General 2019 Season rule amendments

Wellington Warrior

Warriors 1st Grader
May 15, 2012
5,321
Wellington, New Zealand
2019 season rule amendments
Tue 18 Dec 2018, 05:30 PM
The NRL today announced changes to the rules which will come into effect from the 2019 NRL Telstra Premiership season.

Head of Football – Elite Competitions, Graham Annesley said the changes were aimed at increasing "ball in play" time and improving player safety.

The new rules for 2019 will include:

• A reduction of the scrum clock – reducing from 35 to 30 seconds

• A reduction of the drop-out clock – reducing from 30 to 25 seconds

• An increase to dangerous contact neck or head charges – with Grade 2 increasing to 300 points and Grade 3 increasing to 500 points (a Grade 1 charge will remain at 100 points)

• Any player sent to the sin bin or sent off will be required to run from the field of play, taking the most direct route to the dressing room. Failure to do so may lead to Clubs being breached and fined under NRL Rules and/or offending players may be charged with Contrary Conduct under the NRL Judiciary Code

• Allowing the Judiciary Panel to find a player guilty of an alternative charge when charged with a Shoulder Charge (e.g. Dangerous Contact)

Mr Annesley also confirmed that no change would be made to the number of interchange players for season 2019.

But he said further assessment will be conducted throughout the first half of next season, before a decision is made on any future reductions for 2020 onwards.

Mr Annesley said the amendments were designed to reduce the amount of stoppage time in games, increase the time the ball is in play and simplify operational practices and procedures.

The increased penalties for dangerous contact to neck and head follows a rise in the number of crusher tackles last season.

"There is clearly an unacceptable risk of injury from these tackles and we believe we need to have an adequate deterrent in place to improve player safety," Mr Annesley said.

"We have a world-class competition, with the 2018 season the closest in more than a decade," Mr Annesley said.

"But we can always improve and our aim with these rule amendments is to continue to deliver exciting and engaging matches for players, fans, broadcasters and all our stakeholders."
 

mrblonde

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 14, 2012
3,573
Auckland
I'd rather they added an extra minute on to the sin bin time for each minute the player took leave the field.

Dawdle and walk the slowest, longest way to the sideline and take 3 minutes to do so? 13 minute sin bin.
 

smc

1st Grade Fringe
May 19, 2012
752
wierd that they are allowing an alternative charge for shoulder charges. i really dont know what this means
Like being charged with murder but being found guilty of manslaughter.
I assume this comes in due to the Billy Slater shit show.
 

Sup42

Warriors 1st Grader
May 7, 2012
17,357
Like being charged with murder but being found guilty of manslaughter.
I assume this comes in due to the Billy Slater shit show.
Could be.

I took it as relating to the Napa tackle, giving them a stronger punishment pathway.

You are probably right.
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
15,500
Maybe wrong thread...but...
The rule change that threatens to make NRL more like AFL

NRL wingers now come bubble-wrapped following a rule change which means they can’t be tackled in the air, guaranteeing them more tries from kicks this season than at any time in the code’s history.

The rule change advantages clubs with tall, athletic wingers, such as the Roosters’ Daniel Tupou, as well as pinpoint kickers.

In fact, the rule change will have such impact it’s no exaggeration to say the Roosters could be three-times successive premiers if half Cooper Cronk had not retired.

However, the expected counter to the anticipated record season of aerial bombardment is to make rugby league look like AFL.

A defensive winger, realising he can’t get his hands on a ball descending into the in-goal and aware he can’t make contact with his opponent once that player has the pigskin in his hands, will punch the ball away, as AFL players do to spoil a mark.
The rule change, introduced in secrecy by the ARLC at the end of last year, brings the NRL in line with an international law which prohibits players being tackled in mid-air once they have the ball in their hands.

Obviously, it’s illegal to tackle defensive wingers but the rule change now applies to attacking wingers as well. The Australian amendment to the rule was forced by club medicos, concerned at the vulnerability of players to injury when tackled mid-air.

The Sydney Morning Herald recently put to NRL head of football, Graham Annesley, the following scenario in the context of the rule change: if an attacking player in the in-goal reaches for the ball in the air, taking it with both hands, flips his body, so he is now falling arms first, rather than feet first, who can stop him scoring a try?



Annesley’s response? "That’s exactly why we had the old rule in. But it got to the point where player safety overcame the concerns about the way a try could be scored in the scenario you just outlined."

Yet, how many attacking wingers over the past five years have been injured from being tackled in mid-air?

A few phone calls revealed that NRL clubs have been furiously practising in-goal kicks to tall wingers in the pre-season.

Obviously, if the ball lands short of the in-goal, despite the attacking winger falling to ground untouched, it is not a try and probably a handover.







If the attacking player does take the kick in goal but lands feet first, he can still be held up by the defence because he is no longer mid-air.

Rugby league in Australia has long resisted changing the rule, aware it is the only occasion where a player can no longer defend his own goal line.

The old rule makers reasoned that attacking wingers already had a significant advantage over the defensive winger.

The attacking player is running onto the ball, following its path, ready to leap high onto it, while the defensive player has his feet fixed on the ground.

To even out the contest, the old NRL decreed the defensive winger couldn’t be taken out mid-air and the attacking player could be tackled in order to allow players to defend their goal line.



Now, however, the ARLC has put a red cross insignia on attacking wingers, meaning they are immune from contact once they have the ball in their hands while off the ground.

Coaches who instruct their defensive players to make contact with the ball, rather than the attack, by punching it away, over the sideline or dead ball line, recognise it is a negative tactic.

After all, the attack will get the ball back via a goal line dropout, but at least it stops a certain try.

Furthermore, it’s not in the spirit of the game. But try telling that to a coach playing the Roosters, or the Cowboys with tall wingers, such as Kyle Feldt and Nene MacDonald.







Wingers have become excitement machines in the modern game, particularly since the decision was made to render the corner post no longer part of the field. It meant acrobatic wingers can force the ball millimetres from the sideline, despite knocking the corner post over with their legs.

Now, however, they have been licensed to score tries untouched while in the air, with the ARL Commission putting a glass booth around them, like the Pope has.
 
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Worried2Death

1st Grade Fringe
Mar 6, 2016
2,126
Maybe wrong thread...but...
The rule change that threatens to make NRL more like AFL

NRL wingers now come bubble-wrapped following a rule change which means they can’t be tackled in the air, guaranteeing them more tries from kicks this season than at any time in the code’s history.

The rule change advantages clubs with tall, athletic wingers, such as the Roosters’ Daniel Tupou, as well as pinpoint kickers.

In fact, the rule change will have such impact it’s no exaggeration to say the Roosters could be three-times successive premiers if half Cooper Cronk had not retired.

However, the expected counter to the anticipated record season of aerial bombardment is to make rugby league look like AFL.

A defensive winger, realising he can’t get his hands on a ball descending into the in-goal and aware he can’t make contact with his opponent once that player has the pigskin in his hands, will punch the ball away, as AFL players do to spoil a mark.
The rule change, introduced in secrecy by the ARLC at the end of last year, brings the NRL in line with an international law which prohibits players being tackled in mid-air once they have the ball in their hands.

Obviously, it’s illegal to tackle defensive wingers but the rule change now applies to attacking wingers as well. The Australian amendment to the rule was forced by club medicos, concerned at the vulnerability of players to injury when tackled mid-air.

The Sydney Morning Herald recently put to NRL head of football, Graham Annesley, the following scenario in the context of the rule change: if an attacking player in the in-goal reaches for the ball in the air, taking it with both hands, flips his body, so he is now falling arms first, rather than feet first, who can stop him scoring a try?



Annesley’s response? "That’s exactly why we had the old rule in. But it got to the point where player safety overcame the concerns about the way a try could be scored in the scenario you just outlined."

Yet, how many attacking wingers over the past five years have been injured from being tackled in mid-air?

A few phone calls revealed that NRL clubs have been furiously practising in-goal kicks to tall wingers in the pre-season.

Obviously, if the ball lands short of the in-goal, despite the attacking winger falling to ground untouched, it is not a try and probably a handover.







If the attacking player does take the kick in goal but lands feet first, he can still be held up by the defence because he is no longer mid-air.

Rugby league in Australia has long resisted changing the rule, aware it is the only occasion where a player can no longer defend his own goal line.

The old rule makers reasoned that attacking wingers already had a significant advantage over the defensive winger.

The attacking player is running onto the ball, following its path, ready to leap high onto it, while the defensive player has his feet fixed on the ground.

To even out the contest, the old NRL decreed the defensive winger couldn’t be taken out mid-air and the attacking player could be tackled in order to allow players to defend their goal line.



Now, however, the ARLC has put a red cross insignia on attacking wingers, meaning they are immune from contact once they have the ball in their hands while off the ground.

Coaches who instruct their defensive players to make contact with the ball, rather than the attack, by punching it away, over the sideline or dead ball line, recognise it is a negative tactic.

After all, the attack will get the ball back via a goal line dropout, but at least it stops a certain try.

Furthermore, it’s not in the spirit of the game. But try telling that to a coach playing the Roosters, or the Cowboys with tall wingers, such as Kyle Feldt and Nene MacDonald.







Wingers have become excitement machines in the modern game, particularly since the decision was made to render the corner post no longer part of the field. It meant acrobatic wingers can force the ball millimetres from the sideline, despite knocking the corner post over with their legs.

Now, however, they have been licensed to score tries untouched while in the air, with the ARL Commission putting a glass booth around them, like the Pope has.
Surely we're going to take advantage of this, our wings are made for this rule.
 
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Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
8,467
Surely we're going to take advantage of this, our wings are made for this rule.
Our wingers maybe tailor-made for this rule but is our coach ready to exploit it?
 
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wizards rage

1st Grade Fringe
Apr 18, 2016
2,481
Tauranga
I can’t see the rule being a massive change.

Can you no longer tackle them or touch them (compete)?

Surely the defender will just contest as they do now and act as a spoiler if they can’t gather possession or set and then drive the tackler as they touch the ground if outside the try line.

Very few times do I remember the defender tackling the attacker in the air as the few times it happened there were big complaints over it.
 
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Rick O'Shay

Warriors 1st Grader
May 1, 2013
3,359
Will be the usual clusterfuck with referees interpretations. Expect a heap of penalty's in the early part of the season. NRL must have been the only code left that didn't have the cotton wool rule, Union went down that path a few years ago.

Should suit us if executed correctly especially the Fusitua but relies on a pin point kicking game
 

gREVUS

Long live the Rainbows and Butterflies
Contributor
May 8, 2012
8,168
Will be the usual clusterfuck with referees interpretations. Expect a heap of penalty's in the early part of the season. NRL must have been the only code left that didn't have the cotton wool rule, Union went down that path a few years ago.

Should suit us if executed correctly especially the Fusitua but relies on a pin point kicking game
inside the 20 i think green can handle it, outside the twenty, well they didnt bother to contest most of those anyway.

Also add to this the 40/20 rule and there will be a lot more kicking to the edges in this years game. Having scramblers who can get back is really going to be important.

Lastly if this is the way they want to go, maybe removing the blocking rule would simplify things. You know a runner can be shepherded off the ball, but once he leaves the ground hes sacrosanct. Hell they pretty much do this anyway.
 
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gREVUS

Long live the Rainbows and Butterflies
Contributor
May 8, 2012
8,168
What happens if the attacker is tackled in the air over the tryline with ball in hand from a kick, penalty try?
it would have to be, if they have the ball in hand and are lower in the upper body but still off the ground then it must be an interference in a guaranteed try. It surely must reach the 90 percent category.

Mind you if its a warriors player, watch it called as a fair tackle.
 
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gREVUS

Long live the Rainbows and Butterflies
Contributor
May 8, 2012
8,168
BTW who is going to adjudicate the captains call? or is that still only a trial. My question is does a captains call work on a ruling by the video ref? if so is it ruled on by the video ref?
 
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matiunz

All Out!
Contributor
Jul 15, 2013
7,234
Sydney
BTW who is going to adjudicate the captains call? or is that still only a trial. My question is does a captains call work on a ruling by the video ref? if so is it ruled on by the video ref?
My understanding is it’s for the video ref to review rulings made by the onfield refs. Would be a waste of time to say challenge a video refs decision on a try. Think it can also only be made during stoppages in play (eg scrums kicks for touch) and only within 10 seconds as they don’t want players seeing the big screen replays before challenging
 
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gREVUS

Long live the Rainbows and Butterflies
Contributor
May 8, 2012
8,168
My understanding is it’s for the video ref to review rulings made by the onfield refs. Would be a waste of time to say challenge a video refs decision on a try. Think it can also only be made during stoppages in play (eg scrums kicks for touch) and only within 10 seconds as they don’t want players seeing the big screen replays before challenging
Yeah I see it as a non event with that 10 sec rule. At most it will be used as a tactical stoppage in play. Probably to allow a team a reset
 
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