General Heat Thread

koolkat

1st Grade Fringe
May 18, 2012
2,776
Nelson
caveman creating fire . not sure what that's got to do with the Warriors not handling the heat.wich is a cop out anyway ,and aren't the Warriors all Bros from the islands.and I'm sure the islands are hot right.so your theory on Warriors not handling heat needs more investigation lol
 

jonno

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 13, 2014
9,804
caveman creating fire . not sure what that's got to do with the Warriors not handling the heat.wich is a cop out anyway ,and aren't the Warriors all Bros from the islands.and I'm sure the islands are hot right.so your theory on Warriors not handling heat needs more investigation lol
It's not a theory about them not handling it.

I'm not saying they can't handle the heat.

But I am saying the don't...

And I think we all adjust to the environment we live in. So Islanders living in the Islands have no problems with Australia, but Islanders living in Southland do...

Just like White people who live in the Islands are fine with the temperature, and they actually quite enjoy it..
 

Sup42

Warriors 1st Grader
May 7, 2012
16,486
Australian heat hardens you off

Ive played in it.

The first time is mind blowing,the actual air burns.

But on the positive side you get fit faster and weight control is much easier over there.

When you aclimatise....you find you are able to work harder, and it;s very healthy for you body.

The stink thing I imagine is having to come home and lose the challenging systems week by week,,,,no consistency.

The Warrios should find a way to spend more time in Aus than at home.
 

Swanley

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 13, 2012
2,629
Tonbridge, Kent, UK
I find when it's hot and playing sport, controlling your breathing is important, helps with not over heating...and sometimes cooling down results in you overheating too quickly again!

And yes, there is a difference between Heat and Humidity.....
 
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jonno

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 13, 2014
9,804
Humans are very sensitive to humidity, as the skin relies on the air to get rid of moisture. The process of sweating is your body's attempt to keep cool and maintain its current temperature. If the air is at 100-percent relative humidity, sweat will not evaporate into the air. As a result, we feel much hotter than the actual temperature when the relative humidity is high. If the relative humidity is low, we can feel much cooler than the actual temperature because our sweat evaporates easily, cooling us off. For example, if the air temperature is 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 degrees Celsius) and the relative humidity is zero percent, the air temperature feels like 69 degrees Fahrenheit (21 C) to our bodies. If the air temperature is 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 C) and the relative humidity is 100 percent, we feel like it's 80 degrees (27 C) out.
 
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jonno

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 13, 2014
9,804
What Happens With Acclimatization?
You Become A Better Sweater
After acclimatizing to exercise in the heat we begin to sweat earlier, we sweat more and at a faster rate, our sweat glands fatigue less and the body better distributes sweat. There’s also less sodium content in the sweat, which helps with water retention and maintaining fluid levels to prevent dehydration. The result of better sweating is better cooling, meaning skin and core temperatures stay within reason and early fatigue, hyperthermia and heat illness are less likely. Fluid intake is essential to maintain these functions (see “Role of hydration” below).

Cardiovascular Function Improves
Benefits include a decrease in heart rate, increase in plasma volume and improved blood flow. With more plasma, there’s more blood available to go to the skin’s surface for heat dissipation and to the working muscles. Most important, adaptations put less stress on the heart, resulting in a decrease in heart rate at any given intensity and increase in stroke volume (amount of blood pumped out of the heart chamber).

Exercise Performance Increases
The non-acclimatized person will run slower and fatigue faster in heat; but, as acclimatization takes place, these negative effects will fade and running capacity and performance will increase due to improved thermal comfort and lower perceived exertion.


Read more at https://running.competitor.com/2014...ization-for-runners_12035#G7Rz8Aj3GKgEb3Tk.99
 
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Stone

1st Grade Fringe
May 19, 2012
1,149
Auckland
Despite my initial tongue in cheek post (edit: weally ? deleted ? c'mon ! there goes my idea to post the late great Glen Frey's The Heat is On music vid then lol) I think there definitely could be something to this

I can remember when I first went to Brisbane, walked out of the air conditioned plane, through the air conditioned airport terminal through the sliding doors & BOOM!!! ... I felt like I had literally walked into a microwave oven & this was in late winter-early spring

Dave is definitely right too ... the hot air can feel like it's literally burning your lungs at first

It's a bit of a double edged sword for the Warriors imo, I mean they could try & spend more time in Oz or go over earlier for their games to try & acclimatize, but then they are sacrificing their normal daily routines which most athletes are loathe to do

The only way I could possibly see around it is for the Warriors to find or create some kind of heat acclimatization chamber to try & replicate similar conditions so that they could get a head start on the acclimatization process here at home

Hyperbaric / elevation chambers (think the Warriors have one of these don't they? more so used for recovery though) have been around for quite a while to help athletes replicate high altitude conditions, so I would imagine there must be something similar out there used for heat acclimation purposes

I can't say I've actually heard of any though, maybe old sugar daddy Watson could fork out for a purpose built giant sauna for the players to train in lol
 
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Jay M

Warriors 1st Grader
Everyone else has commented on heat, humidity etc.

The one thing that I haven't seen in this thread yet... brain fatigue and decision making when fatigued... heat and humidity make you tired, yes. they fatigue you faster. but then it compounds because people can have brain fades or explosions and make bad reads/decisions when tired.

Another point to discuss!
 
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Lord Gnome of Howick MBE

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 30, 2012
7,788
Humans are very sensitive to humidity, as the skin relies on the air to get rid of moisture. The process of sweating is your body's attempt to keep cool and maintain its current temperature. If the air is at 100-percent relative humidity, sweat will not evaporate into the air. As a result, we feel much hotter than the actual temperature when the relative humidity is high. If the relative humidity is low, we can feel much cooler than the actual temperature because our sweat evaporates easily, cooling us off. For example, if the air temperature is 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 degrees Celsius) and the relative humidity is zero percent, the air temperature feels like 69 degrees Fahrenheit (21 C) to our bodies. If the air temperature is 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 C) and the relative humidity is 100 percent, we feel like it's 80 degrees (27 C) out.
That's why this summer was so unbearable in Auckland.

On the chillies thing, there are thousands of varieties with differing tastes and they will grown in warmer areas of NZ by just planting the seeds of ones you chop up for your curry. Alternatively, they make great houseplants if they get enough sun.
 
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jonno

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 13, 2014
9,804
Everyone else has commented on heat, humidity etc.

The one thing that I haven't seen in this thread yet... brain fatigue and decision making when fatigued... heat and humidity make you tired, yes. they fatigue you faster. but then it compounds because people can have brain fades or explosions and make bad reads/decisions when tired.

Another point to discuss!
Exactly what we see the Warriors doing when it's hot out.

Let's not forget that a concrete football stadium amplifies the heat on a sunny day, raising the temperature by about 4 degrees on the playing surface, above the official recorded temperature...
 

jonno

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 13, 2014
9,804
That's why this summer was so unbearable in Auckland.
So 27 degrees in Auckland at 80% feels like 29 degrees in Sydney at 50% humidity... But at a footy stadium (with the 4 degrees extra) it only has to be 25 degrees at 50% humidity before it's up at our absolute max on the playing surface... Which as you say is unbearable for anyone living in NZ.

But the last game they played it was 35 degrees or something like that, plus the extra heat from wearing black in the sun, being in a footy stadium etc...

Which is all compounded by the fact that the Tigers do have better heat conditioning and aren't struggling as much with the temperature..
 

jonno

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 13, 2014
9,804
Despite my initial tongue in cheek post I think there definitely could be something to this

I can remember when I first went to Brisbane, walked out of the air conditioned plane, through the air conditioned airport terminal through the sliding doors & BOOM!!! ... I felt like I had literally walked into a microwave oven & this was in late winter-early spring

Dave is definitely right too ... the hot air can feel like it's literally burning your lungs at first

It's a bit of a double edged sword for the Warriors imo, I mean they could try & spend more time in Oz or go over earlier for their games to try & acclimatize, but then they are sacrificing their normal daily routines which most athletes are loathe to do

The only way I could possibly see around it is for the Warriors to find or create some kind of heat acclimatization chamber to try & replicate similar conditions so that they could get a head start on the acclimatization process here at home

Hyperbaric / elevation chambers (think the Warriors have one of these don't they? more so used for recovery though) have been around for quite a while to help athletes replicate high altitude conditions, so I would imagine there must be something similar out there used for heat acclimation purposes

I can't say I've actually heard of any though, maybe old sugar daddy Watson could fork out for a purpose built giant sauna for the players to train in lol
They can crank up the heat in the Hyperbaric chamber. Not sure if they can get the whole team in there tho...

If they wanted they could get a couple of 40 foot containers, chuck them in the car park and paint them black. Those will crank up real hot.

Or they could wear heated vests at training. Surfers wear them for cold sea surfing... They don't look silly at all either...

If they get it right we'd keep our advantage in the cold, and we'd be able to foot it in the hot as well... Nice...
 

Lord Gnome of Howick MBE

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 30, 2012
7,788
So 27 degrees in Auckland at 80% feels like 29 degrees in Sydney at 50% humidity... But at a footy stadium (with the 4 degrees extra) it only has to be 25 degrees at 50% humidity before it's up at our absolute max on the playing surface... Which as you say is unbearable for anyone living in NZ.

But the last game they played it was 35 degrees or something like that, plus the extra heat from wearing black in the sun, being in a footy stadium etc...

Which is all compounded by the fact that the Tigers do have better heat conditioning and aren't struggling as much with the temperature..
So, why did the Warriors finish strongly whilst the Tigers wilted in the second half?

I saw no evidence of the Warriors struggling with anything other than their game plan, which they threw away at half time.

And do you want my vindaloo sauce recipe?
 
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jonno

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 13, 2014
9,804
So, why did the Warriors finish strongly whilst the Tigers wilted in the second half?

I saw no evidence of the Warriors struggling with anything other than their game plan, which they threw away at half time.

And do you want my vindaloo sauce recipe?
Partly because we have a much stronger squad. Partly because they took their foot off the gas defensively and the sun also hid behind the main stand in the second half...

Heat ceartinly isn't the only factor.

But if we want the top we have to go all out on everything...

And year. Post your recipe up. That'd be lovely thanks...
 

Deranged

1st Grade Fringe
May 24, 2012
501
It's not a theory about them not handling it.

I'm not saying they can't handle the heat.

But I am saying the don't...

And I think we all adjust to the environment we live in. So Islanders living in the Islands have no problems with Australia, but Islanders living in Southland do...

Just like White people who live in the Islands are fine with the temperature, and they actually quite enjoy it..
I was in Rarotonga last year and saw a red headed white boy local. He was about 60 and had drank himself into insanity, so not sure if he handled it that well. Actually the guy who picked us up from the airport was also white and married to a local again around 60 and he was crazy as fuck. I'm not sure if crazy white people go to the Islands or the heat causes it but there is something going on there.
 

Lord Gnome of Howick MBE

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 30, 2012
7,788
And year. Post your recipe up. That'd be lovely thanks...
Put the following in a blender;
10 large red chillies
6 cloves garlic
2 onions
6 tomatoes
1 tbls peppercorns

Cook your meat or prawns - plus the obligatory pre cooked and chopped potato - in the mix and add the following whilst cooking;
Splash of red wine
Lemon juice
1 tsp mustard powder
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp curry powder
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp cayenne pepper
You can also add tabasco, chili paste and chillie powder whilst cooking if your fresh chillies were mild.

Caution: place toilet paper in fridge after eating.
 

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