General 2020 Season Suspended

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
7,682
If the NRL go totally broke, which seems unlikely, then all bets will be off for all the clubs and players.

However Roy Masters seems to think the value of the NRL.COM website will save the day. It is potentially worth billions, but only at the right time to the right bidder, Right now it is probably only worth enough to stave off insolvency

It seems News Corp is sniffing around so will probably want more control, whatever that means.
Mr Watson, come on down.
 

Rizzah

Stop Being Shit
Contributor
Apr 18, 2012
2,480
Dunedin, NZ

A few clubs standing people down without pay, Warriors dont get a mention, maybe they have already decided to cut us off
On Wednesday, Parramatta coach Brad Arthur joined John Morris, Dean Pay, Adam O'Brien, Paul Green and Ivan Cleary in being stood down immediately.
Might be able to pick up a new coach fairly easily.......... 😒
 

snake77

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 12, 2013
8,004
I read the players rejected a 50% paycut, same article also said they are working with the NRL to get through this. Now with so many people from head office, club management, coaches being told to take annual leave or go stood down it wouldn't be a good look if the players played hardball on taking a cut or by how much.

In general life its stay home save lives. Its also stay home to get this sorted, keep working so you hopefully have a job to go back to. For the NRL and the clubs the more costs come down the longer they can last on their cash reserves, more money to help bail out clubs.
 
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1995Warriorsfan

Player Agent
Contributor
Feb 22, 2016
1,316
Well done team !!

Coronavirus: Players give money back to Warriors to help club survive and staff keep jobs

David Long, Stuff
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can." data-xf-init="lightbox" data-lb-single-image="1" data-lb-container-zoom="1" data-lb-trigger=".js-lbImage-_xfUid-1-1585719690" data-lb-id="_xfUid-1-1585719690" style="">
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can.

PHOTOSPORT
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can.
The Warriors players taken the incredibly selfless step of dipping into their own pockets to help the club stay afloat and staff keep their jobs.

Stuff can reveal that the leadership group at the club decided on Wednesday that they would donate their own money as CEO Cameron George looks to save as many jobs as possible while the NRL is shut down.

Across the world professional sportsmen and women are preparing to take pay cuts while the coronavirus pandemic has suspended all competitions.

But it's new for players to have been willing to take a pay cut while also giving money to their club to help it survive.


Warriors halfback Blake Green said the club's senior players wanted to show the front office staff that they're in this crisis together.

"It's tough times for everyone in society, not just the NRL and we've got so many fantastic people in our footy club," Green told Stuff.

"Our football staff are like many other NRL clubs, they could potentially be on leave without pay for three months or longer if the game doesn't return this year.


"We thought that as a playing group we could show our support. We've got a players' fund that we put money into every month and that pays for us to go to a team lunch, or a team activity.

Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit." data-xf-init="lightbox" data-lb-single-image="1" data-lb-container-zoom="1" data-lb-trigger=".js-lbImage-_xfUid-2-1585719690" data-lb-id="_xfUid-2-1585719690" style="">
Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit.

GETTY IMAGES
Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit.
"We decided that we'd make a bigger contribution into that pool this month and offer that money to the club.

"There are plenty of staff at the club who have young families and like everyone else, they're going to do it tough.

"The amount of money isn't going to match what's lost, but it's more the message behind it, that we're in this together. When your mates are hurting or need help, you help them out."

Green said he and other players in the leadership group, who are all in isolation, discussed what they could do to support the club.

The Warriors might only play two NRL games this season.

PHOTOSPORT
The Warriors might only play two NRL games this season.
"We saw at the beginning of the week that a few other clubs had made the decision to put their footy staff on leave without pay.

"I rang Roger (Tuivasa-Sheck), Tohu (Harris) and Adam (Blair) and suggested it.

"At the moment we face a lot of uncertainty as well and there's a big chance that this month is our last pay as well until the game resumes.

"But while we've still got the chance to provide some assistance to our footy club, we need to show our staff that we care and support them."

George said he was overwhelmed by the offer from the players.
 

Dunedin warrior

1st Grade Fringe
Nov 10, 2014
846
Well done team !!

Coronavirus: Players give money back to Warriors to help club survive and staff keep jobs

David Long, Stuff
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can." data-xf-init="lightbox" data-lb-single-image="1" data-lb-container-zoom="1" data-lb-trigger=".js-lbImage-_xfUid-4-1585719690" data-lb-id="_xfUid-4-1585719690" style="">
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can.

PHOTOSPORT
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can.
The Warriors players taken the incredibly selfless step of dipping into their own pockets to help the club stay afloat and staff keep their jobs.

Stuff can reveal that the leadership group at the club decided on Wednesday that they would donate their own money as CEO Cameron George looks to save as many jobs as possible while the NRL is shut down.

Across the world professional sportsmen and women are preparing to take pay cuts while the coronavirus pandemic has suspended all competitions.

But it's new for players to have been willing to take a pay cut while also giving money to their club to help it survive.


Warriors halfback Blake Green said the club's senior players wanted to show the front office staff that they're in this crisis together.

"It's tough times for everyone in society, not just the NRL and we've got so many fantastic people in our footy club," Green told Stuff.

"Our football staff are like many other NRL clubs, they could potentially be on leave without pay for three months or longer if the game doesn't return this year.


"We thought that as a playing group we could show our support. We've got a players' fund that we put money into every month and that pays for us to go to a team lunch, or a team activity.

Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit." data-xf-init="lightbox" data-lb-single-image="1" data-lb-container-zoom="1" data-lb-trigger=".js-lbImage-_xfUid-5-1585719690" data-lb-id="_xfUid-5-1585719690" style="">
Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit.

GETTY IMAGES
Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit.
"We decided that we'd make a bigger contribution into that pool this month and offer that money to the club.

"There are plenty of staff at the club who have young families and like everyone else, they're going to do it tough.

"The amount of money isn't going to match what's lost, but it's more the message behind it, that we're in this together. When your mates are hurting or need help, you help them out."

Green said he and other players in the leadership group, who are all in isolation, discussed what they could do to support the club.

The Warriors might only play two NRL games this season.

PHOTOSPORT
The Warriors might only play two NRL games this season.
"We saw at the beginning of the week that a few other clubs had made the decision to put their footy staff on leave without pay.

"I rang Roger (Tuivasa-Sheck), Tohu (Harris) and Adam (Blair) and suggested it.

"At the moment we face a lot of uncertainty as well and there's a big chance that this month is our last pay as well until the game resumes.

"But while we've still got the chance to provide some assistance to our footy club, we need to show our staff that we care and support them."

George said he was overwhelmed by the offer from the players.
They are a great bunch of fellas. If only they were good at rugby league.
 

wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
1,130
Tauranga
Well done team !!

Coronavirus: Players give money back to Warriors to help club survive and staff keep jobs

David Long, Stuff
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can." data-xf-init="lightbox" data-lb-single-image="1" data-lb-container-zoom="1" data-lb-trigger=".js-lbImage-_xfUid-7-1585719690" data-lb-id="_xfUid-7-1585719690" style="">
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can.

PHOTOSPORT
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can.
The Warriors players taken the incredibly selfless step of dipping into their own pockets to help the club stay afloat and staff keep their jobs.

Stuff can reveal that the leadership group at the club decided on Wednesday that they would donate their own money as CEO Cameron George looks to save as many jobs as possible while the NRL is shut down.

Across the world professional sportsmen and women are preparing to take pay cuts while the coronavirus pandemic has suspended all competitions.

But it's new for players to have been willing to take a pay cut while also giving money to their club to help it survive.


Warriors halfback Blake Green said the club's senior players wanted to show the front office staff that they're in this crisis together.

"It's tough times for everyone in society, not just the NRL and we've got so many fantastic people in our footy club," Green told Stuff.

"Our football staff are like many other NRL clubs, they could potentially be on leave without pay for three months or longer if the game doesn't return this year.


"We thought that as a playing group we could show our support. We've got a players' fund that we put money into every month and that pays for us to go to a team lunch, or a team activity.

Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit." data-xf-init="lightbox" data-lb-single-image="1" data-lb-container-zoom="1" data-lb-trigger=".js-lbImage-_xfUid-8-1585719690" data-lb-id="_xfUid-8-1585719690" style="">
Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit.

GETTY IMAGES
Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit.
"We decided that we'd make a bigger contribution into that pool this month and offer that money to the club.

"There are plenty of staff at the club who have young families and like everyone else, they're going to do it tough.

"The amount of money isn't going to match what's lost, but it's more the message behind it, that we're in this together. When your mates are hurting or need help, you help them out."

Green said he and other players in the leadership group, who are all in isolation, discussed what they could do to support the club.

The Warriors might only play two NRL games this season.

PHOTOSPORT
The Warriors might only play two NRL games this season.
"We saw at the beginning of the week that a few other clubs had made the decision to put their footy staff on leave without pay.

"I rang Roger (Tuivasa-Sheck), Tohu (Harris) and Adam (Blair) and suggested it.

"At the moment we face a lot of uncertainty as well and there's a big chance that this month is our last pay as well until the game resumes.

"But while we've still got the chance to provide some assistance to our footy club, we need to show our staff that we care and support them."

George said he was overwhelmed by the offer from the players.
As long as the club doesn’t feel obligated to repay the favour to Green and Blair next season!

Probably giving half their wages back and only getting paid their real worth🤔
 

gREVUS

Long live the Rainbows and Butterflies
Contributor
May 8, 2012
7,402
As long as the club doesn’t feel obligated to repay the favour to Green and Blair next season!

Probably giving half their wages back and only getting paid their real worth🤔
the way i read it was that they were going to gift the player fund, not their own cash. did i get it wrong.

the way its worded, the player fund is a sort of social fund?
 

Rick O'Shay

1st Grade Fringe
May 1, 2013
2,498
Although Green is too old and slow to be playing first grade, the guy has some nous and seems to be one of very few there who actually has a grip not only on the game but on club life in the NRL. We should pencil him for some sort of role. Old school question but do they still have a club captain?
 

leaguejunkie

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 20, 2016
1,789
Well done team !!

Coronavirus: Players give money back to Warriors to help club survive and staff keep jobs

David Long, Stuff
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can." data-xf-init="lightbox" data-lb-single-image="1" data-lb-container-zoom="1" data-lb-trigger=".js-lbImage-_xfUid-10-1585719690" data-lb-id="_xfUid-10-1585719690" style="">
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can.

PHOTOSPORT
Blake Green said the players wanted to help while they still can.
The Warriors players taken the incredibly selfless step of dipping into their own pockets to help the club stay afloat and staff keep their jobs.

Stuff can reveal that the leadership group at the club decided on Wednesday that they would donate their own money as CEO Cameron George looks to save as many jobs as possible while the NRL is shut down.

Across the world professional sportsmen and women are preparing to take pay cuts while the coronavirus pandemic has suspended all competitions.

But it's new for players to have been willing to take a pay cut while also giving money to their club to help it survive.


Warriors halfback Blake Green said the club's senior players wanted to show the front office staff that they're in this crisis together.

"It's tough times for everyone in society, not just the NRL and we've got so many fantastic people in our footy club," Green told Stuff.

"Our football staff are like many other NRL clubs, they could potentially be on leave without pay for three months or longer if the game doesn't return this year.


"We thought that as a playing group we could show our support. We've got a players' fund that we put money into every month and that pays for us to go to a team lunch, or a team activity.

Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit." data-xf-init="lightbox" data-lb-single-image="1" data-lb-container-zoom="1" data-lb-trigger=".js-lbImage-_xfUid-11-1585719690" data-lb-id="_xfUid-11-1585719690" style="">
Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit.

GETTY IMAGES
Adam Blair supported the idea donating money to the Warriors, even though NRL players are expected to take a financial hit.
"We decided that we'd make a bigger contribution into that pool this month and offer that money to the club.

"There are plenty of staff at the club who have young families and like everyone else, they're going to do it tough.

"The amount of money isn't going to match what's lost, but it's more the message behind it, that we're in this together. When your mates are hurting or need help, you help them out."

Green said he and other players in the leadership group, who are all in isolation, discussed what they could do to support the club.

The Warriors might only play two NRL games this season.

PHOTOSPORT
The Warriors might only play two NRL games this season.
"We saw at the beginning of the week that a few other clubs had made the decision to put their footy staff on leave without pay.

"I rang Roger (Tuivasa-Sheck), Tohu (Harris) and Adam (Blair) and suggested it.

"At the moment we face a lot of uncertainty as well and there's a big chance that this month is our last pay as well until the game resumes.

"But while we've still got the chance to provide some assistance to our footy club, we need to show our staff that we care and support them."

George said he was overwhelmed by the offer from the players.
This is heart warming stuff. Massive credit to Green and the senior playing group for doing this. What it shows is that we have a group of guys that have their heart in the right place and are committed to eachother and the club. To me, this means way more than winning footy games (although winning footy games is nice now and again, not going to lie 😀).
 

snake77

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 12, 2013
8,004
It was tough watching Shane Richardson on NRL 360 the other night. Firstly due to the way the screen was moving around like a found footage movie. Secondly cause how emotional he was getting about the financial state of the NRL.



He capitulated': Richardson savages former ARLC chair Grant over NRL finances

By Andrew Webster

March 27, 2020 — 12.01am

Don't do it, John. The game cannot afford it.

This was the warning several members of the NRL executive told former ARL Commission chairman John Grant before a critical meeting with the 16 club bosses on December 3, 2015.

They pleaded with Grant to refuse a demand to increase the clubs' annual grant to 130 per cent of the salary cap.

Grant's decision temporarily won him support from the clubs, who did not move to sack him in 2015. The financial cost to the game, however, would be heavy. That cost has been exposed in the current crisis.


"Instead, he capitulated," recalled Shane Richardson, who was the NRL's head of game development at the time having been charged by then chief executive Dave Smith to streamline the entire code. "Greed set in."

Richardson ended his 17-year association with the Rabbitohs on Thursday when he resigned to ease the burden of financial cost of the COVID-19 crisis on the club. He will remain as a consultant but the decision expedites his departure at the end of the 2021 season.

Shane Richardson with South Sydney CEO Blake Solly after Richardson's announcement that he would leave the club to save money due to the coronavirus crisis.

Shane Richardson with South Sydney CEO Blake Solly after Richardson's announcement that he would leave the club to save money due to the coronavirus crisis.CREDIT:WOLTER PEETERS

"It's an incredibly selfless gesture," Souths co-owner Russell Crowe said.

In a lengthy interview with the Herald, though, the ever-polarising "Richo" preferred to riff about the perilous state of the game and that time, in 2015, when he worked for the NRL mothership.

"I was sitting there with [NRL chief financial officer] Tony Crawford, the whole executive — we would look at the figures every day and say, 'This isn't sustainable'," Richardson said. "Todd [Greenberg] was the head of football at the time and, while he's not a real figures man, he's smart and fully understood the situation.



"The game couldn't afford the 130 per cent. We said this to John Grant. But there was pressure on him from a cartel of clubs wanting more money; from player agents; from people inside the game; all wanting more money.

"We knew things had to change to make the game viable — but the clubs didn't want to hear it. When the $13m was put up there in front of them, they grabbed it. It shouldn't have been a decision just about the clubs. It should have been for the whole game."

Indeed, there's been plenty of finger pointing since the NRL competition shuddered to an indefinite halt because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Understandably, with no money coming in and hundreds of football people being stood down, questions are being asked about where the cash reserves are for a code that has secured billions in broadcast revenue in recent years.

It's unfair to skewer Grant for the game's current financial predicament, which has been exposed by a crisis that no one could have predicted. However, many remember that moment when Grant agreed to the clubs' demands and kept his job in the process. In the end, the clubs pushed him out a year later anyway.


"John Grant was one of my heroes growing up," Richardson said. "He was a Queenslander, a smart businessman. I'm just not sure he understood how difficult the politics of rugby league were and how vested interests were always going to be difficult to control.

"I think he thought he could talk sense into them. When it got to the crunch, and he realised he couldn't, I honestly believe he panicked.

"I'm sure he never got any money out of what he did. But when you are faced with those sorts of decisions, you need to cop the crap from club land, from sections of the media — because we had a real plan."

Richardson reckoned he had a plan, albeit a controversial one. Within weeks of Souths winning the 2014 premiership, Smith convinced him to leave Souths, where he had been chief executive since 2003, to join head office and come up with a "whole of game" strategy.


Richardson's' pay packet was rumoured to be massive.

"People go on about my wage," Richardson said. "My wage wasn't over the top. We would've saved millions so my wage would've been inconsequential."

Over the next year, Richardson spoke to countless people across the game "from under-6s to the NRL". He travelled to the US to study minor league baseball, which was turning profits, and seeing how that could be adopted in the lower tiers of rugby league. He then came up with his recommendations.

"It was a comprehensive plan that broke down the game's finances from the bottom to the top, and talked about a whole-of-game approach about the changes that needed to be made to streamline the game, to make it more efficient, to make it worthwhile, to replace things that hadn't worked for a hundred years: things like boundaries on junior leagues, about the reliance on leagues clubs, all the way through to the NRL.

"There would be a restriction on what could be spent on the lower tier; cutting back ridiculous money on young players before their time, spending $40,000 in some cases. That money could be reinvested into the state leagues, the famous 'Platinum League', that would bring in teams from the country as well as Fiji and Samoa …

"We wanted to decentralise the NRL, which would simply concentrate on the elite competition. Their staff would be minimal now."

Former ARL Commission chairman John Grant in 2016 as the clubs pressured him into resigning.

Former ARL Commission chairman John Grant in 2016 as the clubs pressured him into resigning.CREDIT:CHRISTOPHER PEARCE

Richardson presented his paper to the commission and it was accepted. Then the clubs caught wind of what was being recommended.

"The clubs had vested interests," he said. "They wanted to keep 9000 juniors to themselves, still wanting to stockpile young players. There were texts to John Grant about what an arsehole I was, and they hadn't even read the paper.


"We've all sat here as administrators and allowed football budgets to go ridiculously high. If we had the cap at $8m instead of $10m, we'd have $10m per club more in the game [over the five-year period of the broadcast deal]. We should've built up a cash reserve … Instead we went $49m into deficit. Who makes a business decision where you haven't got enough money for the next year?"

When Smith finished up at the NRL in late 2015, Richardson lost his biggest supporter. When Grant gave the clubs what they wanted, he knew he, too, had to go.

"I said to John, 'This is ridiculous because there's no point in me staying if I can't implement what I want to do'," Richardson said. "Todd and I were the obvious people to go for the CEO's role. But I said, 'Todd, you are the man for the job because you can handle the politics. I can't'."

Richardson returned to Souths in 2016 at the behest of Crowe, but in recent times has butted heads with chairman Nick Pappas, who tried to push him out the door late last year.

He's uncertain what his future holds – "I'm sure there's a feedbag out there for me somewhere!" — but he's convinced ARLC chairman Peter V'landys is the right man to navigate the game through troubled times.

"Plastic balls have to become titanium ones," Richardson said. "Hopefully, the strong leader in V'landys can drive us through. I can see it in his eyes. They are beady little eyes, focussing in. I wouldn't want them focussing on me. He's single-minded in what he wants to do.

"Nobody could've seen what was coming with the coronavirus, but what it's done is made the errors of the past blatantly clear. If we make the same decisions now, we will die. But there's no doubt V'landys knows what to do.

Grant did not return calls or texts offering him the chance to comment.

 
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snake77

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 12, 2013
8,004
I was always interested on what Richardson would recommend when he was working in the NRL. It had the potential for big changes and also cause a lot of disruption especially for the state competition. I think the main thing that came out of it was the winners of the two grand final winners playing off against each other.

In the end his appointment was a waste.

This article is typical of the politics in running rugby league. Clubs aligning to over throw the chairman, chairman relents to save his own skin. Club bosses complain about a report they likely haven't read.

If Grant had not relented and the clubs sacked him and the next guy also said the game couldn't afford it. How many chairman would we go through until the clubs got the message or we got a chairman who relented.

This also highlights the issues with the current structure. The Commission was supposed to be able to make the big decisions and develop the strategy going forward. The clubs technically own the NRL now and can push their wait around applying pressure to get what they want. The Commission recommending to go down to a 14 team comp with less Syndey teams, no chance.
 

snake77

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 12, 2013
8,004
Bruce posted this article. It might have been in the "How the Cornovirus will affect the NRL thread". Like most Roy Masters articles Its a good read.

I suspect there would be cuts for the nrl.com site as well. The article also highlights the debate on the value of the site. It goes over the site being a news source and a bit around digital rights.

The key quote right at the end. NRL clubs have reaped what they sowed.