General From the Herald - Rugby Crowds Down, Warriors Crowds Up!

Northern_Union

Guest
Of course it is, especially when you consider that at the time they started banning, (circa. 1907-08), the All Blacks were already getting paid more than the All Golds.

I'm just not sure why you're asking me...lol.

Because your an administrator and ment to know everything :D
 

Kav_old

Guest
Technically, league is a rebel form of the game, as it broke away from rugby union, but then union itself was a rebel form by breaking away from football, so it's a bit of a hypocritical position to take, methinks.

Nothing wrong with being a rebel, JJ, if the cause is right!

Kav
 

LordGnome_old

Guest
One of the main reasons that I don't like union comes from when I was a schoolboy back in England;

One day, the games teacher turned up with this odd shaped ball that you could pick up and run with and he taught us the rudiments of this game that we, as 12 year olds in inner-London, had never heard of.

Being quite a big lad I quite liked playing "rugby", so i asked the games teacher if we were going to have a team to play the other schools, like we did at football, but I was told that it wasn't for the likes of us and that inter-schools rugby was only for the pupils of private fee-paying schools.

And people wonder why it isn't popular in England and Scotland!
 

Northern_Union

Guest
One of the main reasons that I don't like union comes from when I was a schoolboy back in England;

One day, the games teacher turned up with this odd shaped ball that you could pick up and run with and he taught us the rudiments of this game that we, as 12 year olds in inner-London, had never heard of.

Being quite a big lad I quite liked playing "rugby", so i asked the games teacher if we were going to have a team to play the other schools, like we did at football, but I was told that it wasn't for the likes of us and that inter-schools rugby was only for the pupils of private fee-paying schools.

And people wonder why it isn't popular in England and Scotland!

It's private fee paying schools in Australia that keep the game alive there as well. It really is an ugly cancer of a sport that dumb New Zealanders have been told to follow at school and as good little sheep have duely done so.
 

LordGnome_old

Guest
If only the average kiwi knew how hated their national sport was in most other countrie!

Hopefully, it goes belly-up for them soon;

Nervous time ahead for NZRU
By TOBY ROBSON - The Dominion Post | Friday, 27 April 2007

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CRAIG SIMCOX/Dominion Post
MODEL PLAYERS: Carl Hayman, Ma'a Nonu and Nick Evans show off the new jerseys the All Blacks will wear at the World Cup later this year.

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AdvertisementUnder increasing pressure from a soaring exchange rate and an apparent dip in the popularity of its staple competitions the New Zealand Rugby Union faces a nervous year.


Fresh from announcing a $4.8 million loss for 2006 the NZRU yesterday predicted a $4.4 million loss in 2007 with chief executive Chris Moller warning "core activities" could be affected unless the New Zealand dollar dipped before the year's end.

"That's based on exchange rates in the low 60s and low 30s in respect of the pound," Moller said after the NZRU's annual general meeting in Wellington.

"At a bit above 70 cents and 36 pence in the pound it would be in excess of $10 million."

The New Zealand dollar was trading at 74c and 37p yesterday and Moller admitted it was a "worrying trend".

The NZRU gains 67 per cent of its income from overseas and also holds US$20 million and 17 million, the latter a deposit on the hosting fee for the 2011 Rugby World Cup.

"It's certainly going to pose some challenges and we would have to take some action in respect of the business," he said. "Like any other exporter in this country we would face severe financial challenges and would have to take action."

While the NZRU was committed to maintaining all initiatives in regard to provincial unions, clubs and schools this year, that would change if the exchange rate did not, Moller said.

The bleak financial outlook comes at a time when the NZRU acknowledges it has noted falling viewer numbers for the Super 14 and Air New Zealand Cup.

Moller told the AGM that overall attendances for the Super 14 and Air New Zealand Cup were up, but average crowds and viewer numbers were down for both.

In the case of New Zealand's domestic flagship, overall audience was up 20 per cent, but there was an 11 per cent fall in the average crowd, while television viewership was 137,000, short of its target of 159,000.

There was also the spectre of a Bledisloe Cup test in Christchurch that failed to sell out (there were 2000 spare seats) because of a winter freeze. However, while he had noted some downward trends Moller was adamant there were mitigating circumstances in each case and did not accept interest was dwindling.

"The jury's out on that. The situation is that we are seeing a lot of changes in the wider broadcasting market.

"There are a number of other non-sport and non-rugby programmes suffering in terms of audience ratings.

"Some other codes are also having a down-turn in TV ratings. Furthermore, research shows the sport of rugby in this country, and the ABs in particular, remain at an all-time high, so there's conflicting evidence to whether there is too much rugby."

Moller said the revamped Air New Zealand Cup had been a huge success, invigorating rugby in the provinces, while playing numbers continued to rise nationally.

The test in Auckland last year, though sold out, kicked off at 5.30pm - outside the usual prime time spot of 7.30pm - resulting in less international exposure, while the last two games of the Tri-Nations played in South Africa had been dead rubbers.

In fact, Moller said the All Blacks brand had never been more powerful and was well positioned to drive revenue generation on the international market.

The NZRU reaped $4 million extra in domestic match revenue last year because of two tests at Eden Park and an extra home match in the Bledisloe Cup.

It also pulled in $2.4 million from last year's test against England at Twickenham, an increase on tests against Wales and the Barbarians in the two previous seasons.

But Moller said playing test matches was just one way to leverage the All Blacks brand, pointing to new sponsor Ivesco as an example of its international appeal.
 

LordGnome_old

Guest
When I came to New Zealand - the wife is a south Aucklander!

Like a lot of English people here, I was dissapointed with rugby union - which kiwis in London always tell you is like football in Europe, South America, Africa, Asia etc here in New Zealand - and the Warriors was the closest thing you get to a 'proper' sporting occassion.

Plus, I now have two young girls who want to be cheerleaders!
 

Kav_old

Guest
Yeah good stuff Millwall; nice to have another forum member who does not run with the fox and hunt with the hounds!

Kav
 

Northern_Union

Guest
Yeah good stuff Millwall; nice to have another forum member who does not run with the fox and hunt with the hounds!

Kav

Damn wish i'd thought of that one Kav, sums a few people up nicely....one i can think of that claimed schools forced union players to play league.
 

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