Staff Craig Twentyman

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Feb 22, 2016
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Craig Twentyman

More on what Twentyman is doing with the club during preseason.

The unseen signing who’s reading from Ricky’s playbook to turn the Warriors around
SIMON BRUNSDON@simonbrunsdon
Source: FOX SPORTS
Ricky Stuart's 2019 pre-season is inspiring the Warriors' 2020 turnaround.
Ricky Stuart's 2019 pre-season is inspiring the Warriors' 2020 turnaround.Source: FOX SPORTS

Take a quick look at the Warriors’ squad changes from season 2019 to 2020 and there’s not a whole lot of movement.

The only recognised “in” is Wayde Egan, the young hooker who left Penrith to move across the ditch and is gunning for the No.9 jumper.

But Stephen Kearney has made another, less heralded signing, and this one could be the key to turning the club’s finals fortune around.

Alex Corvo has been replaced as head of performance by Craig Twentyman.

Twentyman previously spent years working with the Wallabies and the Australian rugby sevens teams, and is considered one of the shrewdest operators in the business.

He’s taken control of the Warriors’ pre-season program and the players are eating up everything their new trainer delivers.

“We had a big change in the head of performance role so we have a whole new program. Hopefully this program will work a lot better for us,” captain Roger Tuivasa-Sheck told foxsports.com.au.

“We’ve got him over and he’s changed a lot, (brought) a lot of his ideas of what he thinks is going to work well for us.

“A lot of high-speed intensity, a lot of reps. Trying to get the ball in hand a lot earlier than usual.”

Tuivasa-Sheck and his younger teammate Chanel Harris-Tavita revealed the players had previously barely touched a football in pre-season training leading up to the Christmas break.

When they returned in November to Twentyman’s new program, they found themselves running through skills and drills immediately.

Rather than a focus on long-running and cardio fitness, the team has been honing in on executing skills under extreme fatigue.

Kearney identified the Warriors’ biggest issue last year was closing out games in the final 10 minutes.

“Fitness for most teams is not always the problem. Game fitness is different to a test fitness,” Tuivasa-Sheck explained.

“For us it was about the skill and executing the big plays, and that’s what we needed last year. We were in the fight in most games but we lost at the back end, or lost in moments.

“Going into this season it’s about being able to execute under pressure.

“It’s fatigue, pressure, all of that plays a part when you’re trying to execute. If we can practice in those scenarios then come game day it will be a habit for us.”

Kearney’s realisation and plan to fix that issue is similar to that of Canberra coach Ricky Stuart last year.

Having lost several games after the 70th minute in season 2018, Stuart designed the 2019 pre-season to focus on decision making and execution under extreme fatigue, as revealed by foxsports.com.au last year.

The result? A grand final, and achingly close to winning the premiership.

Twentyman’s program is chalk and cheese to that of Corvo’s, but the players are responding well to the change.

“As soon as we got back we were working on our skills straight away, under fatigue, which was good,” young playmaker Harris-Tavita said.

“I think it’s felt a lot different. Last year we were running 12ks in a day, about 30 kilometres a week, whereas now we do 12ks a week instead of in one day.

“It’s helped me focus more on my skill as well which is good.”

The Warriors broke a seven-year finals drought in 2018 but slipped back down the ladder to finish 13th last season.

Tuivasa-Sheck says the players realise that’s not an acceptable result this year, and are determined to returning to the competition’s top eight.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Off The Bench

Warriors 1st Grader
Jan 26, 2014
3,167
Great article .
It's good to see us concentrate on
Our players skills .An mental fitness
I have been hoping for this for years .
Mental training won't make them smarter
But it will increase concentration time .
An mentally alert person is the person that See's an
Opportunity . an reacts first because they are concentrating .
Following game plans supporting players
Absolutely huge gains to be made .If it's
Done right .
 

warriorsfan92

1st Grade Fringe
Oct 11, 2013
704
Dunedin, New Zealand
More on what Twentyman is doing with the club during preseason.

The unseen signing who’s reading from Ricky’s playbook to turn the Warriors around

  • SIMON BRUNSDON@simonbrunsdon
  • Source: FOX SPORTS


Ricky Stuart's 2019 pre-season is inspiring the Warriors' 2020 turnaround.'s 2019 pre-season is inspiring the Warriors' 2020 turnaround.
Ricky Stuart's 2019 pre-season is inspiring the Warriors' 2020 turnaround.Source: FOX SPORTS

Take a quick look at the Warriors’ squad changes from season 2019 to 2020 and there’s not a whole lot of movement.

The only recognised “in” is Wayde Egan, the young hooker who left Penrith to move across the ditch and is gunning for the No.9 jumper.
But Stephen Kearney has made another, less heralded signing, and this one could be the key to turning the club’s finals fortune around.
Alex Corvo has been replaced as head of performance by Craig Twentyman.

Twentyman previously spent years working with the Wallabies and the Australian rugby sevens teams, and is considered one of the shrewdest operators in the business.
He’s taken control of the Warriors’ pre-season program and the players are eating up everything their new trainer delivers.

“We had a big change in the head of performance role so we have a whole new program. Hopefully this program will work a lot better for us,” captain Roger Tuivasa-Sheck told foxsports.com.au.

“We’ve got him over and he’s changed a lot, (brought) a lot of his ideas of what he thinks is going to work well for us.
“A lot of high-speed intensity, a lot of reps. Trying to get the ball in hand a lot earlier than usual.”

Tuivasa-Sheck and his younger teammate Chanel Harris-Tavita revealed the players had previously barely touched a football in pre-season training leading up to the Christmas break.

When they returned in November to Twentyman’s new program, they found themselves running through skills and drills immediately.
Rather than a focus on long-running and cardio fitness, the team has been honing in on executing skills under extreme fatigue.

Kearney identified the Warriors’ biggest issue last year was closing out games in the final 10 minutes.
“Fitness for most teams is not always the problem. Game fitness is different to a test fitness,” Tuivasa-Sheck explained.

“For us it was about the skill and executing the big plays, and that’s what we needed last year. We were in the fight in most games but we lost at the back end, or lost in moments.

“Going into this season it’s about being able to execute under pressure.

“It’s fatigue, pressure, all of that plays a part when you’re trying to execute. If we can practice in those scenarios then come game day it will be a habit for us.”

Kearney’s realisation and plan to fix that issue is similar to that of Canberra coach Ricky Stuart last year.

Having lost several games after the 70th minute in season 2018, Stuart designed the 2019 pre-season to focus on decision making and execution under extreme fatigue, as revealed by foxsports.com.au last year.

The result? A grand final, and achingly close to winning the premiership.

Twentyman’s program is chalk and cheese to that of Corvo’s, but the players are responding well to the change.
“As soon as we got back we were working on our skills straight away, under fatigue, which was good,” young playmaker Harris-Tavita said.
“I think it’s felt a lot different. Last year we were running 12ks in a day, about 30 kilometres a week, whereas now we do 12ks a week instead of in one day.

“It’s helped me focus more on my skill as well which is good.”
The Warriors broke a seven-year finals drought in 2018 but slipped back down the ladder to finish 13th last season.

Tuivasa-Sheck says the players realise that’s not an acceptable result this year, and are determined to returning to the competition’s top eight.


This is what I wrote last year. They’re telling the truth regarding corvo.


He fell out with some staff, and hasn’t changed his pre season training routine, like, at all. Ever. The games changed since his time at broncos, yet he hasn’t changed.

Yeah it’s true senior players were concerned about corvo. But I think that’s fair. Training monotony and boredom is very real. It takes a good coach to work hard whilst having fun. And he wasn’t prepared to change, anything. Sorry but my opinion, good riddance. He’s a pretty weird bastard.

Hard work doesn’t always mean effective work. Does running 50 x 100m sprints make you faster? Not at all. It makes you fucked, but it’s doesn’t make you better. There’s a place for hard work, but it needs to be sprinkled with effective work. And corvo wasn’t prepared to change anything. He’s not as good as people make out.
 

warriorsfan92

1st Grade Fringe
Oct 11, 2013
704
Dunedin, New Zealand
More on what Twentyman is doing with the club during preseason.

The unseen signing who’s reading from Ricky’s playbook to turn the Warriors around

  • SIMON BRUNSDON@simonbrunsdon
  • Source: FOX SPORTS


Ricky Stuart's 2019 pre-season is inspiring the Warriors' 2020 turnaround.'s 2019 pre-season is inspiring the Warriors' 2020 turnaround.
Ricky Stuart's 2019 pre-season is inspiring the Warriors' 2020 turnaround.Source: FOX SPORTS

Take a quick look at the Warriors’ squad changes from season 2019 to 2020 and there’s not a whole lot of movement.

The only recognised “in” is Wayde Egan, the young hooker who left Penrith to move across the ditch and is gunning for the No.9 jumper.
But Stephen Kearney has made another, less heralded signing, and this one could be the key to turning the club’s finals fortune around.
Alex Corvo has been replaced as head of performance by Craig Twentyman.

Twentyman previously spent years working with the Wallabies and the Australian rugby sevens teams, and is considered one of the shrewdest operators in the business.
He’s taken control of the Warriors’ pre-season program and the players are eating up everything their new trainer delivers.

“We had a big change in the head of performance role so we have a whole new program. Hopefully this program will work a lot better for us,” captain Roger Tuivasa-Sheck told foxsports.com.au.

“We’ve got him over and he’s changed a lot, (brought) a lot of his ideas of what he thinks is going to work well for us.
“A lot of high-speed intensity, a lot of reps. Trying to get the ball in hand a lot earlier than usual.”

Tuivasa-Sheck and his younger teammate Chanel Harris-Tavita revealed the players had previously barely touched a football in pre-season training leading up to the Christmas break.

When they returned in November to Twentyman’s new program, they found themselves running through skills and drills immediately.
Rather than a focus on long-running and cardio fitness, the team has been honing in on executing skills under extreme fatigue.

Kearney identified the Warriors’ biggest issue last year was closing out games in the final 10 minutes.
“Fitness for most teams is not always the problem. Game fitness is different to a test fitness,” Tuivasa-Sheck explained.

“For us it was about the skill and executing the big plays, and that’s what we needed last year. We were in the fight in most games but we lost at the back end, or lost in moments.

“Going into this season it’s about being able to execute under pressure.

“It’s fatigue, pressure, all of that plays a part when you’re trying to execute. If we can practice in those scenarios then come game day it will be a habit for us.”

Kearney’s realisation and plan to fix that issue is similar to that of Canberra coach Ricky Stuart last year.

Having lost several games after the 70th minute in season 2018, Stuart designed the 2019 pre-season to focus on decision making and execution under extreme fatigue, as revealed by foxsports.com.au last year.

The result? A grand final, and achingly close to winning the premiership.

Twentyman’s program is chalk and cheese to that of Corvo’s, but the players are responding well to the change.
“As soon as we got back we were working on our skills straight away, under fatigue, which was good,” young playmaker Harris-Tavita said.
“I think it’s felt a lot different. Last year we were running 12ks in a day, about 30 kilometres a week, whereas now we do 12ks a week instead of in one day.

“It’s helped me focus more on my skill as well which is good.”
The Warriors broke a seven-year finals drought in 2018 but slipped back down the ladder to finish 13th last season.

Tuivasa-Sheck says the players realise that’s not an acceptable result this year, and are determined to returning to the competition’s top eight.


And this

Now hear me out. You’re right. What he did with broncos and storm did work. But this was a while ago. His plan hasn’t changed, like, nothing. He doesn’t put in any work to improve it, this worked previously so this is what we’re doing - despite the latest research. Apparently one week he saw an Aussie rules drill and tried it on the group and 5 or 6 suffered a soft tissue injury. He’s not as educated, nor is he as effective as people make out. He’s all about hard work, which I love but it needs to be balanced with evidence and effective prescription.

Nah, not saying that. I’m saying that training should be somewhat enjoyable if you’re going to see any real improvement. Treating the athletes like cattle and having an army like training model doesnt work anymore.

This guy twentyman gets it. It’s not just hard work. It’s smart work. Under fatigue. Under pressure. Not just running running running.Good riddance to corvo, honestly.
 

pbrown01123

1st Grade Fringe
Contributor
Mar 12, 2018
280
And this

Now hear me out. You’re right. What he did with broncos and storm did work. But this was a while ago. His plan hasn’t changed, like, nothing. He doesn’t put in any work to improve it, this worked previously so this is what we’re doing - despite the latest research. Apparently one week he saw an Aussie rules drill and tried it on the group and 5 or 6 suffered a soft tissue injury. He’s not as educated, nor is he as effective as people make out. He’s all about hard work, which I love but it needs to be balanced with evidence and effective prescription.

Nah, not saying that. I’m saying that training should be somewhat enjoyable if you’re going to see any real improvement. Treating the athletes like cattle and having an army like training model doesnt work anymore.

This guy twentyman gets it. It’s not just hard work. It’s smart work. Under fatigue. Under pressure. Not just running running running.Good riddance to corvo, honestly.
I really hope you're right
 

Gizzyfan

Warriors 1st Grader
Jan 2, 2013
4,437
I think our players working with the ball is important in that it suits the Kiwi psyche of mucking around with a ball. Except for weights drills can be done that build up the fitness base just as much as anything else, there is no resistance as there is a smile on their faces as they are doing what they love.

Brazil is and always has been one of the great football nations. One of their Managers said he had troubles getting the squad to do a couple of warm up laps, but give them a ball and they ran miles without complaint.

The only caveat I have is that their fitness doesnt regress.
 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
2,767
Tauranga
The only caveat I have is that their fitness doesnt regress.
Guarantee it does... Very few people are motivated enough to go push themselves to extremes and to be better than everyone else you need to train harder than everyone else. I see the trainer as the person that has to be the bad guy sometimes, not do what the players want...
 

warriors55

1st Grade Fringe
Sep 12, 2017
1,580
I've changed my idea about Corvo leaving. I think it could actually be a good thing for us.

It seems like he was not prepared to evolve and change his training methods and reading various comments he seemed like he was a bit of a tyrant at times.

Twentyman has a 7's background and will bring in fresh ideas and training methods. Would expect a big increase in our core fitness levels this season. I back the club on this one.
 

Gizzyfan

Warriors 1st Grader
Jan 2, 2013
4,437
Guarantee it does... Very few people are motivated enough to go push themselves to extremes and to be better than everyone else you need to train harder than everyone else. I see the trainer as the person that has to be the bad guy sometimes, not do what the players want...

If you can acheive the fitness using a ball because that suits player psyche doesnt mean he is soft, if they slack it appears he has the experience to call them out.
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
15,698
There are some great posts here about Twentyman and Corvo...and some very valid points made. However Confucious say give me a wild horse to tame, not a dead one to kick into life. i.e. you cannot turn a lazy bastard into fit one by easing off the workload.
 

Worried2Death

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 6, 2016
2,287
Most enjoyable game last year was our final Raiders match when we threw it around for fun, albeit against opposition with rested players and nothing on the line. I could live with that, even if it costs us games when it doesn't come off tbh.
 

snake77

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 12, 2013
8,812
Corvo was never going to live up the expectations that were being built up when he first signed. I remember hearing Cameron George interviewed a few times about the players will finally have a full NRL pre-season and the days of fading at the end of games are gone. Not all of the issues for season 2019 come down to fitness.

On his reputation and time at the Storm and Broncos. Was he ever the head of strength and conditioning at another club? I don't think he ever was as when he was hired he said it was a chance to layout his own program. When he was at the Broncos there was an article in Mens Health or Mens Fitness about the Broncos. Most of the field work running sutff was done by another trainer. Corvo's part was in the gym with lost of super sets with power and explosive work.

Twentyman has been hired now and at least all we got was an announcement so we know the vacancy was filled and he could get on with his work. The decision making under fatigue is a different route to take. Time will tell but it will be great to see a Warriors side that doesn't have 10-20 minutes where it falls apart failing to finish a set and leaking on defense. Some of that is due to bad decision making cause guys pushing passes instead of taking a tackle to settle back into the match.
 

warriorsfan92

1st Grade Fringe
Oct 11, 2013
704
Dunedin, New Zealand
Corvo was never going to live up the expectations that were being built up when he first signed. I remember hearing Cameron George interviewed a few times about the players will finally have a full NRL pre-season and the days of fading at the end of games are gone. Not all of the issues for season 2019 come down to fitness.

On his reputation and time at the Storm and Broncos. Was he ever the head of strength and conditioning at another club? I don't think he ever was as when he was hired he said it was a chance to layout his own program. When he was at the Broncos there was an article in Mens Health or Mens Fitness about the Broncos. Most of the field work running sutff was done by another trainer. Corvo's part was in the gym with lost of super sets with power and explosive work.

Twentyman has been hired now and at least all we got was an announcement so we know the vacancy was filled and he could get on with his work. The decision making under fatigue is a different route to take. Time will tell but it will be great to see a Warriors side that doesn't have 10-20 minutes where it falls apart failing to finish a set and leaking on defense. Some of that is due to bad decision making cause guys pushing passes instead of taking a tackle to settle back into the match.

yep spot on. Dan Baker was lead S&C at broncos for a decade
 
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PNG Kiwi

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 11, 2016
388
It’s the toughest preseason ever..... for the PR team.
The PR team are earning their coin.
No major signings, so find a positive spin. Unfortunately Mr Kearney is known for not trying young blood unless injuries force his conservative hand.
A lot of other teams give young talent a chance and the fact we have no major recruits, SK maybe forced to and possibly with the new fitness trainer a different approach is now signaled.
 

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