General Coronavirus (6 Viewers)

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
2,338
Tauranga
First rugby game called off:

“Coronavirus has hit Super Rugby with next week's match between the Sunwolves and Brumbies called off.”

"Sanzaar has now been informed that the Japanese Government has requested the cancellation of sporting events in the country for the next two weeks with specific mention of the Japanese professional sports leagues," a statement said.

This things coming and it’s going to spread everywhere. How will it affect the NRL?

I’m picking there will be games called off this season and possibly games played within empty stadiums?

Interesting year ahead 🤔
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
15,248
This is strange.

I am not a gambler but I would bet anything that somebody is in NZ with the virus already. Why do I say that? Because there have been people arriving from China ever since this started and they haven't been properly checked.

After they cancelled flights from China in January some got smart and went through places like Thailand. Who would bet they are all free of the virus?

I see now they have the incubation period as out to 27 days, and there is one guy in the UK who has had no symptoms but has infected people (unknowingly) all through Europe. So much for those people they kept up at Army Bay for 14 days.

However am I shitting myself? No. Am I staying away from Chinese people? No. This is less infectious than the measles, that was widespread in Auckland last year and tragically killed some kids in Samoa.I don't know anybody that caught the measles.

It is going to get here and take out a lot of older people, which will be sad for shareholders in aged care companies. It will place a strain on the hospitals and delay elective surgery. It might even take me out being a dinosaur although I am fit and don't smoke.

However the flu takes out such people every winter, just this winter there will be a lot more.

However I cannot afford to sit on my arse at home ordering instant noodles from Countdown to be left at the front door. Nobody can really, so one may as well go to work and see what happens, just like the Chinese government is realising now.

This virus will eventually burn out and/ or they will find a vaccine soon, they are already trying HIV vaccines now and they are curing people.

There is an excellent podcast on this:
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
15,248
'Fear, paranoia': Parents refuse Asian doctors treating children as coronavirus fears grow

The Health Minister has condemned the "completely unacceptable" behaviour of parents who have refused to let doctors of Asian appearance treat their children due to fears about coronavirus.

Royal Children's Hospital management has received several complaints from staff who have been discriminated against on the basis of their ethnic appearance. There have also been reports of parents refusing to sit near other parents.

Stuart Lewena, director of emergency services at the hospital, said one female doctor had been approached by the parents of a child she was treating who requested she be replaced by a Caucasian physician.

"[The parents had] concerns she might have her own virus … And that was clearly a comment made purely on her racial appearance," Dr Lewena said.

The hospital did not switch the doctor, who was upset after the parents' request, and she continued treating the child. The hospital will not agree to any similar demand made by parents in future.

Dr Lewena said more staff had come forward with reports of similar incidents after hospital management alerted staff to the case.



Health Minister Jenny Mikakos confirmed she was aware of three incidents of racism towards staff at the hospital and moved to condemn that behaviour on Thursday morning.

"I am very concerned that there have been reports that some parents are refusing to have their children attended to by some of the staff at the hospital," she said.

"That’s been done on the basis of fear of the coronavirus and ethnicity and it is completely unacceptable."


She stressed there were stringent protocols in place around the state in containing coronavirus and there was no risk to patients at any hospital in Victoria.

Ms Mikakos said she was aware of one other incident at a Melbourne hospital where a staff member had been subjected to racism due to coronavirus, but she declined to say where it was.

"It’s very distressing to have a patient refuse to be attended to by staff because of their ethnicity or their race," she said.

"Patients cannot expect they can just pick and choose who will look after them when they come to a public hospital. They need to have respect and compassion for healthcare workers because they do amazing work."

The hospital – which has blamed parents' mistrust on overblown "fear and paranoia" surrounding coronavirus – has developed a script for staff to use as a guide if they are confronted by parents with concerns of doctors carrying the illness.
Staff have been counselled on how to manage similar situations, which Dr Lewena said were occurring "sporadically".

Dr Lewena said the hospital had not gone as far as placing signs on the walls, so it would not inadvertently promote the discriminatory behaviour.



The Alfred hospital said it had not received any reports of health workers at the hospital being discriminated against.

The state government recently launched the "Stronger Together" campaign to combat some of the challenges arising from the COVID-19 outbreak.

Dr Lewena said there was overblown fear surrounding the virus, which has infected more than 81,000 people and killed more 2500 worldwide.

He said it was probable that a larger outbreak would occur in Australia and said the public should remain "realistic and calm" because most people who contract the virus would not become severely ill.

"We're all familiar with getting viruses each winter – you don't need to flood to an emergency department every time you get those symptoms," he said.
 

BiggerD

1st Grade Fringe
May 15, 2012
1,261
Sydney
Coronavirus in the USA now.
It sounds like a patient who never ventured overseas has picked it up.

I reckon the Virus will hit Aussie & maybe NZ in May & June when the weather gets cooler.
So prepare NOW.. Save extra cash to pay rent/ mortgage.. stock up on tins of watties & heinz cans. Get medications.
Boost your immune system with garlic , ginger & honey.

It will be here.soon. probably hit congested cities like Sydney, Melbourne Auckland & maybe Wellington the hardest

If you are sweating, coughing, having breathing issues & have a craving for cheep Mexican beer.. you may have it

Here is the updated "LIVE" stats on number of people with coronavirus , number of recoveries & deaths
 
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blue bells

1st Grade Fringe
Sep 15, 2017
709
Well me and the missis just got back from our 2 week holiday in Vietnam so if yous stop hearing from me youll know who was the first nz case hahahaha but on a side note i was shitting myself the whole time and even now im like paranoid over every sniffle and cough that i do lol
 
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BeastMode

Warriors 1st Grader
Mar 7, 2015
6,767
Did we all stop procreating when aids was first identified?

One word for those of you irrationally paranoid

Natural Selection
 
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bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
15,248
Natural Selection
Actually it is two:oops:...but I get your point...and I agree :) ...and it is natural selection that will knock it on the head probably within a year.Viruses are always pathogenic, unlike most other life forms that have some role in the ecosystem. Successful life forms target the weak and slow and leave the healthy to breed, however pathogens don't, they go for broke, so they slowly run out of susceptible hosts. SARS did, so did the swine flu. Politicians love a crisis though.
 

BiggerD

1st Grade Fringe
May 15, 2012
1,261
Sydney
This looks like a virus that will mainly kill off older boomers

If you look at the stats so far. Most deaths are people over 80
this trails down to the very young .. and NOT 1 baby or toddler has died yet.

But no reason to be complacent if you are youngish., you may still
get it & carry it to rest homes, footy games , race meetings etc

And do not hug your granddad or grandma.. :(



AGEDEATH RATE*
80+ years old14.8%
70-79 years old8.0%
60-69 years old3.6%
50-59 years old1.3%
40-49 years old0.4%
30-39 years old0.2%
20-29 years old0.2%
10-19 years old0.2%
0-9 years oldno fatalities
 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
2,338
Tauranga
“The government's response had now moved from trying to keep coronavirus out to managing it, Baker said.

The next steps would include informing people how to reduce their risk of infection and "social distancing" – limiting contact with others by working from home, avoiding public transport and cancelling public gatherings.

Live sport is in the firing line of this thing. And we were joking when we all talked about this year being a write off 😉
 

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Jun 21, 2012
22,449
Mt. Wellington, Auckland
Did we all stop procreating when aids was first identified?

One word for those of you irrationally paranoid

Natural Selection
You make a good point. I'll wear a condom and be guarded against Corona lol.

We are talking about an airbourne disease so your analogy is a little off.

Just seen a post at the supermarket and people are literally buying pallets of stuff in some sort of doosday preparation. In NZ. Whether its justified or not there will be panick and I'd look to get supplies in sooner rather than later. This is already seeing the start of an economic recession. People are being laid off because supplies are being held back in China. I know of one guy who had to lay off 120 temps because there are no containers to unload.

Be prepared...

87754361_10156616709870213_8970054560794017792_n.jpg
88113748_10156616709760213_8588293815708680192_n.jpg
 

surfin

Warriors 1st Grader
May 9, 2012
6,005
Coromandel
Yeah this SARS virus is pretty scary alright but in real terms this swine flu isn't as fatal as the measles from last year. Hopefully most of us in NZ won't have to worry about bird flu and things can continue to carry on reasonably unaffected. As yet I don't know of anyone that has come in contact with Mad Cow Disease so as long as we continue to take precautions we should all be reasonably safe. Even in the overseas cases the chances of coming out the other side after catching Y2K is extremely high. Anyway hopefully no one here gets Zika or chikungunya and we can carry on with the important things in life like bitching about the Warriors.

Honestly I'm amazed just how much panic this is causing when more people continue to die from influenza around the world without causing a global shut down. Especially since it was unknown before December and when you take into account the amount of people that would have had contact with the infected through travel before it became known, it's hardly raced through the worlds population decimating humans. But as long as the media decide this story is better click bait than Harry and Megan they will continue to push it.

My take on it, admittedly with zero research:

Pros:
- Good for the planet- Basically the biggest cause for climate change, too many people on the planet, if we can get rid of a few billion we will save a rare tree frog or two.
- Less air travel, again lets rejoice for the skinny polar bears that are currently losing their homes.
- No climate change, Greta can go home and resume her childhood.
- Less people travelling by air, more competitive/cheaper airfares and accommodation for those of us that are OK with air travel.
- The virus isn't spreading like the Spanish flu, therefore nowhere near as many actual deaths, however also a con as we may not meet our end world population target of dropping a few billion. Climate change continues. Greta has to dust off her hot air balloon for international travel/speaking tour once the borders are re-opened.
- Less campervans and rental cars on the road, trying to fucken kill me every day of the week by driving on the wrong side of the road or stopping in the middle of a blind corner to take a photo of a pukeko. True story.
- The media focusing on this story alone, meaning zero time spent on other non news stories involving, royalty, celebrities or Winston Peters.


Cons:
- The media focusing on this story alone, meaning zero time spent on other non news stories involving, royalty, celebrities or Winston Peters.
- People are actually dying, lives are being put on hold and people are suffering financially around the world.
- China wants to control the worlds markets, seems to be working out quite well for them at the moment and all it's cost them is a few peasants.
- The panic is actually feeding the fire and pushing the world towards everything that is trying to be avoided.
- Right now there is a greater risk you or someone you love will die in a car crash, but everyone is comfortable with those odds and will continue to hop into a cars everyday without a second thought, while focusing on coronavirus and what it may do to you when it arrives.
- One day a real pandemic will arrive and no one will believe it. Unless climate change, or an asteroid or someone lifts the dome off the world gets us first.
- Another season of shitty Warriors results but with a new excuse, " It wasn't the game plan, skill set or poor use of the bench, RTS had a sniffle."
 

surfin

Warriors 1st Grader
May 9, 2012
6,005
Coromandel
You make a good point. I'll wear a condom and be guarded against Corona lol.

We are talking about an airbourne disease so your analogy is a little off.

Just seen a post at the supermarket and people are literally buying pallets of stuff in some sort of doosday preparation. In NZ. Whether its justified or not there will be panick and I'd look to get supplies in sooner rather than later. This is already seeing the start of an economic recession. People are being laid off because supplies are being held back in China. I know of one guy who had to lay off 120 temps because there are no containers to unload.

Be prepared...

Why are they Asian, has Chairman Mao sent an email I haven't seen?
 

surfin

Warriors 1st Grader
May 9, 2012
6,005
Coromandel
Why was I not warned about these bananas?


Our brains don’t let piddling little facts get in the way of a good story, allowing lies to infect the mind with surprising ease.





Author image

By David Robson
25th March 2016






I
If you ever need proof of human gullibility, cast your mind back to the attack of the flesh-eating bananas. In January 2000, a series of chain emails began reporting that imported bananas were infecting people with “necrotizing fasciitis” – a rare disease in which the skin erupts into livid purple boils before disintegrating and peeling away from muscle and bone.
According to the email chain, the FDA was trying to cover up the epidemic to avoid panic. Faced with the threat, readers were encouraged to spread the word to their friends and family.
The threat was pure nonsense, of course. But by 28 January, the concern was great enough for the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to issue a statement decrying the rumour.
Did it help? Did it heck. Rather than quelling the rumour, they had only poured fuel on its flames. Within weeks, the CDC was hearing from so many distressed callers it had to set up a banana hotline. The facts became so distorted that people eventually started to quote the CDC as the source of the rumour. Even today, new variants of the myth have occasionally reignited those old fears.


The banana apocalypse may seem comical in hindsight, but the same cracks in our rational thinking can have serious, even dangerous, consequences
We may laugh at these far-fetched urban myths – as ridiculous as the ongoing theory that Paul McCartney, Miley Cyrus and Megan Fox have all been killed and replaced with lookalikes. But the same cracks in our logic allow the propagation of far more dangerous ideas, such as the belief that HIV is harmless and vitamin supplements can cure AIDS, that 9/11 was an ‘inside job’ by the US government, or that a tinfoil hat will stop the FBI from reading your thoughts.
Why do so many false beliefs persist in the face of hard evidence? And why do attempts to deny them only add grist to the rumour mill? It's not a question of intelligence – even Nobel Prize winners have fallen for some bizarre and baseless theories. But a series of recent psychological advances may offer some answers, showing how easy it is to construct a rumour that bypasses the brain’s deception filters.


According to conspiracy theorists, the actress Megan Fox has died and been replaced by lookalikes - not once, but twice (Credit: Getty Images)

One, somewhat humbling, explanation is that we are all “cognitive misers” – to save time and energy, our brains use intuition rather than analysis.
As a simple example, quickly answer the following questions:
“How many animals of each kind did Moses take on the Ark?”
“Margaret Thatcher was the president of what country?”
Between 10 and 50% of study participants presented with these questions fail to notice that it was Noah, not Moses, who built the Ark, and that Margaret Thatcher was the prime minster, not the president – even when they have been explicitly asked to note inaccuracies.
Known as the “Moses illusion”, this absentmindedness illustrates just how easily we miss the details of a statement, favouring the general gist in place of the specifics. Instead, we normally just judge whether it “feels” right or wrong before accepting or rejecting its message. “Even when we ‘know’ we should be drawing on facts and evidence, we just draw on feelings,” says Eryn Newman at the University of Southern California, whose forthcoming paper summarises the latest research on misinformation.
Based on the research to date, Newman suggests our gut reactions swivel around just five simple questions:
  • Does a fact come from a credible source?
  • Do others believe it?
  • Is there plenty of evidence to support it?
  • Is it compatible with what I believe?
  • Does it tell a good story?
Crucially, our responses to each of these points can be swayed by frivolous, extraneous, details that have nothing to do with the truth.
Consider the questions of whether others believe a statement or not, and whether the source is credible. We tend to trust people who are familiar to us, meaning that the more we see a talking head, the more we will begrudgingly start to believe what they say. “The fact that they aren’t an expert won’t even come into our judgement of the truth,” says Newman. What’s more, we fail to keep count of the number of people supporting a view; when that talking head repeats their idea on endless news programmes, it creates the illusion that the opinion is more popular and pervasive than it really is. Again, the result is that we tend to accept it as the truth.
Sticky nuggets
Then there’s the “cognitive fluency” of a statement – essentially, whether it tells a good, coherent story that is simple to imagine. “If something feels smooth and easy to process, then our default is to expect things to be true,” says Newman. This is particularly true if a myth easily fits with our expectations. “It has to be sticky – a nugget or soundbite that links to what you know, and reaffirms your beliefs,” agrees Stephan Lewandowsky at the University of Bristol in the UK, whose work has examined the psychology of climate change deniers.
A slick presentation will instantly boost the cognitive fluency of a claim, while raising its believability. In one recent study, Newman presented participants with an article (falsely) saying that a well-known rock singer was dead. The subjects were more likely to believe the claim if the article was presented next to a picture of him, simply because it became easier to bring the singer to mind – boosting the cognitive fluency of the statement. Similarly, writing in an easy-to-read font, or speaking with good enunciation, have been shown to increase cognitive fluency; indeed, Newman has shown that something as seemingly inconsequential as the sound of someone’s name can sway us; the easier it is to pronounce, the more likely we are to accept their judgement.
In light of these discoveries, you can begin to understand why the fear of the flesh-eating bananas was so infectious. For one thing, the chain emails were coming from people you inherently trust – your friends – increasing the credibility of the claim, and making it appear more popular. The concept itself was vivid and easy to picture – it had high cognitive fluency. If you happened to distrust the FDA and the government, the thought of a cover-up would have fitted neatly into your worldview.


It's true: we would rather hide our heads in the sand than listen to evidence questioning our beliefs, even if the facts are solid (Credit: Getty Images)

That cognitive miserliness can also help explain why those attempts to correct a myth have backfired so spectacularly, as the CDC found to their cost. Lab experiments confirm that offering counter-evidence only strengthens someone’s conviction. “In as little as 30 minutes, you can see a bounce-back effect where people are even more likely to believe the statement is true,” says Newman.
The problem, she says, emerges from our deeply flawed memories. Correcting the facts “would work very well if we could play back our memories as if they were recorded on video, but years of research show the memory is not perfect – we fill in gaps and we lose information,” she says.
Fraying beliefs
As a result of these frailties, we are instantly drawn to the juicier details of a story – the original myth – while forgetting the piddling little fact that it’s been proven false. Worse still, by repeating the original myth, the correction will have increased the familiarity of the claim – and as we’ve seen, familiarity breeds believability. Rather than uprooting the myth, the well-intentioned correction has only pushed it deeper.
A debunked myth may also leave an uncomfortable gap in the mind. Lewandowsky explains that our beliefs are embedded in our “mental models” of the way the world works; each idea is interlinked with our other views. It’s a little like a tightly bound book: once you tear out one page, the others may begin to fray as well. “You end up with a black hole in your mental representation, and people don’t like it.” To avoid that discomfort, we would often rather cling to the myth before our whole belief system starts unravelling.
Fortunately, there are more effective ways to set people straight and make the truth stick. For a start, you should avoid repeating the original story (where possible) and try to come up with a whole alternative to patch up the tear in their mental model. “If I tell you the Moon is not made of cheese, then you find it difficult to give up on the belief – but if I say it’s not cheese but rock, you say ‘OK, fine’, because you still have an idea of what the Moon is like,” explains Lewandowsky.


Andrew Wakefield (pictured) falsified elements of research that wrongly linked autism to MMR vaccines, leading him to be struck off the medical register (Credit: Getty Images)

Newman agrees it’s a helpful strategy. For instance, when considering the fears that MMR vaccines may be linked to autism, she suggests it would be better to build a narrative around the scientific fraud that gave rise to the fears – rather than the typical “myth-busting” article that unwittingly reinforces the misinformation. Whatever story you choose, you need to increase the cognitive fluency with clear language, pictures, and good presentation. And repeating the message, a little but often, will help to keep it fresh in their minds. Soon, it begins to feel as familiar and comfortable as the erroneous myth – and the tide of opinion should begin to turn.
At the very least, staying conscious of these flaws in your thinking will help you to identify when you may be being deceived. Both Newman and Lewandowsky point out that there is a flurry of misinformation flying around the forthcoming US presidential elections, as seen in Donald Trump’s claims that Mexican immigrants bring sexual violence and drug trafficking and Hillary Clinton’s opinion that Isis are using videos of Trump to recruit terrorists. (Neither statement held up to fact-checking.)
It’s always worth asking whether you have thought carefully about the things you are reading and hearing. Or are you just being a cognitive miser, persuaded by biased feelings rather than facts? Some of your dearest opinions may have no more substance than the great banana hoax of the year 2000.
--
 
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wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
2,338
Tauranga
Why was I not warned about these bananas?
So just trying to tie this back to the thread...

So you are saying Coronavirus is spread by eating bananas as well now? What a significant development. I thought it was only spread while drinking beer!

#coronabananavirus
 
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bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
15,248
You make a good point. I'll wear a condom and be guarded against Corona lol.

We are talking about an airbourne disease so your analogy is a little off.

Just seen a post at the supermarket and people are literally buying pallets of stuff in some sort of doosday preparation. In NZ. Whether its justified or not there will be panick and I'd look to get supplies in sooner rather than later. This is already seeing the start of an economic recession. People are being laid off because supplies are being held back in China. I know of one guy who had to lay off 120 temps because there are no containers to unload.

Be prepared...

Is that reprobate buying a pallet of rice? Heyzeuss spare me there are some Darwins around.
 

surfin

Warriors 1st Grader
May 9, 2012
6,005
Coromandel
So just trying to tie this back to the thread...

So you are saying Coronavirus is spread by eating bananas as well now? What a significant development. I thought it was only spread while drinking beer!

#coronabananavirus
Correct, coronavirus is spread by beer, bananas and gullibility. It also opens up way more meme possibilities better than ebola, just.

1582942160886.png
 
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bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
15,248

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