General 2015 Warriors Where Are They Now?

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Glad to have struck off another two players off this list in Brady Malam and Jason Temu.

Russell Packer is training with the Illawarra Cutters so we should be able to update him soon if he starts playing for them.

Only 25 players left guys :)...

13. Tony Tuimavave - 45 - ??? Link
14. Se'e Solomona - 49 - ??? Living in Townsville Link
16. Jason Mackie - 45 - ??? Link

19. Syd Eru - 43 - ??? Link
31. Mark Carter - 46 - ??? Link
38. Bryan Henare - 40 - ??? Still living in Auckland but thats I can find out at the moment Link
45. Paul Staladi - 39 - ??? Link
49. David Bailey - 45 - ???Link
54. Zane Clark - ???Link
60. Terry Hermansson - ??? Possibly living in Christchurch Link
63. Peter Lewis - 35 - ??? Link
69. John Simon - 42 - ??? Link
74. Matt Spence - 38 - ??? Link
80. Shontayne Hape - 33 - ??? Travelling the world at the moment Link
84. Jonathan Smith - 35 - ??? Link
95. John Carlaw - 39 - ??? Possibly medical supplies sales
106. Vince Mellars - 30 - ??? Possibly retired and living in Brisbane Link
116. Shannon Stowers - 35 - ??? Link
120. Paul Atkins - 32 -??? Link
132. Wade McKinnon - 33 - ??? Link
133. Michael Crockett - ??? Link
134. Michael Witt - 31 - ??? Retired from Rugby League and looking to get into coaching Link
141. Russell Packer - 25 - ??? Just released from jail Link
155. Siuatonga Likiliki - 24 - ??? Living in Gold Coast, Australia and currently without a contract Link
161. Mataupu Poching - 26 - ??? Link
Can knock off Tony Tuimavave, Se'e Solomona and Jason Mackie after an article by Corey Rosser. Follow the link to the whole article as Ive only posted the bits relevant to this thread...

Tony Tuimavave

Then: A barnstorming forward renowned for his toughness, 'The Chief' brought some mongrel to the team.

Now: Still living in Auckland.

Se'e Solomona

Then: A big-bopper who wouldn't back down, was seen as a vital cog to then coach John Monie's front-row rotation.

Now: Living in Townsville where he is a psychologist working with local kids.

Jason Mackie

Then: A home-grown talent who never really kicked on at the club, playing in the inaugural team before spending most of his time in Auckland playing reserve grade.

Now: Working in the mining industry in Queensland

https://www.nrl.com/once-were-warriors-celebrating-20-years/tabid/10874/newsid/84867/default.aspx
 

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Only 22 players left guys :). If anyone can help with any of the following please let us know...

19. Syd Eru - 43 - ??? Link
31. Mark Carter - 46 - ??? Link
38. Bryan Henare - 40 - ??? Still living in Auckland but thats I can find out at the moment Link
45. Paul Staladi - 39 - ??? Link
49. David Bailey - 45 - ???Link
54. Zane Clark - ???Link
60. Terry Hermansson - ??? Possibly living in Christchurch Link
63. Peter Lewis - 35 - ??? Link
69. John Simon - 42 - ??? Link
74. Matt Spence - 38 - ??? Link
80. Shontayne Hape - 33 - ??? Travelling the world at the moment Link
84. Jonathan Smith - 35 - ??? Link
95. John Carlaw - 39 - ??? Possibly medical supplies sales
106. Vince Mellars - 30 - ??? Possibly retired and living in Brisbane Link
116. Shannon Stowers - 35 - ???Link
120. Paul Atkins - 32 -??? Link
132. Wade Mckinnon - 33 - ??? Link
133. Michael Crockett - ??? Link
134. Michael Witt - 31 - ??? Retired from Rugby League and looking to get into coaching Link
141. Russell Packer - 25 - ??? Just released from jail Link
155. Siuatonga Likiliki - 24 - ??? Living in Gold Coast, Australia and currently without a contract Link
161. Mataupu Poching - 26 - ??? Link
 

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
UPDATE...

Titans import Agnatius Paasi to extend NRL career after being granted 12-month Australian visa
April 4, 2015 11:00pm
Peter BadelThe Courier-Mail
external


The former Warriors bookend played his fifth NRL game against the Broncos on Friday night and is determined to be a fixture at the Titans beyond this season.

“The good news is that my visa has been sorted out,” Paasi said.

“I got the visa approved during the week so I was happy to get the news from the government.

“I’m not a permanent resident but I am allowed to stay here until next year. If the Titans want me, I will be able to extend the visa.

“It’s a relief. My partner always told me not to worry about it, to be patient and focus on football and thankfully I’m allowed to stay in Australia.”

31bf20fecb5b192f00fd7103bafb141e

Paasi is now hoping the Titans extend his NRL contract as well.

Paasi limped out of Cbus Super Stadium on Friday night with his left ankle encased in a compression boot, but is hopeful of being fit to face Parramatta this Saturday night.

“I have a little crack in the ligament, but I’ll ice it, leave it in the moon boot and I should be OK next week. The doc says it’s just bruising,” he said.

The real pain, however, has been his lonely life in Australia as he chased his NRL dream without wife Chloe and their three-year-old son Manatoa.

“It’s been really hard not seeing them,” Paasi said.

“Chloe is still back at home with our son. It’s been hard, I’ve been really lonely at times but the boys at the Titans have been very supportive.

“My partner has one semester left of university and when she graduates she will move to Australia.

“I haven’t seen them for three months now, but I call them every day to stay in touch and that keeps me on track.”

The 106kg hardman has caught the eye with his no-nonsense charges up the middle, but admits he is still learning the nuances of rugby league.

“I’m actually a rugby kid,” he said. “Growing up, I would watch the All Blacks and I didn’t play league until my final year of school, when Keebra Park (Gold Coast school) spotted me at some trials in New Zealand.

“I am enjoying my time at the Titans, so hopefully I keep improving and I can stay here for a couple more years.”

https://m.couriermail.com.au/sport/n...-australian-visa/story-fniabrr8-1227291444382

https://www.nzwarriors.com/threads/2015-where-are-they-now.40187/page-13#post-492939
 

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Former player Ali Lauitiiti had a Testimonial dinner at the start of the month (01/06/15) to mark his 10th year in Super League. So basically he left the club 10 years ago. At his dinner were a few friends that we would recognise as former players.

Congrats Ali...

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Congratulations to Ali. I remember when he left a lot of the talk back radio callers were saying he wouldn't last in the UK. I've heard that about a few of the Polynesian players. Well Ali Lauitiiti, Francis Meli, Iafeta Paleaaesina, and Motu Tony and quite a few others have left and we haven't seen them playing in this side of the world since.

Glad they have all gone over their and had good careers a shame we haven't seen as much of their careers as we would have if they were playing for the Warriors.

Also great to see the familiar faces in that photograph.
 
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Congrats to the big man. It's great that Ali's gone on to have a huge career over there (in addition to what he achieved with the Warriors/Kiwis before he left), but he's one of those players I'll always remember in the 'what could have been' way. From a GF appearance and NRL second rower of the year in 2002 to released in 2004. I know he had a health issue in 2003 and the team was struggling in 2004 when he was released, but I still remember how surprised I was when I heard the club had released him. At his best, he was a devastating player. Sadly the move to get rid of him didn't pay off, with us only winning 6 games in total that year. Only the Bunnies kept us from claiming the spoon that year. Again, it's awesome that Ali went on to be so successful.
 
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mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Interesting write up on Shane Endacott as he talks about his days at the Warriors as well as what he's doing now. To see his entry in this thread follow the link below.

CRL = Canterbury Rugby League

https://www.nzwarriors.com/threads/2015-where-are-they-now.40187/page-3#post-491967

CRL Legend Series No.1 - Shane Endacott

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Throughout the season, we'll be featuring Canterbury Rugby League's past playing and coaching greats in a series of in-depth interviews.

First in the series is Shane Endacott, a Junior Kiwis representative and Canterbury provincial rep from 1992-94. After his first professional stint with English club Hull FC, Endacott – the son of legendary Canterbury, New Zealand, Auckland Warriors and Wigan coach Frank – joined the Warriors in 1996.

One of the most versatile players of the late-1990s, Endacott featured in the Warriors' reserve grade Grand Final team in '96 and shared his 42 first grade appearances (1997-99) between five-eighth, centre, hooker, lock and the interchange bench.

Endacott retired aged just 28 and remained in Auckland for several years to pursue business interests before returning to Canterbury in 2006. He has been heavily involved with coaching in the region, including stints with Celebration, Halswell (where he won a premiership in 2011) and this year at Papanui.



CAREER OVERVIEW



Club career

Papanui

Sydnenham

Canterbury Cardinals (1994): 12 games - 3 tries (12 points)

Hull (1994-95)

Christchurch City Shiners (1995): 8 games - 2 tries (8 points)

Auckland Warriors (1997-99: 42 games - 3 tries (12 points)


Representative career

Junior Kiwis (1990)

Canterbury (1992-94): 7 games - 7 tries (28 points)

New Zealand XIII (1996): 1 game - 2 tries (8 points)


What are you foremost memories of playing junior club footy in Canterbury?

It was Papanui and Sydenham a premier level, but most of my early football was at Hornby. It was quite funny how we started actually, I wasn't really aware there was a game called Rugby League to be honest. Even though Dad (Frank) played he was very reluctant to get any of us four boys involved. Maybe that was the physical aspect of the game, I'm not sure. I went down to play soccer actually, and I couldn't have been any good, because they said 'no, we've got enough players, no thanks'. So Mum said, 'why don't you have a go at League'.

Dad actually refused to take me to my first three of four trainings. He said I was too much of a Mummy's boy, and too soft, so Mum actually took me to my first few trainings at Hornby. I went pretty good and Dad suddenly got interested, and he ended up coaching us – I think he coached us from 10s to 17s. Previous to that, he'd coached Addington and Hornby to Grand Finals.

We had a real good group of young men and we became a fairly good side. One year, in the 17s, we got about seven players in the Kiwi from one club. It just shows you how important that good coaching is at that level. Because we were an average team; we used to get hammered by teams like Kaiapoi and Aranui that were bigger and stronger, but we stuck with the skills and we caught up in size, and suddenly we were the better side.



What position did you play as a junior?

I was a loose forward; I was New Zealand captain one year, and we had guys like Steve Kearney and Syd Eru who didn't even make that Kiwi side, so I was at the top of my game at that stage. Unfortunately, at that stage I got quite a bad injury. With all the football I was playing, I was also playing senior rep touch; I was still a schoolboy, and I was going through that growing stage and playing a lot of sport, and I got two stress fractures in my lower back.

I was told that I wouldn't play League again at any great level. I lost the power game, I couldn't do any weights. I wasn't allowed to load my spine up so I couldn't do squats or power clings. So I sat down with my sports doctor and said, 'what do I do? Do I give up the game?', and his recommendation was don't chuck it in but work on what you can work on, which was fitness and skills. So I decided at that stage to start playing at 6 (five-eighth), because I knew that without that power component I wouldn't make it in the forwards anymore.

I struggled a little bit, because I was a skilful 13 (lock) but five-eighth's a totally different position. I never really had a great kicking game, my passing game could've been a lot better. But I think my understanding of the game, sheer determination, work ethic and fitness got me through in the end and, yeah, proved a lot of people wrong.

But having a brother (Gary) with cerebral palsy sort of inspires you, and when you do feel sorry for yourself – you think 'what if', if I didn't get that injury I could've probably been three times the player that I was – but hey, you play the cards you're given. My brother Gary, he's done many things people said he couldn't achieve either.

Once I got to top level, because I was an average player, I was a bit of a gap-filler. One week I'd train and play at hooker, the next week I'd be in the centres, the next week I'd be at 6, the next two weeks I'd be on the bench covering four different positions.



What were your highlights representing Canterbury?

Getting coached by Dad was a highlight because he was probably considered the best coach in New Zealand at that stage. The highlight really was probably my first game for Canterbury (in 1992), it was against Bay of Plenty, and I managed to score three tries. And that actually led to a contract a couple of years later. (Former Kiwis coach) Tony Gordon was the Bay of Plenty coach and then he got a job at Hull, and I think it was because of that one performance he brought me and a couple of other Canterbury players, Tevita Vaikona and Maea David, over and we got that English contract.

Beating the Auckland side (in 1994) was another highlight. Stacey Jones was their halfback and probably their best player; I think he was only 17. The player I marked that day at five-eighth was 'Bluey' McClennan, the future Kiwis and Warriors coach. It's quite funny how you play with or against guys that become coaches – 'Bluey', I played against him; Stephen Kearney was a teammate in age-group rep teams; the current England coach, Steve McNamara, was my captain at Hull. It's quite a buzz when you see those boys coaching now.



Playing in Hull in that 1994-95 season must have been an eye-opener?

It was. We were a bit set up to be honest, the three of us, because we were all just kids. Tevita Vaikona, who ended up being a bit of a legend over there, at that stage he'd only been playing League for less than a year. He got plucked out of third division at Lincoln. Maea David was a strong boy. But we'd only just started playing rep football here; we didn't really know what we were heading in for. They told us they'd blood us in at 'B' level for a few weeks and give us a wee feel of it gradually during the season.

We arrived on the Thursday and we were front-page news on the Friday – we were the next Kemble, Leuluai, O'Hara! And I think at that stage Hull had lost their first nine games and we were meant to be the saviours. Well, we were just kids, we were inexperienced and we got chucked in the deep end. They did us no favours to be honest [laughs], we tried our best. The three us were chucked in this small Coronation Street-type house, we got this 25-year-old Rover, a shitty old car, between us that we had to share. I think for the first four months we slept on mattresses on the floor. It was certainly not what we thought we were getting ourselves in for, and hence Maea and I ripped up our second-year contracts and Tevita stayed on but went to Bradford eventually.

I can remember, I think it was my second training there, and the coach was doing kick-off sets and I reckon they dropped about seven kick-offs in a row and I'm thinking, 'what the hell am I doing here?'. But they were good people and they made us welcome. And if anything, it didn't help my attacking game because it was still played in the winter back then. It probably toughened me up as a person. I was straight out of university, had no money, still lived at home, so it was a real learning curve. And defensively – I was probably more of an attacking player and a weak defender, but when I came back from the UK, I think I was more of a defensive player.



Where did you fall into the Super League signing frenzy during the mid-1990s?

Because I was an average player I was on average money, and I didn't really give a toss what other guys were earning. I was happy with what I was getting and I was happy for the opportunity. I'll give you an example: I was playing first grade on $10,000 a year, and one of my teammates was on $660,000 a year. So you could say I was playing for $500 a game and some of them were playing for up to $30,000 a game. It's not like rugby (union), they're not all on similar money, there is a real tier system in the NRL. Joe Bloggs watching the TV would expect all 17 players being of equal talent, but when you spend a lot of money on a handful, you've got to have the lesser players there as well. And I was a lesser player, and I was actually brought to the Warriors because of my work ethic.

First year (1995), the Warriors' reserve grade had a star-studded side, they had many Kiwis. The problem was some of those Kiwis thought they probably should have been playing first grade, so they probably switched off attitude-wise. They weren't teaching those young guys the work ethic – I think they probably taught them drinking games! (Warriors coach) John Monie got Aaron Whittaker, who was at Wakefield at that stage, and myself from Hull, and he brought us back to the club and said, 'look, we don't expect you to play first grade, but you're here to teach the younger guys about work ethic' – the Nigel Vaganas, the Logan Swanns, teach them that if you work hard you can make it.

And that year (1996) I think we won 16 on the trot to reach the (reserve grade) Grand Final, which we lost 14-12 to Cronulla. I remember putting up a bomb and Tony Tuimavave catching it to score but the touch judge called him offside, which I thought was a rough call. That was one of my most enjoyable years; as a League player you like to hold your position, it helps you become a better player. In first grade, I was always here and there, and I was never really good enough to cement a position. So my football never really advanced. But in reserve grade, Aaron and I played the whole 25 games as halfback and five-eighth. And you always knew there was Nigel Vagana outside you, or Anthony Swann hitting the holes; it made a huge difference and I think that's why the year was so successful.



Did you feel being coach by Frank, for Canterbury and the Warriors, put any extra pressure on you?

Oh, it surely did. I was in a no-win situation and he probably was as well. It wasn't a lot of extra pressure really, you've just got to have thick skin. I was there (at the Warriors) for the right reasons, I was there to teach these younger guys about work ethic, and my 40-odd first grade games was really a bonus for me. I never envisaged playing first grade, but it was probably more pressure for him than me.



You made your first grade debut in 1997 only a few weeks before John Monie was sacked. It was a tumultuous time for the club, and the game in general – do you look back at those times with fond memories?

Yeah, I felt for John. I just don't think he probably handled the Islander boys as well as he could have. He was a good coach. He was quite hard, you know; I looked at Dad and he had real people skills, and I couldn't understand why John was so hard-nosed. But looking back now, his career was near the end then and he would have been burnt by a number of clubs and a number of players. It's a business, and you can only be shit on so many times before you become hard-nosed and he would have been let down by so many players over the years, and that's why he was so defensive at times. I managed to get quite a few games under John before he got the sack, and he was certainly a good coach.



The 1997 season wasn't a great one for the Warriors in the Super League competition, but you did well in the World Club Challenge – that must have been a buzz?

It was, I think I played in six of the seven games. The only one I missed was against Warrington at Warrington. It was an interesting time; you got to know your teammates when you toured. A good story to come out then was Marc Ellis, he got a pretty bad broken nose just before halftime in our first game on that tour against St Helens. I still remember Marc saying he didn't want to go back on because of his TV career! Big Frankie told him to toughen up and get back out there. The following two games, which were against Bradford and Warrington, he missed with a strained hamstring and I saw it come out in his book that he actually made the hamstring injury up, it was more to do with his nose.

But to beat those English sides – teams that we'd struggled to even compete with when I was at Hull – to actually beat them, and demolish them in some circumstances, it was a bit of a buzz.

Also in that competition I can remember getting a getting a good hiding from Steve Renouf. It was the semi-final, it was worth a couple of million to win the whole thing, and Brisbane were the hot favourites. I managed to score a try early that night and Renouf had scored five tries in the previous game, in the quarter-final (against St Helens), and Dad said if you get a chance, upset him, put him off his game.

I was at centre that night, of all places, and Tony Tuimavave and I tackled him at one stage, and Tony must have put some shit in because (Renouf) came up swinging basically. I was at second marker and he grabbed my shirt and gave me a mouthful, and I thought, 'here's my opportunity', so I smacked him right in the nose! Next minute, about five Broncos came in, and I didn't feel the punch but I had blood all over my face; I remember I had to come off a couple of times that night because I couldn't stop the bleeding. We lost (22-16) and they won the final (against Hunter Mariners) quite convincingly the following week, but we were right in the mix and it showed our potential.



Who were the biggest characters during your time with the Warriors?

I think the biggest joker was Joe Vagana, the big prop, I actually caught up with him at the Auckland Nines and he's still that big teddy bear. Stacey Jones in his own way was quite a character, especially off the field. Marc Ellis was always good for a court session. We had a court session in the UK, I think there was 26 people in the room and there wasn't one piece of clothing – that included staff, managers, doctors and allsorts, and he was the judge that day. I won't forget that in a hurry. They would probably be the main ones.

Hitro (Okesene) was a very loyal guy. He had a very lovely wife (Donna) and I believe they've moved back to Carlisle. I saw the scary side of Hitro one night; we'd had a pretty good result, beating St George's reserve grade side 14- or 16-nil. They were a good side, they had Kevin Campion in the team. Our flight got in about midnight and we thought we'd go to Hitro's house for a bit of a party; it was about 4am and Hitro had been unconscious on the couch for about three hours. He woke up, didn't say anything, but he grabbed a spear off the wall that he'd got from the Kiwis' tour of PNG a couple of years before, and chased the four of us that were left – I think it was Aaron Whittaker, myself, Logan Swann and Bryan Henare – and I can still remember hiding under the car in the driveway trying to keep away from him. This was bordering on South Auckland and we were getting chased by Hitro with a spear! He couldn't remember it the next day. But yeah, he was a cult hero with his hair and his hard running, head down. And he was one of those leaders in that reserve grade side, like Aaron and myself, that was there to guide those younger boys through.



How did you find playing alongside Stacey Jones in the halves?

He was probably our best ever. Basically he did everything on attack and I just fed the ball to Nigel (Vagana) and supported on the inside and tackled my arse off. I'd quite often get in the top two or three in the tackle count, and that was my job. I wish could have offered him more and taken the pressure off him, but I didn't have quite the skill-set or ability he had. I just tried to take care of the defensive side and leave him fresh basically.



How difficult was it to stay with the Warriors in 1999 after Frank was shown the door?

It was difficult, but I had a one-year contract. I think it did taint it for me a little bit. There were probably some at the club that would've liked to get rid of me at that stage, and thought, 'he might try to undermine us now that his Dad's left'. But I wasn't about that; I was still going to give a hundred, and to Mark Graham's credit, he gave me a fair opportunity. I probably lost a little bit spirit-wise, so it was probably one of my worst years. Because it's such a tough competition, you've got to be giving a hundred week in, week out. I probably did drop the ball a little bit there, but hey, I hung in there and got a handful of games (17).



You retired aged just 28 when many felt you weren't far off a Kiwis call-up – how close did you feel you were to getting a Test jumper?

Probably the closest I got to getting a call-up was in '98. Syd Eru was the hooker for the Kiwis and the Warriors, and we went out against North Sydney and he got injured quite badly in the first couple of minutes, so he was obviously out of the Test. So when Syd went down I was basically in. I played the next 60 minutes at hooker (against Norths) and I think with about 10 minutes to go I got caught in the cricket pitch (of North Sydney Oval) with my sprigs and Josh Stuart, the big North Sydney prop, we had a big collision and I popped a medial ligament and dislocated a kneecap. I knew at that stage that was my Kiwi chance gone. But they ended up managing to get Henry Paul out from England for that Test – before that I think he was unavailable – and the Kiwis went out and kicked arse. So I was rapt for the Kiwis and rapt for Dad, even though I never managed to get the Kiwis jersey.

The other chance when I got quite close was when the Kiwis had 16 picked for their side for the third Test against Great Britain in 1996, and we (New Zealand XIII) were the midweek game, which was basically the Warriors reserve grade team and a couple of local players. Dad flew down to Wellington and said, 'look, the best player today will get that No.17 spot for the Kiwis'. I scored the last two tries and we beat Great Britain, and I thought, 'shit, I've got a chance here'. Anyway they picked Logan Swann, who hadn't played first grade at that stage, and he played well that day as well and he deserved a spot. He ended up playing the next 20 or 30 Tests and ended up being a Kiwi legend, so I think Dad made the right decision.



Do you feel that being so versatile during your career held you back from cementing a permanent spot, or did it help you play more games than perhaps you would have if you specialised in one position?

It probably helped me play more games. I mean, the only reason you become versatile is because you're probably not good enough to cement that one spot. And in hindsight I wasn't good enough to cement that five-eighth spot because I didn't really have the kicking game, and I wasn't good enough to cement a hooker role or centre role because before I went to the Warriors I hadn't played in either position. Actually, I played a handful of games for Hull in the centres.

And it was hard, I remember sitting on the bench and I'd only trained five minutes at 6 during the week and then one of the outside backs got injured. Tea (Ropati) was supposed to be covering the outside backs, but because it was so early in the game he was still having his nervous shit in the changing rooms! Next thing, I'm playing the entire first half against the Roosters, who were a good side, at centre. And I probably hadn't trained at centre for four, five weeks. That was it, I was basically there to go out, tackle, plug up a hole, where in the NRL you need to be training and playing week in, week out in that same position to have any traction.

But I don't blame the coaches because I was just happy to be there and in hindsight because of that versatility I probably got more games than I deserved.



Did you retire so young due to a lack of passion for the game?

No, I basically got the option to go back to the UK, and Mark Graham had pretty much lined me up with a contract at London (Broncos). My wife (Jane) had just fallen pregnant the same week I found out I was cut (by the Warriors), so... she'd hated it the first time around. At some stage, a player needs to say it's time to give up the dream and traipsing your family halfway around the world for average money. If I was a Matthew Ridge or a Stacey Jones and I could get £400,000 then it's an easy decision.

And in hindsight I made the right decision, because in my first year after retiring, I made more money in business than I did playing five years of professional sport. And it's not always about the money, but it was then more about family. I was an average player on average money, why would I go halfway around the world to keep the dream alive? I'd had a good run and I think it was the right time.



You stayed in Auckland for several years after that?

Yeah, we did. And what I teach young fellas now is, sometimes you take a contract – I probably went from $30,000 down to $10,000 when I moved from England to Auckland, but I was smart enough to know the $10,000 wasn't the big thing. The Warriors were buzzing at that stage, and the contacts that we made in the corporate boxes after the match were worth five-fold of what my contract was worth.

I met a gentleman there that was tied up in the As Seen On TV business, and when he found out I was leaving the Warriors he offered me an opportunity, and it really set me up for life. So networking in those corporate boxes was invaluable.



When did you and your family move back to Canterbury?

It would have been 2006 when we came back. My oldest daughter turned 5, and it was always the family plan to bring her home for her schooling in Christchurch, and that (grandparents) Frank and Joan would be coming back from the UK to find a piece of land that we could bring up the family on, near the grandparents. So that was the main reason for coming home, more family than anything.



What have you been doing with yourself, aside from Rugby League, since you've been back in Canterbury?

Since the earthquakes, we've set up a building company, a plastering company and a painting company. We've got a number of League players working for us. Quite a few Linwood boys, quite a few Hornby boys. Just trying to look after that League community, and the business has been very successful. The last three or four years have gone really well, we've had up to 26 staff.

I've also got another company called Roar Material with a business partner, Hamish Miller, in Auckland. He's a very clever marketer, he works for FIFA and does a lot of work for New Zealand Football. We brand sports equipment, so we've got brands like ASB, McDonald's. So we brand soccer balls, cones and boot bags and that sort of thing.



Talk us through your coaching career in the region?

When I first got back there was a couple of clubs talking to me. Celebration at one stage asked me to give them a hand, so I went in there for a year and, where I could, added advice. Then I had a couple more years off and had a call from Jeff Whittaker to say that Halswell were looking for a new coach (in 2011), and at that stage they hadn't made the finals for four years. But Phil Prescott had done a lot of good work over the previous two years and got a pretty good team together. I was also talking with Linwood at that stage; they interviewed me as well, but I chose to go with Halswell. Which is a long way from Clarkeville, but I decided to give those guys a go.

I managed to get a couple of senior signings across, both from Celebration, Manu Weepu and Jaye Pukepuke. And I really thought we needed that muscle there, because Halswell always had a great ability to produce juniors but they would blood five of six juniors in at one time without that muscle around them and a lot of them got disillusioned, and beaten up basically. We had a real good mix; we won the Grand Final comfortably that year and won the competition.

Then the earthquake stuff started, and the following year (2012) I felt like I probably gave about 80 per cent to the team compared to 100 per cent the year before. We had a very good team and went very well in the competition, but we probably got the wettest day of the year in the Grand Final. We'd beaten Hornby by about 30 in the semi on a hard pitch two weeks beforehand but 'Stuey' (Hornby coach Brent Stuart) did a great job that day, got his boys fired up, and their older boys really stepped up – Corey Lawrie was exceptional that day – and they deserved their win.

At that stage my business was getting bigger and bigger, so I thought I would concentrate on work, because I've got staff I'm responsible for and I felt if I was to coach Halswell again I could only give them 60 per cent and those boys deserved 100. So Darrell Coad took over, with Craig Sutherland as manager, and they were extremely successful for the next couple of years. I think it's important that when you leave a club, you've got to make sure they're strong. You're not just walking away from it. I've stayed on the Halswell coaching panel for the last couple of years, selecting their coaches. But yeah, I really, really enjoyed it.

And this year I just employed a guy to take my role over, so I had a little bit more free time. I gave Halswell an indication I was happy to help them out where I could, but they've got a good coach in place there, Robbie (Fa'alilo), and he's obviously had it under control. I got an Sean O'Sullivan call from Papanui basically, saying that they were three weeks out from the competition starting, and they were having a few wee issues there, and could I turn up for a few trainings or half a season – we didn't really know. It was just 'can you turn up and help out', see how it goes, and possibly work on work ethic and that sort of thing. And I'm still there, I'm not sure how much longer they'll need me.



And the Tigers are having a great year so far?

Very much so. If someone had said we would win four of our first seven games, the first round, we would have been happy with that. I think Linwood's the team to beat, and to get them first up, I think was perfect for us because to get away to a 22-0 lead after 15 minutes was a luxury that won't happen again. They were the better team for the last 60 minutes and came home strong, but we held on and to get that win was a real bonus.

I think since then, we've worked hard for each of our wins. The boys have got to be given a lot of credit, you know, quite a few new players – it took a while to get the combinations – but a lot of Papanui boys here have been hammered in recent seasons; I can remembered beating them 104-nil with Halswell one year. But some of those boys have hung in there and they deserve this.



Having one of New Zealand's great coaching minds at your disposal, has Frank been forthcoming with advice?

Yeah he is, he's actually doing a bit with the (Papanui) 16s at the moment. He was coaching at Kaiapoi but they didn't have enough numbers in the 15s to fill the grade this year, so four or five of his boys went to play for Papanui, and he thought he'd follow them across and he's doing very similar to me – helping out where he can. Yeah look, he's knowledgeable, and quite often I'll pop over or call in on the way home from training and say 'this has happened' and 'what would you do if you were in my shoes?'.



Do you have any aspirations to go any further in the coaching sphere, or is it more about putting back into the local League community?

No, I don't think so mate. I'm 43 now, so if I was to try to make it, you'd spend 10 or 15 years working your way through the 18s and NRL 20s and reserve grade sides, you know, and again you're traipsing your family around for a dream. And the chances of getting an appointment at the end of it are very minimal, and if you do get an appointment, how long's your career? So I'm quite happy with how we are as a family, and financially, so I can just give back mate.

And I'm bound to cop flak out there because there's probably people out there calling me disloyal – 'you've coached a bit at Celebration, you've coached at Halswell, and now you're coaching at Papanui but you're a Hornby player, what's the story' – but I'm here for Rugby League mate. I don't care what club people say. Halswell needed a hand, and because of my friendship with Jeff Whittaker I said I'd do it and I did it for two years. Now Papanui have come to me and said they needed a hand, and that's what I've done. Hey, there's going to be haters out there, but if we were getting beaten by 50 or 60 they'd be saying nothing. To me, if they're talking about us, that means we're a threat and must doing something right.

At the end of the day, I'm getting paid absolutely nothing from Papanui, I didn't want any money, I don't need the money. I'm there to help 20 young men achieve what they deserve.



It's been a particularly tough time for Rugby League in Canterbury since the earthquakes. How do you feel the code is shaping up here now?

Everyone told me that when the earthquake hit, it would be great for rugby and Rugby League because we'd have an influx of labourers and whatnot. But it actually worked in reverse. The labourers that came from Auckland and Aussie came here to work, not play sport. And the guys that were currently playing were then super busy, so a lot of them dropped away. Because on a Saturday they might earn $250 – well, most clubs in Christchurch, the players don't get paid. So why wouldn't you put food on the table and work on a Saturday?

And traffic's doubled, so you're getting less and less at trainings because guys are late. It is frustrating, but at the end of the day these boys are giving their services for next to nothing, they're putting their bodies on the line each Saturday for a club, getting nothing out of it – it actually costs you money now to play. So the days of banging the tables and saying, 'if you don't turn up to both trainings you're back down to the Bs' are over. You've just got to be flexible and understand, put yourself in their position.

Playing-wise, I still think we've got a good competition at premier level. I think where we're falling down is we're losing kids when they start high school. Anyone with talent is getting earmarked by rugby schools. And I can't blame the parents of the kids for that, because if I was a parent that had a kid at Hornby High, where I went, or Aranui High or Linwood College, and I got a rugby scholarship to go to St Andrew's or St Bede's, all expenses paid for, then to me as a parent that would be a better pathway.

There was a bit of money around at school level when I played, and I can remember one year we might have had 14, 16 schools in that competition. It would be nice to get a sponsor to sponsor a school competition. I think there's a lot of guys out there that actually prefer League to play but perceive there's more opportunities in rugby, hence why they go down that path. What they don't realise is that in rugby they might be up against another 10 or 12 quality players, and the chances of making the Crusaders or whatever is, I think, minimal.

They've got to remember that there's scouts coming over here all the time, and they feel obligated to pick one or two players up to justify their trip. So if you're playing here as a young fella, and you come to League, you haven't got the same competition. It is actually a lot easier to get that pathway and suddenly you're with an NRL club.

https://www.sportingpulse.com/assoc...77-0-0-0&&news_task=DETAIL&articleID=34956379
 
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Nice article. Marc Ellis didn't want to go back out with a broken nose as not to ruin his TV career; have to feel sorry for their teammates at the time when Ridge and Ellis are more worried about their TV skits than their footy.

Do we need to update Marc Ellis' status to disrupting neighbours on Waiheke Island?
https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/lo...74/marc-ellis-driveway-briar-ross-stands-firm
https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/home-property/69112114/marc-ellis-waiheke-driveway-stoush

Nice house though; it looks like something out of Grand Designs. I'd love to have a swimming pool and a gym, well a proper gym not just a couple of weights and some kettlebells in the garage.
 

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Nice article. Marc Ellis didn't want to go back out with a broken nose as not to ruin his TV career; have to feel sorry for their teammates at the time when Ridge and Ellis are more worried about their TV skits than their footy.

Do we need to update Marc Ellis' status to disrupting neighbours on Waiheke Island?
https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/lo...74/marc-ellis-driveway-briar-ross-stands-firm
https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/home-property/69112114/marc-ellis-waiheke-driveway-stoush

Nice house though; it looks like something out of Grand Designs. I'd love to have a swimming pool and a gym, well a proper gym not just a couple of weights and some kettlebells in the garage.
That article was noted in his entry.

https://www.nzwarriors.com/threads/2015-where-are-they-now.40187/page-2#post-490873

Doing some work in that gated estate and the houses and views are amazing. Some rich folk on the 3 roads past the gate. Marks pad looks down onto the Matiatia Wharf with Rangitoto, Browns Island and Auckland in the backdrop...
 
That article was noted in his entry.

https://www.nzwarriors.com/threads/2015-where-are-they-now.40187/page-2#post-490873

Doing some work in that gated estate and the houses and views are amazing. Some rich folk on the 3 roads past the gate. Marks pad looks down onto the Matiatia Wharf with Rangitoto, Browns Island and Auckland in the backdrop...
Fantastic article on Shane Endacott...so great to hear him and his family are doing well...its the journeymen players who enable the rockstars to strut there stuff. Great thread Mt Wellington !
 
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mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Fantastic article on Shane Endacott...so great to hear him and his family are doing well...its the journeymen players who enable the rockstars to strut there stuff.
Yeah I loved the piece. Appreciate his honesty. All too often you get former players still spitting out the typical diplomatic answers but I felt Shane was being very candid in his responses. Would love to see more of these type of pieces...
 
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mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Should be a good read. Hopefully a warts and all account and he throws up some interesting tidbits about his time with us. Guys a legend with all he overcame and looking forward to its release...

Brent Tate reveals the relief he felt after career-ending knee injury, in new book Iron Will
BRENT TATE
THE COURIER-MAIL
JUNE 20, 2015 9:00PM
489853-cc586ab6-14c3-11e5-8cab-50fca574effe.jpg

Brent Tate is helped from the field after suffering a career-ending knee injury. Picture: Gregg Porteous

QUEENSLAND stalwart Brent Tate suffered a knee injury during Origin II a year ago which ended his career. In this exclusive extract from his upcoming autobiography Iron Will, Tate reveals the pressure his battle against injuries exerted on him for more than a decade.

IT WAS a feeling of relief. It was like I could breathe for the first time in many years.

I had just had my right knee blow out on me for the second time in my life.

story-fnp0lyn6-1227407489933

It was 18 June 2014: the date of Game Two of that year’s State of Origin series and my 23rd playing for Queensland — the team that had been an inspiration in my difficult times.

Adding my first-grade club games for three clubs and 26 Tests, there had been 278 games, not counting all the matches from the age of five for clubs in Toowoomba and Redcliffe, which had positioned me for a run at the NRL, my life’s dream.



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Brent Tate’s autobiography Iron Will.



Here’s another statistic: 16 operations. I have had four knee reconstructions, nine ankle operations, major surgeries to my shoulder, groin and throat, and two arthroscopies to clean up a knee.

When NSW forward Ryan Hoffman then closed in over the top and trapped my right leg under him in a legitimate tackle, I knew that, in a split second, I was cooked as a rugby league player.

My thoughts were, ‘I’ve done my knee. I’m never playing footy again. I’m done. No pressure anymore.’

I tried to control my emotion as I was helped from the field by team staff and had my injury assessed.

I did not want my reaction to the injury to distract my teammates, as I fear I had done at halftime of the 2010 Four Nations final.

The Morons went behind against the run of play with Trent Hodkinson’s converted try, nine minutes from fulltime, and we lost 6-4.

Morons coach Mal Meninga says he felt at first glance of the Hoffman tackle that my career was over.

“We were extremely sorry for him,’’ Mal said. “But he was positive in that he had quickly resolved himself that that was probably his career over and it would be time to do something else in his life.



490724-cb5bfe7a-14c3-11e5-8cab-50fca574effe.jpg

Brent Tate says he felt relief after suffering the knee injury in Origin. Picture: Gregg Porteous



“What a way to go out, in the Moron jersey. Probably the way you’d like to go out.’’

My wife Lani recalls: “Our children Kyden and Macy got to watch some of the start of the game and they were in bed (when Brent was injured).

“When they woke up the next morning, I sat them down and told them Dad had hurt his knee. “He is going to be very sad when he gets home today,’’ I said.

“Kyden asked if he would keep playing. Fairly quickly, Brent thought that the decision had been made for him.’’

The great Australian way is to make out you’re bulletproof. It’s the rugby league way too and has been for as long as I know.

The game has given me so much, but it’s taken so much too.

I had three knee reconstructions in three-and-a-quarter years from July 2007, and since have been aware that my next training session or my next match could be my last.

Before I even got that far, my career looked like being over in 2004, at the age of 22, when waiting to see whether pain and numbness from a recurrent nerve problem in my neck would be cured by rest. I told reporters that I might have to sit out the whole season, or maybe even leave the game altogether.

I kept on playing because I didn’t want to quit; I didn’t want it to beat me. My footy career was a fight.



489881-ca1727a6-14c3-11e5-8cab-50fca574effe.jpg

Brent Tate is helped from the field. Picture: Gregg Porteous



Part of the reason I kept going was, simply, I loved playing footy. Part of it was this was all I knew. It was putting food on the table. Part of it was I saw this as a test of my character. Who wants to fail those, or quit at those?

Some of my most challenging times were between 2003 and 2005, when I was trying to find answers about the pins and needles and numbness I would get when contacted heavily in a game. Every time I was hit in the head — and I’m not talking about high tackles as such but the bumps your head gets in a game of footy — it would send my left arm dead. In footy, we call them burners. You crush your nerve and your arm feels dead. The pain is often bad.

It kept happening if my neck was extended in a certain way.

I was going into games terrified of getting these burner episodes, it was occurring that often. For two months, I couldn’t pick up a glass of water and tip it in my mouth with my left hand. I’m thinking, ‘I can’t keep doing this.’

When I went to the spinal surgeon, Richard Williams, for the first time in April 2005, he said, ‘There is nothing we can do for your neck. There is nothing to fix it with an operation. You might just have to finish.’

With rest and a neck brace, the prototype designed by Broncos physio Rod Godbolt, I was able to play another nine years.



490778-a30e918a-14c3-11e5-8cab-50fca574effe.jpg

Brent Tate hobbles into Queensland training.



Truth be told, I had a real love — hate relationship with footy for a couple of years, particularly around 2006—07. There were times when I was playing for the Broncos in that period when I was sitting on the bus to go to a game thinking I would rather be anywhere else in the world; I’d rather be doing anything than this shit. I hated it sometimes.

How does a man of 24 or 25 get to harbour feelings of hate towards a profession that had shaped my life? I had been, as I said, through three years of uncertainty over whether I would need to retire because of my neck — a personal calamity averted with the judicious and inventive use of some foam rubber and a shoulder harness.

I was also struggling with the situation that, in 2007, I loved my club, the Broncos, more than they wanted me, and I was coming to the end of a painful realisation that I was going to have to join another team.

My mother has been really upset at different times over the years. When I broke my jaw in 2010, I remember she rang and pleaded with me to stop. ‘Haven’t you had enough?’ she asked.

I sometimes wish I had taken her advice.

I hate to think what Mum and my wife, Lani, have gone through. I almost feel sick in the stomach, thinking what I put myself through. I feel sad sometimes.



****



My mates and my wife Lani all tell me that my absolute rock bottom came when I re-ruptured the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft in my left knee in November 2010.

I thought I was finished that night. Instead I played until 2014, when I was 32.

So here I am in 2015, a retired player, watching the first rugby league season I haven’t played any part in since I was five.

Physically, I am old past my 33 years. There wouldn’t be a step I take where I don’t know that my knee isn’t what it should be.

My knee surgeon Dr Peter Myers says I will need a knee replacement. It may be in eight years’ time. If I’m lucky, it will be in 15 or 20 years. We have to keep it as far away as possible.

I don’t think about what it means when our kids — Kyden, 7, and Macy, 4, — are in their teens. Through last summer, I couldn’t really run with them but I am told I will improve in the mid-term.

My left ankle is a problem too. Sometimes, it’s stiff when I wake up and it takes a while to get going. For a few years now, it’s been bone on bone.

I still get pins and needles in my hands every now and again. I have one side of my face that doesn’t sweat or go red during exercise. It’s the left side of my body where I had the burners from my neck injury.

What I hope for is that all the things they are doing with stem-cell research will be able to help people who have had knee injuries as severe as mine. I went to Brisbane and saw a doctor who specialises in it. I gather they haven’t got to the point where they can be sure they can turn the cells into cartilage.

If they can perfect it, I’ll be first in line.



Iron Will, by Brent Tate, with Paul Malone

Rafa Publishing, available July 1, RRP $34.99.

https://www.couriermail.com.au/spor...w-book-iron-will/story-fnp0lyn6-1227407489933
 
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That would be a good read. He went through a lot of injuries throughout his career with his neck and knee issues. Those types of auto biographies are usually pretty good ones reading how they got over each set back to get back to the top.
 
Phil Blake banned for six months for betting against his own team.....

Former Leicester Tigers defence coach Phil Blake banned for placing eight separate bets on his own team
6:02PM BST 25 Jun 2015

Blake placed the bets over two matches and made money in game that saw Leicester lose 23-8 to Toulon
Blake4_3354282b.jpg

Phil Blake has been fined £669 - the profit made on the bets placed Photo: PA


Former Leicester defence coach Phil Blake has been banned for six months by a Rugby Football Union disciplinary panel after he was found guilty of two breaches of anti-corruption and betting rules.

The 51-year-old Australian was found guilty of placing a bet on a European Champions Cup match between Toulon and the Tigers on December 13 last year, and also betting on an Aviva Premiership match between Newcastle and Leicester on March 8.

Blake, who was also fined £669 - the profit made on the bets placed - and ordered to pay costs of £500, will be barred from rugby-related activity until November 24, 2015.

The judgement said Blake's behaviour "undermines public confidence in the integrity of the sport and strikes at the foundations of the Game."

Christopher Quinlan QC, chairman of the RFU Disciplinary Panel said: "This is the first such case that we know of in rugby union and is certainly the first brought under the relatively new Regulation 17, so this is new ground.

leicester_3298640b.jpg

Leicester Tigers finished third in last season's Aviva Premiership


"In arriving at the appropriate sanction we have been careful to remind ourselves that we must not make an example of Phil Blake.

"We have imposed a sanction which we consider fair and proportionate to what he did, while having due regard to the proper consideration of deterrence. We have sought to strike a proper balance between the competing factors and arrive at a sanction we consider to be just.

"We must have regard to the wider interests of the game. It is important that those involved in the game and the wider public understand that any breach of the anti-corruption and betting regulations will and must be treated seriously."

Blake's appeal against the length of the ban was subsequently dismissed by the RFU.

London-born Blake joined Leicester in June 2014 on a one-year deal which was not renewed at the end of last season.

And the Tigers spoke highly of the former Manly coach in a response to the RFU's ban.

A statement read: "We acknowledge the decision of the disciplinary hearing in relation to the conduct of Phil Blake and the panel's views on betting within professional sport.

"The club also fully endorses the governing body's regard for the wider interests of the game in respect of any breaches of the anti-corruption and betting regulations.

"Phil Blake was under contract for the 2014/15 season and is no longer employed by Leicester Tigers. The club would, however, like to place on record, as it did during his time at Leicester, that he was a popular and valued member of the coaching team and we hope he is fully able to return to the game in a suitable capacity at the end of the period laid down by the disciplinary hearing."

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/r...cing-eight-separate-bets-on-his-own-team.html
 
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mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
WAKEFIELD WILDCATS SIGN KEVIN LOCKE
POSTED ON 25 JUNE 2015

kevin_locke.jpg


Wakefield Trinity Wildcats have secured the signing of full-back Kevin Locke until the end of the season.

The New Zealander has joined the club until the end of the season as a free agent, pending a visa confirmation.

Locke who was born in Auckland started his playing career at New Zealand Warriors in 2009, finishing his first season at the club as top points scorer. After five years at the Warriors, Locke signed a three-year deal with Super League side Salford Red Devils in 2014.

The 26-year-old represented New Zealand Maori in a warm-up to the 2008 Rugby League World Cup. In 2009 Locke was then named in the New Zealand Kiwis 23-man squad to play in the Four Nations tournament in Europe, unfortunately for the full-back he did not feature. Locke later represented New Zealand in the 2013 Rugby League World Cup Final at Old Trafford.

Chairman Michael Carter is pleased to have signed Locke saying, “I am delighted to welcome Kevin Locke to the club. Kevin showed a great desire to come and play his rugby here and get a smile back on his face.

“We think we can help him achieve that which will be good for him and us. I can’t wait to see him pull on the red, white and blue jersey.”

Kevin Locke will be in contention for next Wednesday’s fixture against Hull FC at Belle Vue.

https://www.wakefieldwildcats.co.uk/news/2015/06/wakefield-wildcats-sign-kevin-locke
 

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
DRAGONS

Who’s hot: The Dragons’ most controversial recruit, former Warrior, Knight and convict Russell Packer has acquitted himself well in his initial stint with the Illawarra Cutters in the NSW Cup.

While his match fitness is still returning slowly Packer has lost none of his impact carrying the ball or his ferocity in defence and he’s boosted the Cutters in the middle of the field.

While Packer is ineligible to be called up to the top grade this season, once he gets a full pre-season under his belt he’s sure to quickly return to the form that saw him become a New Zealand Test regular.

901938-c97d68e4-1948-11e5-9c5f-a3fcf311867f.jpg

Russell Packer has been in fine form for the Cutters.

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/s...ock-at-your-club/story-fnp0lyn3-1227410903054

1434237947771.jpg
 

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Only 22 players left guys :). If anyone can help with any of the following please let us know...

19. Syd Eru - 43 - ??? Link
31. Mark Carter - 46 - ??? Link
38. Bryan Henare - 40 - ??? Still living in Auckland but thats I can find out at the moment Link
45. Paul Staladi - 39 - ??? Link
49. David Bailey - 45 - ???Link
54. Zane Clark - ???Link
60. Terry Hermansson - ??? Possibly living in Christchurch Link
63. Peter Lewis - 35 - ??? Link
69. John Simon - 42 - ??? Link
74. Matt Spence - 38 - ??? Link
80. Shontayne Hape - 33 - ??? Travelling the world at the moment Link
84. Jonathan Smith - 35 - ??? Link
95. John Carlaw - 39 - ??? Possibly medical supplies sales
106. Vince Mellars - 30 - ??? Possibly retired and living in Brisbane Link
116. Shannon Stowers - 35 - ???Link
120. Paul Atkins - 32 -??? Link
132. Wade Mckinnon - 33 - ??? Link
133. Michael Crockett - ??? Link
134. Michael Witt - 31 - ??? Retired from Rugby League and looking to get into coaching Link
141. Russell Packer - 25 - ??? Just released from jail Link
155. Siuatonga Likiliki - 24 - ??? Living in Gold Coast, Australia and currently without a contract Link
161. Mataupu Poching - 26 - ??? Link

Only got 21 left to account for. Might jump on twitter and do some stalking. If anyone knows the whereabouts of any of the following players than please let us know. No matter how small a lead it is I'll follow it up. Thanks to all that help keep this up to date.

Dont forget the 1st page has all the players links...

19. Syd Eru - 43 - ??? Link
31. Mark Carter - 46 - ??? Link
38. Bryan Henare - 40 - ??? Still living in Auckland but thats I can find out at the moment Link
45. Paul Staladi - 39 - ??? Link
49. David Bailey - 45 - ???Link
54. Zane Clark - ???Link
60. Terry Hermansson - ??? Possibly living in Christchurch Link
63. Peter Lewis - 35 - ??? Link
69. John Simon - 42 - ??? Link
74. Matt Spence - 38 - ??? Link
80. Shontayne Hape - 33 - ??? Travelling the world at the moment Link
84. Jonathan Smith - 35 - ??? Link
95. John Carlaw - 39 - ??? Possibly medical supplies sales
106. Vince Mellars - 30 - ??? Possibly retired and living in Brisbane Link
116. Shannon Stowers - 35 - ???Link
120. Paul Atkins - 32 -??? Link
132. Wade Mckinnon - 33 - ??? Link
133. Michael Crockett - ??? Link
134. Michael Witt - 31 - ??? Retired from Rugby League and looking to get into coaching Link
155. Siuatonga Likiliki - 24 - ??? Living in Gold Coast, Australia and currently without a contract Link
161. Mataupu Poching - 26 - ??? Link
 

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