General Favourite Album

Spence_old

Guest
I forked out and brought one of my favourite albums on vinyl today, David Bowie's David Live. Earl Slick guitar playing on it is some of the best I've heard. It's such a horrible album in many ways, Bowie's pretty much dead, the backing band almost refused to play and was at dagger throats, but it's just pure emotion. So awesome.

So what say you, are there any albums that people look back on fondly?
 

Northern_Union

Guest
How much is a vinyl album these days and do you have the stylus to play it on. First album (cassette) i ever brought was Duran Durans Seven and the Ragged Tiger. But any Queen album would do me.
 

Spence_old

Guest
In the vicinity of $30-$60, but Real Groovy has sales of old second hand records for $1-$5, and I usually find some good'ns in there, if I look long enough. And yep, I've got a record player.
 

Spence_old

Guest
Why vinyl? Whats the attraction?

I'm not one of those snobs that insist that it sounds 100x better. It's not necessarily a better sound, it's just different. It seems more... personal? I'm not sure what word I'm looking for, in the least pretentious way, it's simply ineffable. I guess it's also about the ritual. Brushing the dust off, setting it up, it's just cool.
 
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Ryan_old

Guest
Why vinyl? Whats the attraction?
It's pretty much a load of bollocks. I collected vinyl with a vengeance from around 17 through to 24 years old and I ended up with around 200-300 pieces and it cost me a fortune in time and money.

Because collecting vinyl was what all my heroes did, there was no doubt in my mind that vinyl was the "best" format. And then I realised, after all that time, that vinyl was actually preventing me from listening to that music because of the requisite for a record player, which pretty much excluded all music listening places (work, in the car, going for a walk, grocery shopping, etc.) except for home.

And that's not to mention how awfully difficult it is to cart around a large record collection. 5 years later, I now have, slowly, moved on to a fully digital collection (i.e. I replaced most of my vinyl with CDs, ripped them all, then ripped all my CD collection too - then gave all of it away to friends). All my music fits onto a HDD the size of my hand, is around 300GB in size (30% lossless format), and has about 4000 artists. If you wanted carry around 4000 artists on vinyl, you'd need a Transit Van for that, at least.

All that said, there are still quite a few electronic and obscure hip hop releases that are vinyl only releases. I still, very occasionally, buy vinyl (if it isn't available in another format) but I record it to digital (using a friends turntable/mixer/computer setup) asap and ultimately give the piece away.
 
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Ryan_old

Guest
Adding to that though, there is irrefutable truth that vinyl has a greater dynamic range than your standard audio CD. Professional and trained persons maybe able to pick this in listening to double blind comparisons, but the average joe wouldn't notice the difference. Sometimes, on large sound systems, vinyl can have a significant audible difference (ie even your average joe can tell) to the standard digital format.
 

Spence_old

Guest
It's pretty much a load of bollocks. I collected vinyl with a vengeance from around 17 through to 24 years old and I ended up with around 200-300 pieces and it cost me a fortune in time and money.

Because collecting vinyl was what all my heroes did, there was no doubt in my mind that vinyl was the "best" format. And then I realised, after all that time, that vinyl was actually preventing me from listening to that music because of the requisite for a record player, which pretty much excluded all music listening places (work, in the car, going for a walk, grocery shopping, etc.) except for home.

And that's not to mention how awfully difficult it is to cart around a large record collection. 5 years later, I now have, slowly, moved on to a fully digital collection (i.e. I replaced most of my vinyl with CDs, ripped them all, then ripped all my CD collection too - then gave all of it away to friends). All my music fits onto a HDD the size of my hand, is around 300GB in size (30% lossless format), and has about 4000 artists. If you wanted carry around 4000 artists on vinyl, you'd need a Transit Van for that, at least.

All that said, there are still quite a few electronic and obscure hip hop releases that are vinyl only releases. I still, very occasionally, buy vinyl (if it isn't available in another format) but I record it to digital (using a friends turntable/mixer/computer setup) asap and ultimately give the piece away.

I hardly ever listen to my records (compared to iPod/computer/etc), for those very reasons. But when I'm chilling at home I like putting an record on. I don't collect millions of records, like you said it's just too much of a hassle moving them around. I've just got personal favourites.
 

Ryan_old

Guest
Yeah, well, it was a bit of a rant, but I still find the idea of buying vinyl anathema. To me, in the most simple terms, vinyl's revival is a wanky distraction from the real goal of actually listening to music.
 

Spence_old

Guest
I guess you're right it the sense that it's more than simply listening to music, there's a bit of a ritual that goes with it. So yes, it is a distraction from actually listening to music, but I disagree that it is necessarily wanky, I think it adds to it.

Re-reading that, it does sound rather wanky, so I might stop.
 

Ryan_old

Guest
Laughs. Well, if you like the distraction, then y'know, it's all good. I suppose that if you're keeping your (vinyl) collection to manageable size (whatever the fak that maybe) you'll be alright.
 

Ryan_old

Guest
It all pretty much falls into my philosophy of possesions based on Chuck Palahniuk's novel Fight Club. Basically, it's about being careful about what one owns. We all to often head down this path (in our modern capitalist society) of acquiring stuff (most of it useless junk). And it becomes a part of us and eventually begins to own us. And then one day, poof, it could be all gone. I've actually seen this first hand with one of my closest buddies house went completely under in the 2011 Qld floods. And insurance couldn't help him either (because a lot of insurance companies don't offer cover for the type of riverine flooding that occured). It's an interesting question to ask yourself, do I need all this stuff I have? How would I cope if it were suddenly all gone?
 

Spence_old

Guest
It's an interesting idea, and one that is hard to answer without it actually happening to me. I've only really had the odd item of clothing stolen, so it's not really comparable, but even with that I felt quite upset about it. I guess clothing is somewhat different as you use it on a daily basis, and your clothing doesn't so much own you, but it does define who you are to a certain extent. I guess I am somewhat emotionally attached to certain items of clothing, for example my leather jacket, I'd be pretty gutted if I lost that. Typing it makes it seem very trivial, and I guess it it. Perhaps my clothes do infact own me.
 

sebastian_old

Guest
It all pretty much falls into my philosophy of possesions based on Chuck Palahniuk's novel Fight Club. Basically, it's about being careful about what one owns. We all to often head down this path (in our modern capitalist society) of acquiring stuff (most of it useless junk). And it becomes a part of us and eventually begins to own us. And then one day, poof, it could be all gone. I've actually seen this first hand with one of my closest buddies house went completely under in the 2011 Qld floods. And insurance couldn't help him either (because a lot of insurance companies don't offer cover for the type of riverine flooding that occured). It's an interesting question to ask yourself, do I need all this stuff I have? How would I cope if it were suddenly all gone?

Thats why people like to reproduce. To theoretically pass on "their" own objects to "their" own seeds. We really own nothing. We're just renting, or leasing if you will, until the day we pass away. Some of us, unfortunately, have deluded concepts of objects and their status of value. Ingrained since birth from the society they were born into.

Hell, i was one of those people for years. Took me years to contemplate the true temporary sense of objects. Letting go of any subconcious lust of objects was one of the healthiest things i've ever done. Really no one person is to blame for our current societies greater lust for material objects. Its multiple suits against multiple persons/corporations that we've become so materialistic as a culture.

The extreme toll, the birth of the OCD desease is just an extreme example of what we as a society have become. To be temporarily comforted by obtaining, is fine. If we actually had a need or a want for the object but i think western culture especially has built its foundations on the very notion of obtaining. And thats extremely unhealthy, IMO.
 
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AC5_old

Guest
It all pretty much falls into my philosophy of possesions based on Chuck Palahniuk's novel Fight Club. Basically, it's about being careful about what one owns. We all to often head down this path (in our modern capitalist society) of acquiring stuff (most of it useless junk). And it becomes a part of us and eventually begins to own us. And then one day, poof, it could be all gone. I've actually seen this first hand with one of my closest buddies house went completely under in the 2011 Qld floods. And insurance couldn't help him either (because a lot of insurance companies don't offer cover for the type of riverine flooding that occured). It's an interesting question to ask yourself, do I need all this stuff I have? How would I cope if it were suddenly all gone?

This. When we moved to Oz (and soon the uk) me and my gf got all our stuff down to 3 bags of clothes to take. Sure we have stuff in storage in NZ for our eventual return, but would I care if it disappeared? Not too much. We threw out so much errenuous crap when we left it was quite liberating, to borrow a cliche.
 

numbnutsnz_old

Guest
I have a record player just for the novelty pretty much.

Favourite album to play on vinyl is easily Cold Chisel Swingshift. Superb live double vinyl of Jimmy at his vocal best and Mossy tearing up the guitar as he still did with ease when I saw them last month.
 

MarkW_old

Guest
Hard to pick out just one favourite album... but maybe OK Computer by Radiohead if I had to choose. I thrashed that album in the 90s!

I've got a small vinyl collection too which I bust out every now and then. No, it's not practical but there's a certain nostalgia attached to the ritual of playing a record like Spence said.
I recently picked up a copy of Nirvana's Nevermind on blue 180 gram - ahhh the memories.
 
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