insurance ever being below inflation 🤣

Remembering that rate increase follow the issuing of the new CV from Valuation NZ every four years. That gives the Landlord's three other years when his inflation adjusted rent increases aren't subject to rates changes.

The rates for our rental property are approx. $2,400 PA. A rates increase of 35% would mean an increase of $840 PA or $16.15 per week. That works out at $3,360 over four years.

The annual rate of inflation has just hit 3.3%. At $580 rent per week x 3.3% is an increase of $19.15 per week to $599.15 PW. The second year increase of 19.77 PW puts it up to $618.92 PW. The third year increase of $20.43 PW puts it up to $639.34 PW. The final year increase of $21.10 PW puts it up to $660.44 PW. In total, the rental revenue has increased by $4,183.40 over the same four years or $823 PA above a 35% increase in rates.

Given the insurance we pay on the rental property, insurance would need to rise over 8% PA to eat up the difference. Since we brought the property, our insurance has only risen an aver. of $6.50 per month or $78.00 per year. $823 PA - $78 PA means we'd still be ahead by just under $745 each year even with taking into account increases in rates and insurance.

Anyway, this is not helping me resolve the decking detail I'm supposed to be working on, so I'll leave it there.
 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga
Remembering that rate increase follow the issuing of the new CV from Valuation NZ every four years. That gives the Landlord's three other years when his inflation adjusted rent increases aren't subject to rates changes.
Partly correct. Your PORTION of the overall rates demand from council are calculated every 3 years. The overall rates demand (council budget) still go up every year above inflation.
 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga

'Horrific': Iwi's fury after houses destined for desperate families demolished​

A Government agency demolished nine state homes a Bay of Plenty iwi planned to acquire for families in "atrocious living conditions".

Kāinga Ora has apologised and the Government minister overseeing the agency says its handling of the matter fell well short of her expectations.

Tauranga-based Ngāi Te Rangi had been in negotiations with Kāinga Ora for more than a year over the plan to relocate the Rotorua state houses to Māori land in its rohe.

Iwi chief executive Paora Stanley said he was led to believe the deal would go through and had told desperate whānau members they would get the homes.

Stanley said the process involved 14 formal meetings, about 22 follow-up phone calls and a pōwhiri with Kāinga Ora that included kaumātua and senior tribe dignitaries on October 15, 2020 - who chose the houses.

But on June 2 Kāinga Ora withdrew from the deal via email.

''The debris I had to deal with after that was simply horrific because we do things on mana. One kaumātua came to me the other day and asked about the houses and I had to say 'I am really, really sorry ...''

Stanley said some of the houses were destined for Matakana Island as ''several people were living in rundown houses with no windows, no running water and no power''.

Other properties were set aside for Rereatukahia, near Katikati, to help a large group of people ''living on and above a swamp''.

''They had no running water or power and were living in ramshackle sheds. One property was going to a family who was couch surfing.''

Others were for several marae and homeless families.

All of the potential recipients knew the refurbishment for each property could go as high as $130,000, he said.

''Considering they had their own land the refurbishment was definitely a viable option.''

Kaumatua were ''excited for the possibility of resolving the atrocious living conditions our people were living in''.

Ngāi Te Rangi sent its final legal recommendations on May 24 this year which had seven markups. These included that Kāinga Ora retains the risk of the dwellings until they left the site and it would be responsible for relocating the dwellings and getting all the required consents.

However, on June 2 Kāinga Ora withdrew from the plan via an email which said ''As has been advised, because of the short timeframes that we have, and the need to move our projects forward in Rotorua, the nine properties originally discussed for relocation are no longer available''.

''We apologise for the inconvenience that this has caused, and look forward to seeing how we can work together in the future to enable our whānau to flourish through living in better homes."

Kāinga Ora Homes and Communities Bay of Plenty regional director Darren Toy revealed in a written statement to NZME this week that "due to miscommunication internally within Kāinga Ora the houses were demolished instead of being relocated for use by Ngāi Te Rangi".

"There were a range of different factors involved here including issues of communication, mismatched expectations, planning and due diligence, both between Kāinga Ora and Ngāi Te Rangi, and within Kāinga Ora."

He wanted to ''personally apologise to Ngāi Te Rangi for this, and for any difficulties it has placed on them and for how this was managed by Kāinga Ora''.

''I understand the disappointment and frustration felt by many people. As an organisation committed to improving outcomes to help realise Māori housing aspirations, Kāinga Ora in this case fell well below our values and what Ngāi Te Rangi could have expected from working with us.''

Toy said Kāinga Ora was committed to working alongside the iwi to help with the housing issues they had identified.

''We are actively looking at different options which could help realise their aspirations. At the same (time) I appreciate it will take time to rebuild our relationship with them.''

The nine older houses were on sites in Rotorua which were planned to be redeveloped to build a larger number of new homes.

Housing Minister Megan Woods told NZME Kāinga Ora's handling of the matter was "not good enough".

''Kāinga Ora fell well short of my expectations in their dealings with Ngāi Te Rangi and did not meet the standards required''.

She had been assured it was an isolated incident and important lessons had been learned.

Woods said Kāinga Ora had assured her they were still committed to working alongside Ngāi Te Rangi but appreciated it might take time to rebuild the relationship.

Putting Māori at the heart of New Zealand's housing response through kaupapa Māori approaches was one of the Government's core priorities, she said.

''I know that Kāinga Ora values its close working relationships with iwi, hapū, and Māori organisations throughout Aotearoa. This includes Tainui, Ngāti Kahungungu, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Toa and many more.''

Kāinga Ora had delivered more than 5000 public homes in the last three and a half years, around 2400 over the past year, with many thousands more under construction across the country.

''Only by working together can we address the long-term housing disparities that have been decades in development."

Tauranga MP Simon Bridges said the demolition of the state homes after more than a year of korero was ''an insult to Ngāi Te Rangi ''.

''Because of this the housing crisis in the Bay of Plenty just got even worse.''

Stanley said telling people there would be no houses took a toll on him and he felt embarrassed, alongside his staff, as the iwi had invested time and money into the venture.

Whanau who were in line for houses were left devastated.

''Promises are being made but they are not delivering. It's a knotted-up bureaucracy that doesn't have vision.

"Kāinga Ora is a big waka with a small paddle.

''They set us up to fail.''

So they want something for nothing and get upset when it falls apart…

I quote for jobs all the time and sometimes miss out. You invest your time and money on the hope of making it work. It thought it’s just part of business?

Can understand the upset but when you rely on a giant bureaucracy these things happen all the time.
 
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Dixpat

All in the Brown stuff!
Contributor
Feb 3, 2014
1,762
Auckland
Mills was a Labour political advisor back in the 1980s-90s - 20+years ago.
Doesn't mean he's unprofessional.
Think about it - You'd be a fool to poll using a cooked formula.
Was going to post similar sentiments but thought they would be lost on those who find rocks under every towel

Taxpayers Union have a poll coming out sometime this afternoon
 
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Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
10,580
Last edited:

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
4,851
Tauranga

Results are pretty similar to the Talbot Mills poll.

View attachment 45455
Labour polling company slightly favours the left. National polling company slightly favours the right. Funny that 🤣

"In September the gap between National/ACT vs Labour/Green was a 19.2 per cent. In this October poll the gap is down to 12.1 per cent."

I guess that means people are not very happy with the governments handling of Covid at the moment.
 

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