General English lessons

wrighty

I dream of the blackcaps winning the world cup
Contributor
Mar 17, 2018
3,278
For mine murchie doesnt look any better than a local fox player like King Vuniyayawa or Preston Riki.

What does "For mine" mean? I noticed cricket commentators start to use the term 5 years ago. Have never heard anyone in real life use it. I asked my mother who has a degree in English and spent 20 years teaching English at high school and she has no idea of where the phrase comes from and hadn't heard of it.
It is a new millenium expression? Serious question. Would very much like to know.
Your use of it is the first time have seen someone use it on a message board.

Welcome to the forum by the way if you are a new.

I don't mean to be a jerk - just find that expression jarring.
 
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wrighty

I dream of the blackcaps winning the world cup
Contributor
Mar 17, 2018
3,278
What does "For mine" mean? I noticed cricket commentators start to use the term 5 years ago. Have never heard anyone in real life use it. I asked my mother who has a degree in English and spent 20 years teaching English at high school and she has no idea of where the phrase comes from and hadn't heard of it.
It is a new millenium expression? Serious question. Would very much like to know.
Your use of it is the first time have seen someone use it on a message board.

Welcome to the forum by the way if you are a new.

Found this while googling..."for mine" - this is the only reference I could find with regards to "for mine" on the Internet.

"Posted by Smokey Stover on October 19, 2006

In Reply to: For mine Posted by Michael Sinclair on October 19, 2006

: I have a question about "for mine".

: You see this on a lot of chat forums. ie - "Dogs are better than cats for mine."

: OR

: "For mine, dogs are better than cats." (Which happens to be true!)

: It seems to replace 'in my opinion' but it doesn't seem to make any literary sense. I would love to hear if this is correct english or if it's an utter bastardisation of the language and where it originated from. (One guess!!!)

It would be correct if there was a previous sentence saying, perhaps, "For my part, dogs are better than cats." But lacking that it seems as though great liberties were being taken with the language.
SS"
 

john nick

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 28, 2020
1,224
tauranga
What does "For mine" mean? I noticed cricket commentators start to use the term 5 years ago. Have never heard anyone in real life use it. I asked my mother who has a degree in English and spent 20 years teaching English at high school and she has no idea of where the phrase comes from and hadn't heard of it.
It is a new millenium expression? Serious question. Would very much like to know.
Your use of it is the first time have seen someone use it on a message board.

Welcome to the forum by the way if you are a new.

I don't mean to be a jerk - just find that expression jarring.
Hi Wrighty.I think it means IMO
 

scree

Warriors Bench Player
Aug 11, 2013
31
What does "For mine" mean?
I hate this too. Rugby League people are the worst at it, commentators especially, I can just picture Michael Ennis saying, "for mooooiine". I replied to a post by mrblonde that mentioned it at start of the year:
Worried2Death's reply was great, hah.
It's Aussie boomer pisshead talk, my old man came back from Sydney saying "for moiyne" like a wanker.
 

Noitall

1st Grade Fringe
Aug 21, 2019
1,380
What does "For mine" mean? I noticed cricket commentators start to use the term 5 years ago. Have never heard anyone in real life use it. I asked my mother who has a degree in English and spent 20 years teaching English at high school and she has no idea of where the phrase comes from and hadn't heard of it.
It is a new millenium expression? Serious question. Would very much like to know.
Your use of it is the first time have seen someone use it on a message board.

Welcome to the forum by the way if you are a new.

I don't mean to be a jerk - just find that expression jarring.
Person I hear it most from is Corey Parker.
 
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jonesy101

1st Grade Fringe
Aug 28, 2016
831
I've heard "for mine" used plenty of times outside of league circles so its a fairly common term in the English vocabulary.

What I cant understand with league players is why "those" often gets replaced with "them". Such as "We were in the hunt until they scored all them points."
 
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wrighty

I dream of the blackcaps winning the world cup
Contributor
Mar 17, 2018
3,278
I've heard "for mine" used plenty of times outside of league circles so its a fairly common term in the English vocabulary.
This is untrue and false.

If you google "for mine" although 17 million responses are found...as far as I could tell when clicking on them were talking about gold mines or copper mines.
I could only find two instances in the Internet where the expression "for mine" was used to mean IMO.

Lastly this link shows the definition of the word "mine" https://www.dictionary.com/browse/mine?s=t

There is an extensive commentary on that page of how the word mine is used and none of those examples include "for mine".

What country are you on Jonesy are you in Australia?
For mine is not a New Zealand saying.
 
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Sup42

Warriors 1st Grader
May 7, 2012
17,794
Found this while googling..."for mine" - this is the only reference I could find with regards to "for mine" on the Internet.

"Posted by Smokey Stover on October 19, 2006

In Reply to: For mine Posted by Michael Sinclair on October 19, 2006

: I have a question about "for mine".

: You see this on a lot of chat forums. ie - "Dogs are better than cats for mine."

: OR

: "For mine, dogs are better than cats." (Which happens to be true!)

: It seems to replace 'in my opinion' but it doesn't seem to make any literary sense. I would love to hear if this is correct english or if it's an utter bastardisation of the language and where it originated from. (One guess!!!)

It would be correct if there was a previous sentence saying, perhaps, "For my part, dogs are better than cats." But lacking that it seems as though great liberties were being taken with the language.
SS"
It is purely Australian colloquial speech which New Zealanders have acquired from Aussie commentators.

It has become as legitimate as true blue dyed in the wool Kiwiana equivalents yeah nah...

For mine is for my opinion...lazy Aussie speech which league fans have adopted here from Aussie league commentary.

Another dumb habit kiwis have from Aussie league is saying this kid....

Really dumb and totally hokey...its not even how they talk in real life...but it stuck and so fans say this kid to sound legitimate in their lunch times.
 
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Noitall

1st Grade Fringe
Aug 21, 2019
1,380
It is purely Australian colloquial speech which New Zealanders have acquired from Aussie commentators.

It has become as legitimate as true blue dyed in the wool Kiwiana equivalents yeah nah...

For mine is for my opinion...lazy Aussie speech which league fans have adopted here from Aussie league commentary.

Another dumb habit kiwis have from Aussie league is saying this kid....

Really dumb and totally hokey...its not even how they talk in real life...but it stuck and so fans say this kid to sound legitimate in their lunch times.
Cooper Cronk is always "kid" this and that on those footy shows. Always makes me think you're fuck all older than him.
 

WA supporter

1st Grade Fringe
Contributor
Mar 18, 2017
398
Perth
Cooper Cronk is always "kid" this and that on those footy shows. Always makes me think you're fuck all older than him.
I’m only surmising here,but I’m guessing ‘kid’ is just a term of endearment,as is the same place ’boy’ is bandied about withIn Maori circles. I’m 58yo but am still called boy, by my elders! One word I have noticed with reading posts from friends in NZ is,aye. Is this a throwback to the Scots,as in answering in the affirmative or is it meant to replace ‘eh‘?! Serious question. Because it’s often written as “we had a great time,aye!
 

Kestrel84

Rippin' and a Tearin'
Contributor
Aug 26, 2017
705
Auckland
I’m only surmising here,but I’m guessing ‘kid’ is just a term of endearment,as is the same place ’boy’ is bandied about withIn Maori circles. I’m 58yo but am still called boy, by my elders! One word I have noticed with reading posts from friends in NZ is,aye. Is this a throwback to the Scots,as in answering in the affirmative or is it meant to replace ‘eh‘?! Serious question. Because it’s often written as “we had a great time,aye!

The way Aye is used recently is just a misspelling of Eh which has stuck and never been corrected, partly because nobody knows if they actually mean Aye or Eh.
 

jonesy101

1st Grade Fringe
Aug 28, 2016
831
This is untrue and false.

If you google "for mine" although 17 million responses are found...as far as I could tell when clicking on them were talking about gold mines or copper mines.
I could only find two instances in the Internet where the expression "for mine" was used to mean IMO.
So you could only find 2 out of the 17 million results where you felt it was used in this context. You must be right then.
 

Hardyman's Yugo

1st Grade Fringe
Jun 2, 2017
2,697
Lancashire, England
I’m only surmising here,but I’m guessing ‘kid’ is just a term of endearment,as is the same place ’boy’ is bandied about withIn Maori circles. I’m 58yo but am still called boy, by my elders! One word I have noticed with reading posts from friends in NZ is,aye. Is this a throwback to the Scots,as in answering in the affirmative or is it meant to replace ‘eh‘?! Serious question. Because it’s often written as “we had a great time,aye!
Scotland plus northern England (Cumbria, Durham, Northumberland) use the word aye as a replacement for yes

In Cumbria people emphasise something that is true by saying eh at the end of a sentence instead of using words like actually or clearly.
 
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