Player Kieran Foran

bruce

bruce

Contributor
I woul$nt be so hard on his sons, they’re doing okay now.
I remember KF as an overpaid and under performing waste of time who God Doyle used as an excuse to try and bluff the fans that he was actually doing something to progress the club. Maybe he was just covering the fact that Watson was a tight arse. I don't wish Kieran Foran anything but the best but only out of decency, no sense of any loyalty from a fan.
how can he be such a great person when his company is listed as not providing its workers with a living wage, forcing them to be reliant on government handouts, even though they work 40 hour working weeks.
https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/a...e-real-reason-walmart-raised-its-minimum-wage
https://www.thenation.com/article/walmart-wages-are-the-main-reason-people-depend-on-food-stamps/
That article is from 2016. It smacks of a socialist whinge such as we hear from the liberal element in NZ.

I am not really a right winger, and I think very few Kiwis would ever support the US GOP. However the market pays what it has to. Anymore than that is a donation and as wages are usually one of the most expensive items businesses cannot afford donations on that scale.

The US has to compete with wages and conditions in Asia, and if they think the low paid get it tough in the US they should try China, India or South East Asia. So Greg Foran has very little control over wages in that competitive market.

I notice in NZ now that many lower paid workers are forced into part time (if they can be called that) contracts that give the employer the ability to give them more work if it is available. The lower managers will of course give that time to workers they like, and hopefully that is because they are better workers. If a worker doesn't work hard he will starve or find something else.
Sounds like a shit dad tho
On the face of it it does. However we don't know the other side of the equation do we?
 
gREVUS

gREVUS

Long live the Rainbows and Butterflies
Contributor
I remember KF as an overpaid and under performing waste of time who God Doyle used as an excuse to try and bluff the fans that he was actually doing something to progress the club. Maybe he was just covering the fact that Watson was a tight arse. I don't wish Kieran Foran anything but the best but only out of decency, no sense of any loyalty from a fan.

That article is from 2016. It smacks of a socialist whinge such as we hear from the liberal element in NZ.

I am not really a right winger, and I think very few Kiwis would ever support the US GOP. However the market pays what it has to. Anymore than that is a donation and as wages are usually one of the most expensive items businesses cannot afford donations on that scale.

The US has to compete with wages and conditions in Asia, and if they think the low paid get it tough in the US they should try China, India or South East Asia. So Greg Foran has very little control over wages in that competitive market.

I notice in NZ now that many lower paid workers are forced into part time (if they can be called that) contracts that give the employer the ability to give them more work if it is available. The lower managers will of course give that time to workers they like, and hopefully that is because they are better workers. If a worker doesn't work hard he will starve or find something else.

On the face of it it does. However we don't know the other side of the equation do we?
i think you have it wrong, the US sales and service people do not have to compete with workers in another country. They just have to sell the shit that was made in another country just like they do in NZ and Aus. the difference is that both countries have a better minimum wage and a social system that provides a minimum level of health care excreta. The US does not, and therefore requires a higher minimum wage. Realistically trying to justify a poor situation by quoting an almost as bad situation as an equivalent doesnt work for me. I believe that any employee that works 40 hours a week should be able to feed his/her family. If this isnt happening because of corporate manipulation of the rules then something is wrong with the company and people should stop buying from it. Its how i deal with it anyway.
 
Tonbridge (Swanley)

Tonbridge (Swanley)

i think you have it wrong, the US sales and service people do not have to compete with workers in another country. They just have to sell the shit that was made in another country just like they do in NZ and Aus. the difference is that both countries have a better minimum wage and a social system that provides a minimum level of health care excreta. The US does not, and therefore requires a higher minimum wage. Realistically trying to justify a poor situation by quoting an almost as bad situation as an equivalent doesnt work for me. I believe that any employee that works 40 hours a week should be able to feed his/her family. If this isnt happening because of corporate manipulation of the rules then something is wrong with the company and people should stop buying from it. Its how i deal with it anyway.
Agree and waiting staff also rely on tips for additional income as well, people are paid low wages to increase profits for shareholders ...it's as simple as that.
 
Worried2Death

Worried2Death

... are you Bruce Russell?
Who?
He runs an overnight talkback show on newstalkzb for angry old codgers to shout at clouds. I know you don't really fit that description Bruce, as much as you like to play the part. You should get in on it though, you've earned the right to set em straight at your age, it could be your last chance.

Good luck Foz for whatever it is you're doing.
 
Last edited:
Ref

Ref

I'll get it back on track. High quality player at Manly, albeit surrounded by high class players, and he played well for the Kiwis.

Unfortunately his speed is gone. That severely impacts on his attack and defensively there were a few times where I saw him leave the gate open on the inside because it appeared he didn't trust his pace to show the attacker the outside and they score.

Still plays as hard as before so he still got my respect.
 
bruce

bruce

Contributor
Mods FYI...Kieran Foran is mentioned in this article. :happy:
How Air New Zealand's new boss changed Australia's supermarket landscape
Greg Foran has certainly been one of Australia’s most successful exports. He is among only a small handful of executives who have made it big in the US market - both as the head of Walmart’s US operations and the person credited with leading the company’s revival.
That chapter of Foran’s career is about to close as he is set to return to his native New Zealand to take on that country’s highest-profile corporate job - the head of Air New Zealand.
But the trajectory or at least the shape of Foran’s career could have been very different.
It was eight years ago in 2011 when the board of Australia’s largest retailer, Woolworths, was faced with a crucial decision. The departure of its then chief executive Mike Luscombe left directors with a choice of two internal candidates to replace him.

For those outside the inner sanctum, the money was on Foran. He ran its largest division - supermarkets - and was highly regarded.
The other contender was Grant O’Brien who, as chief operating officer of food and petrol, reported to Foran.
The backdrop of the times is vital to understanding the gravity of the decision the board needed to make.
Having spoken to people close to the situation, I have been told the pitches delivered by O’Brien and Foran were very different.



Both understood that Woolworths’ arch-rival Coles, which two years earlier had been acquired by Perth conglomerate Wesfarmers, had begun to nip at its heels. From a clapped out also-ran supermarket chain Coles had begun heavily discounting prices, was gaining sales momentum and fast becoming a real contender and a threat to Woolworths.


For those outside the inner sanctum, the money was on Foran. He ran its largest division - supermarkets - and was highly regarded.
The other contender was Grant O’Brien who, as chief operating officer of food and petrol, reported to Foran.
The backdrop of the times is vital to understanding the gravity of the decision the board needed to make.
Having spoken to people close to the situation, I have been told the pitches delivered by O’Brien and Foran were very different.



Both understood that Woolworths’ arch-rival Coles, which two years earlier had been acquired by Perth conglomerate Wesfarmers, had begun to nip at its heels. From a clapped out also-ran supermarket chain Coles had begun heavily discounting prices, was gaining sales momentum and fast becoming a real contender and a threat to Woolworths.

The story goes that Foran’s pitch for the top job included an argument that Woolworths would need to invest in re-basing its prices to regain its momentum and that this would involve a large one-off hit to profits.
O’Brien apparently told the board that Woolworths’ momentum could be restored without a profit hit. This was a plan the board found compelling.
History has made its verdict on O’Brien’s strategy.

O’Brien was CEO when Woolworths’ sales and market share were seriously challenged by Coles. He was the architect of its disastrous plan to open the Masters chain of home improvement stores. This decision ultimately burned through $2 billion of Woolworths' capital and the division racked up more than $600 million of losses.
Foran, whose thoughts on Masters have never been made public, ultimately left Woolworths in the months following his unsuccessful bid for the top job.
O’Brien held the top job for four years and his resignation was made in the months following a disappointing half-year December result and mounting losses from Masters.
In early 2016 O’Brien was replaced by Brad Banducci who ultimately pursued a similar strategy to the one Foran had proposed five years earlier. Its success has been increasingly evident since. Woolworths recaptured market share and with one exception has beaten Coles on sales growth since the first quarter of 2017.
Foran initially took a senior role in Walmart’s China operations to earn his stripes. And after a few years was elevated to running its US businesses - a job that earned him $US13.4 million ($20 million) in 2019.



In the US he has been credited as being responsible for three straight years of increases in quarterly same-store sales at Walmart.
Reports out of the US say that when Foran arrived at Walmart the company was under threat from competitors such as Aldi and Dollar General whose prices were lower.
Interestingly Foran applied the same strategy to Walmart that he had proposed to the Woolworths board a few years earlier. He cleaned up the stores, improved product availability and invested billions in cutting prices.
His unexpected departure from Walmart, however, has raised eyebrows. It was announced amid recent well-publicised tension between Foran and Walmart’s e-commerce chief Marc Lore.

Earlier this week Lore reportedly told a gathering at a New York conference of the "frustration and tension" between the two executives.
But most believe Foran’s decision to move to New Zealand was more about moving back home.
(His son Kieran Foran is a rugby league player who represented New Zealand).
But this career move will take him from a big fish in a big pond to a huge fish in a tiny pond.



Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Kieran Foran was a former rugby league player. Foran currently plays as a five-eighth and halfback for the Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs.
 
mt.wellington

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Contributor
Mods FYI...Kieran Foran is mentioned in this article. :happy:
How Air New Zealand's new boss changed Australia's supermarket landscape
Greg Foran has certainly been one of Australia’s most successful exports. He is among only a small handful of executives who have made it big in the US market - both as the head of Walmart’s US operations and the person credited with leading the company’s revival.
That chapter of Foran’s career is about to close as he is set to return to his native New Zealand to take on that country’s highest-profile corporate job - the head of Air New Zealand.
But the trajectory or at least the shape of Foran’s career could have been very different.
It was eight years ago in 2011 when the board of Australia’s largest retailer, Woolworths, was faced with a crucial decision. The departure of its then chief executive Mike Luscombe left directors with a choice of two internal candidates to replace him.

For those outside the inner sanctum, the money was on Foran. He ran its largest division - supermarkets - and was highly regarded.
The other contender was Grant O’Brien who, as chief operating officer of food and petrol, reported to Foran.
The backdrop of the times is vital to understanding the gravity of the decision the board needed to make.
Having spoken to people close to the situation, I have been told the pitches delivered by O’Brien and Foran were very different.



Both understood that Woolworths’ arch-rival Coles, which two years earlier had been acquired by Perth conglomerate Wesfarmers, had begun to nip at its heels. From a clapped out also-ran supermarket chain Coles had begun heavily discounting prices, was gaining sales momentum and fast becoming a real contender and a threat to Woolworths.


For those outside the inner sanctum, the money was on Foran. He ran its largest division - supermarkets - and was highly regarded.
The other contender was Grant O’Brien who, as chief operating officer of food and petrol, reported to Foran.
The backdrop of the times is vital to understanding the gravity of the decision the board needed to make.
Having spoken to people close to the situation, I have been told the pitches delivered by O’Brien and Foran were very different.



Both understood that Woolworths’ arch-rival Coles, which two years earlier had been acquired by Perth conglomerate Wesfarmers, had begun to nip at its heels. From a clapped out also-ran supermarket chain Coles had begun heavily discounting prices, was gaining sales momentum and fast becoming a real contender and a threat to Woolworths.

The story goes that Foran’s pitch for the top job included an argument that Woolworths would need to invest in re-basing its prices to regain its momentum and that this would involve a large one-off hit to profits.
O’Brien apparently told the board that Woolworths’ momentum could be restored without a profit hit. This was a plan the board found compelling.
History has made its verdict on O’Brien’s strategy.

O’Brien was CEO when Woolworths’ sales and market share were seriously challenged by Coles. He was the architect of its disastrous plan to open the Masters chain of home improvement stores. This decision ultimately burned through $2 billion of Woolworths' capital and the division racked up more than $600 million of losses.
Foran, whose thoughts on Masters have never been made public, ultimately left Woolworths in the months following his unsuccessful bid for the top job.
O’Brien held the top job for four years and his resignation was made in the months following a disappointing half-year December result and mounting losses from Masters.
In early 2016 O’Brien was replaced by Brad Banducci who ultimately pursued a similar strategy to the one Foran had proposed five years earlier. Its success has been increasingly evident since. Woolworths recaptured market share and with one exception has beaten Coles on sales growth since the first quarter of 2017.
Foran initially took a senior role in Walmart’s China operations to earn his stripes. And after a few years was elevated to running its US businesses - a job that earned him $US13.4 million ($20 million) in 2019.



In the US he has been credited as being responsible for three straight years of increases in quarterly same-store sales at Walmart.
Reports out of the US say that when Foran arrived at Walmart the company was under threat from competitors such as Aldi and Dollar General whose prices were lower.
Interestingly Foran applied the same strategy to Walmart that he had proposed to the Woolworths board a few years earlier. He cleaned up the stores, improved product availability and invested billions in cutting prices.
His unexpected departure from Walmart, however, has raised eyebrows. It was announced amid recent well-publicised tension between Foran and Walmart’s e-commerce chief Marc Lore.

Earlier this week Lore reportedly told a gathering at a New York conference of the "frustration and tension" between the two executives.
But most believe Foran’s decision to move to New Zealand was more about moving back home.
(His son Kieran Foran is a rugby league player who represented New Zealand).
But this career move will take him from a big fish in a big pond to a huge fish in a tiny pond.



Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Kieran Foran was a former rugby league player. Foran currently plays as a five-eighth and halfback for the Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs.
So Greg is Australian 👀???
 

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