General New Zealand Election 2020

Who will you vote for in the 2020 election

  • National

    Votes: 18 24.3%
  • Labour

    Votes: 38 51.4%
  • Greens

    Votes: 9 12.2%
  • NZ First

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Act

    Votes: 3 4.1%
  • New Conservative Party

    Votes: 2 2.7%
  • Other

    Votes: 4 5.4%

  • Total voters
    74

Noitall

1st Grade Fringe
Aug 21, 2019
1,554
Is he a dick or what? Where do the Nats find these guys? A leader who opens the door to the press with a farking MAGA hat on full view. Just a dickhead.
He was on Q&A this morning wanting a quarantine facility built next to the airport. Fran O Sullivan was of the opinion it needed to be in a more secluded place. Was very complimentary towards government’s handling of covid, Jack Tame pulled him up and said that seems to be conflicting with his leader’s beliefs.
 

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
8,864
I accept the points you make, they are valid. But, being the PM, having a young child, Covid and a few other things, it probably slipped her mind. To me it is petty points scoring. I would rather judge her on her performance in the job rather than where her Kiwisaver account is invested. It's as news worthy as John Key pulling a pony tail.
JA was made aware in October of last year that her KiwiSaver fund invested in these three companies selling arms to the Saudi military. It was only in response to questions from NZHerald's Fran O'Sullivan stated asking questions again at the end of last week that JA finally asked ANZ through MFAT to "take a look" at investing in those companies. Four months after she was first aware of it and she's only just doing something about after being questioned by a reporter.

Chlöe Swarbrick, from the Greens, was with the same fund with the ANZ and found out as the same time as the PM. She immediately changed to another KiwiSaver provider.
 

Rick O'Shay

Warriors 1st Grader
May 1, 2013
3,547
Understand that but many people did

Bishop is another of the freeloading trough feeding list brigade.

The Air NZ thing sure sounds like a set up to give Luxon a bit of grief.

Seems strange that this became an issue when you consider the overall amount of trade we do with the Saudis on an annual basis.

NZ (Air NZ) has a worldwide rep for turbine work not only the LM2500. Their workshop in Christchurch is state of the art.

Useless information fact: Our Frigates are powered by GE LM2500 turbines. Guess Air NZ works on them as well.
 
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dean

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 13, 2016
1,056
JA was made aware in October of last year that her KiwiSaver fund invested in these three companies selling arms to the Saudi military. It was only in response to questions from NZHerald's Fran O'Sullivan stated asking questions again at the end of last week that JA finally asked ANZ through MFAT to "take a look" at investing in those companies. Four months after she was first aware of it and she's only just doing something about after being questioned by a reporter.

Chlöe Swarbrick, from the Greens, was with the same fund with the ANZ and found out as the same time as the PM. She immediately changed to another KiwiSaver provider.
Fair enough, plenty of time to do something about it . Could be a case of ' do as I say' rather than 'as I do'. That's the mantra for almost every politician.
 

dean

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 13, 2016
1,056
Bishop is another of the freeloading trough feeding list brigade.

The Air NZ thing sure sounds like a set up to give Luxon a bit of grief.

Seems strange that this became an issue when you consider the overall amount of trade we do with the Saudis on an annual basis.

NZ (Air NZ) has a worldwide rep for turbine work not only the LM2500. Their workshop in Christchurch is state of the art.

Useless information fact: Our Frigates are powered by GE LM2500 turbines. Guess Air NZ works on them as well.
I couldn't care less if we maintained every plane in the Saudi Airforce. We fall over backwards to do business with China.
 

john nick

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 28, 2020
1,465
tauranga
Bishop is another of the freeloading trough feeding list brigade.

The Air NZ thing sure sounds like a set up to give Luxon a bit of grief.

Seems strange that this became an issue when you consider the overall amount of trade we do with the Saudis on an annual basis.

NZ (Air NZ) has a worldwide rep for turbine work not only the LM2500. Their workshop in Christchurch is state of the art.

Useless information fact: Our Frigates are powered by GE LM2500 turbines. Guess Air NZ works on them as well.
TBF while I dislike Bishop its more of our electoral systems fault than his all though he and others has taken advantage of it
 

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
8,864

Quake anniversary: Why is Christchurch still broken?

Ten years on from the devastating February 22, 2011 earthquake, which claimed 185 lives and caused widespread destruction, how far has the Christchurch rebuild come? Herald senior journalist Kurt Bayer highlights five central city sites that tell a dual tale of progress and a lack of progress.

The experts, as they are wont to do, weighed in quickly. With the aftershocks still rumbling with the relentless monotony of trucks on a motorway, they envisaged Christchurch's rebuild would take 10, maybe 15, or even 20 years, to complete.

And a decade on, as a quick tour of the English-styled Garden City shows, they were probably about right.

Much has been done, and a lot of it superbly. But it is incomplete, ongoing, yet to be connected, with still gaping ugly lots scattered between shiny new developments.

More than 1300 buildings in the country's second-biggest city were either fully, or partially, demolished.

A central-government driven rebuild "blueprint", devised in just 100 days, was revealed in 2012, outlining 12 key sites for major facilities. It included a new convention centre at a "postcard location" by the Avon River, a huge aquatic and indoor sports facility, and revitalised square with a new central library, as well as shops, restaurants, bars and cafes around sports stadiums to make the revitalised city "very much like Melbourne", according to then Prime Minister John Key.

'A mind-boggling loss'​

Many of the big-ticket anchor projects have been hit by delays.

First, they were delayed by still-shaking ground, and the slow demolition works.

Structural engineer Dr Dmytro Dizhur says Christchurch lost 90 per cent of its vintage masonry buildings, a loss he described as "mind-boggling".

"Every time I go to Christchurch now, I get lost and need to rely on my Google maps to get me around," he says.

Striking, glass-dominant office and retail blocks have sprung up over the past few years, but as Canterbury Employers' Chamber of Commerce chief executive Leeann Watson says, much of the rebuild has been driven by private developers.

"During the initial rebuild period, there was a lot of talk around the risk of tilt slab buildings making the city look like a concrete jungle, however our city developers and investors have gone over and above to create a strong, iconic, interesting cityscape – they had a vision right from the start and followed through," Watson says.

Although some of the delays are understandable, especially with the global Covid-19 pandemic, the slow progress has proved challenging for many businesses who committed early on to invest and rebuild on the basis of the blueprint and the timing of delivering the anchor projects.

'Already world-class'​

But despite the delays, Watson is adamant that Christchurch's central city is already world-class.

In the next few years, Watson cites new, leading-edge amenities including the largest sports and recreation venue in New Zealand, the Metro Sports Facility; new stadium; and convention centre in the CBD – all of which will "rival or surpass offerings in other cities".

"It is important that we don't measure success on what we had – we don't want to be compared to Ōtautahi Christchurch 10 years ago, as that's not progress – we need to be setting new aspirations for our city and region and striving to achieve those," Watson says.

"We also don't want to be compared to Melbourne or other cities, as the earthquake gave us great tragedy 10 years ago, but the rebuild gave us a once-in-a-generation opportunity to re-imagine, re-shape and revitalise the city, which I believe we are making the most of and well on our way to achieving."

THE TERRACE & RIVERSIDE MARKET - COMPLETED​

It's not hard to find the biggest rebuild successes of the new-look city.

Multi-millionaire city property owner and developer Antony Gough was quick to commit to rebuilding the popular pre-quake series of bars and restaurants alongside Cambridge Terrace, overlooking the picturesque Avon River, known then as "The Strip".

Gough began the $140 million hospitality and office precinct in 2013 and battled funding and leasing issues.

But for the past three-plus years, it's helped inject life back into the central city.

It buzzes with shoppers and office dwellers and other inner-city workers during lunchtimes and is packed with partying youngsters at nights.

Next door, across Cashel St, which hosted the globally-acclaimed temporary Re:Start Container Mall for five years after the quakes, is perhaps the biggest success story of them all.

The $80m Riverside Market, which opened in September 2019, was an immediate hit.

Every day, 10,000 visitors visit the seven-day indoor farmers' market featuring 30 independent food outlets selling local produce, meat, seafood, baked goods, coffee and takeaways.

Alongside the market is Riverside Lanes, a boutique shopping area with major fashion brands.

It scooped a big property award last year, where the judges called it a "world-class inner-city retail, hospitality, food and produce market".

STADIUM – THREE-PLUS YEARS AWAY​

Sports-mad Cantabs are still waiting.

Lancaster Park – the hallowed sporting arena with more than a century of red-and-black history - was destroyed in the violent, shallow shaking of February 22, 2011.

A new cricket ground at Hagley Park was quickly pushed through. Ever since the redeveloped and upgraded Hagley Oval hosted its first international in 2014, it's been widely praised as one of the best cricket grounds in the world.

And tonight, it will host a sellout crowd for a T20 between the Blackcaps and arch-rivals Australia.

But where is the new rugby ground? A covered stadium was mooted early on, to deal with the cold Canterbury winters, and be able to host All Blacks fixtures, a rarity in the city since the quakes, along with a range of others sports, musical concerts and other big events.

A site was picked: central city, the old Turners & Growers site, between Madras, Barbadoes, Hereford and Tuam streets.

In the meantime, a "temporary" stadium cobbled out of scaffolding was erected in Addington on the old rugby league showgrounds.

Nine years later, AMI Stadium, now known as Orangetheory Stadium, is still in use but fans have become fed-up with its basic facilities, inadequate weather cover, and out-west location.

After much wrangling, it was agreed that a new 25,000-seater rectangular-turf Canterbury Multi-Use Arena would be most fit for purpose.

The pricetag? A total of $473m, with the Crown and Christchurch City Council having both approved the investment case for the state-of-the-art arena – with the Government putting aside a $220m contribution from the Christchurch Regeneration Acceleration Fund.

Early construction work on the cleared CBD site should begin sometime this year, the city council says.

Project director Kris Thomas says they are in the process of "evaluating the main contractor proposals" for the stadium's design and construction and should be announced in April.

It should be finished by the end of 2024.

CATHEDRAL – STILL AT LEAST SIX YEARS AWAY​

The Gothic-style Christ Church Cathedral was once the postcard face of the city.

Today, it remains so, but for all the wrong reasons.

The 140-year-old Anglican cathedral, which withstood violent earthquakes in 1881, 1888, 1922, 1901 and even September 4, 2010, was badly damaged on February 22.

Its spire snapped in half, towers wrecked, and stonework came crumbling down.

The building has lain in ruin ever since.

Debate has raged over whether it should have been torn down and replaced with a new build; replaced by a replica; or painstakingly put back together.

In 2017, the Anglican Synod finally made a decision: they would reinstate the building, at an estimated cost of $104m.

The project costs have already blown out to $154m.

Project director Keith Paterson says they are "about halfway" through stabilisation work which will take another 18 months or so before the main strengthening and reinstatement work can safely begin.

"The current programme is to complete the entire project including the main cathedral, tower, visitors' centre, and cathedral centre by the middle of 2027."

The cathedral and tower will "look much as it did before" but will be reinstated to modern standards, including seismic strengthening and base isolation, heating and electrical systems and refurbished pipe organ.

"This building will not only be a wonderful place to worship or gather, it will re-emerge as a positive symbol of our city commanding a dominant position in Cathedral Square," Paterson says.

CONVENTION CENTRE – ALMOST COMPLETE​

The city's new convention centre has been rising like a concrete Phoenix for the past few years.

Every day, about 500 construction workers beaver away on the 28,000sq m building, aiming to have it finished by the middle of the year.

The first events for Te Pae Christchurch Convention Centre should be held towards the end of the year.

The project has been beleaguered by delays, including the global Covid-19 pandemic.

But it is hoped that venue, which will have capacity to hold simultaneous events and host up to 2000 delegates for a single conference, will help bring back visitors in big numbers to the recovering region.

METRO SPORTS FACILITY – COMPLETED NEXT YEAR​

A generation of kids have grown up in the city without many things taken for granted in other centres.

Christchurch's long-awaited Metro Sports Facility is expected to be open around the end of next year and will fill many of the gaps ripped apart by the quakes.

The $300m facility will be the largest aquatic and indoor recreation and leisure venue of its kind in New Zealand, catering for all ages and abilities, including high-performance sport.

It will be run by the city council but is being built by Ōtākaro, the Crown-owned company delivering the central city anchor projects that the Government committed to after the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquakes.

Plans also include five hydroslides, with the "Looping Rocket" sending riders hurtling down a slide at around 40km/h.

The vast construction site - within Moorhouse Ave, Stewart St, St Asaph St and Antigua St – is a hive of activity.

It is set to open next year.

 
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Rizzah

Stop Being Shit
Contributor
Apr 18, 2012
3,949
Dunedin, NZ
Are these numbers massive or have I simply not been paying attention?

Reserve Bank figures show 45% of the $9.6b of new lending into the housing market in the month of December was to landlords, while just $1.7b went to first home buyers.
Demand for mortgages is so strong ANZ has stopped taking online applications and BNZ will only deal with existing customers.
 

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
8,864
Are these numbers massive or have I simply not been paying attention?

Reserve Bank figures show 45% of the $9.6b of new lending into the housing market in the month of December was to landlords, while just $1.7b went to first home buyers.
Demand for mortgages is so strong ANZ has stopped taking online applications and BNZ will only deal with existing customers.
Almost as scary as this is that the banks have stopped borrowing to people doing developments meaning people who wanted to subdivide their sections are no longer able to get funding unless they have a 50% deposit. It's also affecting smaller builders/developers who are now having to go to "non-banking" institutions to borrow at higher interest rates. Higher holding costs while developments are completed leads to higher prices and more housing inflation.

At a time when there needs to be a greater supply of housing in order to cool the market down, the exact opposite is happening. Although the January house values released by the REINZ showed a $25,000 drop in values from the Auckland figures in December, Real Estate agents and auctions are already saying they're seeing a huge up swing in values for the sales so far in February. That $25,000 has already been passed and we're only 3/4's of the way through the month.
 

Rizzah

Stop Being Shit
Contributor
Apr 18, 2012
3,949
Dunedin, NZ
Crazy.
Is there actually a serious housing supply issue - or are the market gains creating a self perpetuating crisis due to investment FOMO because returns are so good?
There are clearly houses to buy out there if we are spending 9.6billion a month in mortgages.
If owner-occupiers are having to compete with existing landlords for properties won't it always seem like there isn't enough houses?

Does that even make sense :D
 

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
8,864
Crazy.
Is there actually a serious housing supply issue - or are the market gains creating a self perpetuating crisis due to investment FOMO because returns are so good?
There are clearly houses to buy out there if we are spending 9.6billion a month in mortgages.
If owner-occupiers are having to compete with existing landlords for properties won't it always seem like there isn't enough houses?

Does that even make sense :D
Just on the Auckland market. Five years ago I was looking on TradeMe for a piece of land a church was wanting to buy in the Flat Bush area of south/east Auckland. There was over 200 listings for land for sale (both sections and lifestyle blocks) just in the Flat Bush area. Just did a quick TradeMe search and there's currently 64 sections/lifestyle blocks listed for the entire area that was Manukau City.

A major problem is that both central and local government are restricting the allocation of sections in their joint venture developments to 15 large building companies. This has meant smaller builders who would buy a few sections each year to do spec. builds on in the new subdivisions can't - those subdivisions still selling to smaller builders are now pushing their asking price up because the demand is far exceeding the supply. They are now being forced to compete with the small to medium sized developers buying in established areas to either do infill housing or removing an existing house to provide multiple new houses.

Add to that the Auckland Unitary Plan which removed minimum section sizes and density requirements and some properties have leapt in value as a single house can now be replaced by multiple terrace houses and apartments.

Add to that, as you're said, FOMO where developers, new home buyers and investors are scared of missing out, and you have prefect conditions for housing inflation which will only reduce when there is a greater supply to the market from both developers and sellers who think the market is about to turn and they'll miss out on "record prices" if they don't sell now.

Then the market will hit it's steady cycle for a few years until it all kicks off again. Each cycle tends to last between 7-10 years which is why, since the 1970's, no matter which government is in power, houses have doubled in value every 7-10 years.
 
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Rizzah

Stop Being Shit
Contributor
Apr 18, 2012
3,949
Dunedin, NZ
A really interesting documentary on Netflix about combating climate change / CO2 sequestering via soil health and regenerative agriculture (something we could readily implement in NZ).

 
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bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
16,061
A really interesting documentary on Netflix about combating climate change / CO2 sequestering via soil health and regenerative agriculture (something we could readily implement in NZ).

The knowledge and science is all there, believe me, it is just the will to do it.
 

Sup42

Warriors 1st Grader
May 7, 2012
18,097
Standard and Poors has given NZ a AA+ credit rating, the second highest rating available, with positive projections for economic growth.

This was a Covid specific calculation.

So, we have been upgraded by the S and P rather than marked down post the start of the pandemic.

Remarkable. Well done Labour.
 

john nick

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 28, 2020
1,465
tauranga
Standard and Poors has given NZ a AA+ credit rating, the second highest rating available, with positive projections for economic growth.

This was a Covid specific calculation.

So, we have been upgraded by the S and P rather than marked down post the start of the pandemic.

Remarkable. Well done Labour.
Certainly in direct contrast to all the naysayers on this site and in the media. The REINZ and CEO Thompson from Barefoot and Thompson predicted that the arse would fall out of Real estate in NZ if covid ever arrived here. However they continue to make predictions and continue to be wrong.
 
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wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
2,908
Tauranga
Certainly in direct contrast to all the naysayers on this site and in the media. The REINZ and CEO Thompson from Barefoot and Thompson predicted that the arse would fall out of Real estate in NZ if covid ever arrived here. However they continue to make predictions and continue to be wrong.
To be fair, Covid was never here like the US, UK, Europe, etc. It gets here and we lock it back out again.

Being Covid free has given stability and certainty to support the economy. With the reserve banks support we actually have record housing and stock market prices.
 

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